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jerryking : effectiveness   28

How to Read a Book: The Ultimate Guide by Mortimer Adler
Reading alone isn't enough to improve your knowledge. Learning something insightful requires work. You have to read something above your current level. You need to find writers who are more knowledgeable on a particular subject than yourself. This is how you get smarter.

Reading for understanding narrows the gap between reader and writer.

The Four Levels of Reading
Mortimer Adler literally wrote the book on reading. In his book, How to Read a Book, he identifies four levels of reading:

Elementary
Inspectional
Analytical
Syntopical
The goal of reading determines how you read.

**********************************************
Become a Demanding Reader
Reading is all about asking the right questions in the right order and seeking answers.

There are four main questions you need to ask of every book:

What is this book about?
What is being said in detail and how?
Is this book true in whole or in part?
What of it?

If all of this sounds like hard work, you’re right. Most people won’t do it. That’s what sets you apart.
advice  asking_the_right_questions  books  critical_thinking  deep_learning  effectiveness  efficiencies  GTD  hard_work  howto  intentionality  metacognition  productivity  purpose  reading  smart_people  work_smarter 
may 2018 by jerryking
THE ROLE AND VALUE OF AN EFFECTIVE ADVISORY BOARD •
by: Barry Reiter
Issues: September / October 2003. Categories: Governance.
boards_&_directors_&_governance  Ivey  best_of  effectiveness 
june 2017 by jerryking
Neil deGrasse Tyson on What Every Child Should Know About Science - WSJ
By Chris Kornelis
Updated May 18, 2017

The best advice I’ve ever received is: “It’s not good enough to be right. You also need to be effective.” Cyril deGrasse Tyson, 1928-2016.
profile  science  advice  Neil_deGrasse_Tyson  African-Americans  quotes  affirmations  effectiveness  scientifically_literate 
may 2017 by jerryking
Unless You’re Oprah, ‘Be Yourself’ Is Terrible Advice. - The New York Times
Adam Grant JUNE 4, 2016
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authenticity  sincerity  advice  truth-telling  effectiveness  Adam_Grant 
february 2017 by jerryking
Little Brother
Sep 11th 2014 | The Economist | Alexandra Suich.

In 1963 David Ogilvy, the father of Madison Avenue and author of a classic business book, “Confessions of an Advertising Man”, wrote: “An advertisement is like a radar sweep, constantly hunting new prospects as they come into the market. Get a good radar, and keep it sweeping.”.....Behavioural profiling has gone viral across the internet, enabling firms to reach users with specific messages based on their location, interests, browsing history and demographic group......Extreme personalisation in advertising has been slow to come... online advertising space is unlimited and prices are low, so making money is not as easy as it was in the offline world,.....Digital advertising is being buoyed by three important trends. The first is the rise of mobile devices, such as smartphones....The second, related trend is the rise of social networks such as Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest, which have become an important navigation system for people looking for content across the web. ......The third big development has been the rise of real-time bidding, or “programmatic buying”, a new system for targeting consumers precisely and swiftly with online adverts. Publishers, advertisers and intermediaries can now bid for digital ads electronically and direct them to specific consumers at lightning speed.....The lines between established media businesses are becoming blurred. Richard Edelman, the boss of Edelman, a public-relations firm, describes the media and advertising business as a “mosh pit”. .... clients’ biggest question is whether people will even notice their ads. ...This special report will show that technology is profoundly changing the dynamics of advertising. Building on the vast amount of data produced by consumers’ digital lives, it is giving more power to media companies that have a direct relationship with their customers and can track them across different devices. ....Consumers may gain from advertising tailored to their particular needs, and so far most of them seem content to accept the ensuing loss of privacy. But companies are sensitive to the potential costs of overstepping the mark. As the head of one British advertising firm puts it: “Once people realise what’s happening, I can’t imagine there won’t be pushback.”
Facebook  Twitter  Pinterest  Ogilvy_&_Mather  David_Ogilvy  behavioural_targeting  pushback  books  effectiveness  haystacks  privacy  native_advertising  ad-tech  Conversant  Kraft  personalization  trends  mobile_phones  smartphones  social_media  real-time  auctions  programmatic  advertising  online_advertising  Omnicom 
february 2017 by jerryking
Facebook Is Rolling Out a Handful of New Measurement Tools for Advertisers – Adweek
By Marty Swant|September 21, 2016

Third-party partnerships help track sales, lift and clicks
Facebook  LBMA  Tune  measurements  omnichannel  effectiveness  tools  partnerships 
february 2017 by jerryking
How to Scale Yourself and Get More Done Than You Thought Possible
Understand Effectiveness Versus Efficiency

"Effectiveness is goal orientation. This is picking something to do. This is doing right things—picking a goal and doing that goal," Hanselman says. "Efficiency is doing things in an economical way, process-oriented.

"So phrased differently: Effectiveness is doing the right things, but efficiency is doing things right. That means effectiveness is picking a direction and efficiency is running really fast in that direction," he says.

"Effectiveness is doing the right things, but efficiency is doing things right."- Scott Hanselman

"When you realize those two things are different, it becomes an extremely powerful tool that you can use."
advice  effectiveness  efficiencies  goal-orientation  GTD  howto  personal_payoffs  personal_productivity  process-orientation  productivity  scaling 
march 2016 by jerryking
Why growth hacking is a foreign concept to many business owners - The Globe and Mail
MIA PEARSON
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, May. 21 2015,

Quite simply, growth hacking is about focusing your energy in the right areas, being creative and using a combination of analytical thinking, social metrics and long-term thinking to power low-cost innovation....“The most successful businesses are always trying to find scalable and repeatable methods for growth, and their marketing strategies and tactics are rooted in data and technology,”...Use data analytics Markus Frind, CEO of PlentyOfFish and a speaker at Traction Conf, describes growth hacking for him as “applying data to marketing to achieve growth, via virality.”

Mr. Frind started his company in 2003 and grew it into one of the largest online dating sites in the world. With more than 100 million users and $100-million in revenue, he knows what he’s talking about. And luckily, Google Analytics is available to everyone.

For Mr. Frind, growth hacking boils down to a combination of “SEO, split-testing and understanding the virality of the users.” He believes understanding that made it “easy to see what was working and what wasn’t.”

By understanding where traffic is coming from and why people are seeking you out, you have a stronger understanding of your consumer – and you’re incredibly short-sighted if you don’t think your consumer defines your brand. This is a significant piece of the puzzle for growing a business.
analytics  customer_insights  effectiveness  growth_hacking  innovation  long-term  marketing  repeatability  SEO  short-sightedness  small_business  virality 
june 2015 by jerryking
In business and government, think differently - The Globe and Mail
MICHAEL SABIA
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Saturday, May. 16 2015

here’s the paradox. At a time when creativity is relentlessly driving change in so much of our world, many would limit governments to managing their way through, rather than working with others to solve problems.

It started in the 1980s and ’90s, when we decided governments needed to become “more like businesses,” adopting the metrics – and vocabulary – of corporations. Citizens became “clients.” Compliance replaced creativity.

The job of government was defined in terms of its “efficiency,” and the emphasis was placed on the minimal “must do” instead of the aspirational “can be.”

Of course, governments have to demonstrate good stewardship of public resources. But if all they do is count change, it limits their ability to effect change. The fact is when big problems arise – whether it’s a financial crisis like 2008 or a tragedy like Lac-Mégantic – people’s first instinct is to look to government for a solution.

Yet opinion researchers tell us that people are increasingly disappointed with our collective response to the issues that matter most: income inequality, health care for the elderly, climate change and so on....It’s about different government. This is about government moving away from a manager’s obsession with doing things better to a leader’s focus on doing better things. Think of fostering innovation, being open to new ideas, encouraging experimentation, rewarding risk-taking. And, frankly, accepting failure as a condition precedent to success.
business  businessman_fallacy  CDPQ  CEOs  compliance  creativity  disappointment  effectiveness  efficiencies  experimentation  failure  government  innovation  leadership  Michael_Sabia  open_source  public_sector  risk-taking  stewardship  thinking  think_differently  trial_&_error 
may 2015 by jerryking
TV Networks Borrow Page From Digital Rivals to Attract Advertisers - NYTimes.com
MAY 11, 2015 | NYT | By SYDNEY EMBER.

Coca-Cola is just one of many brands now shifting advertising budgets to digital and social media, which offer the promise of better consumer data and the ability to reach targeted audiences....“Everyone is coming out with a data play, a data product, right now,” said Jeff Lucas, head of sales for Viacom Media Networks, whose channels include MTV and Nickelodeon.

Television networks, which rely on the upfront season for tens of billions of ad dollars, are facing declining ratings and heightened competition from digital outlets. And while television still dominates the ad market, with some $70 billion in ad spending last year in the United States, online ad spending is swelling. In particular, digital video, which attracted $5.8 billion in ad spending in the United States last year, is expected to grow to $7.8 billion this year and to $12.8 billion by 2018, according to the research firm eMarketer.....the line between TV and digital is blurring, and that advertisers care more about the effectiveness of their ads than where they run.
Coca-Cola  television  advertising  digital_media  online_advertising  web_video  Hulu  tools  brands  effectiveness  data_driven 
may 2015 by jerryking
Eight ways to become the most proactive person you know - The Globe and Mail
MICHAEL MOGILL
Young Entrepreneur Council
Published Tuesday, Dec. 09 2014

It’s all about you. No one else is going to get you where you want to go – it’s up to you.... Take ownership of your problems, and realize that nobody else is going to solve them for you.

Be solution-focused. ...The most effective way to handle a problem is to focus on finding a solution. Focusing on things that are out of your control is a waste of time, so focus on what you can control with the final outcome.

Be accountable. Set your clearly defined, quantifiable goal and then work backwards from that goal to establish metrics to track and evaluate it.

Use “SMART” goals. S: Specific (Pick something particular instead of using a broad category.) M: Measurable (Choose something you can quantify.) A: Attainable (You should actually be able to reach this, and it may just require the right steps.) R: Realistic (Be honest – it’s probably unrealistic to say you will go from making $10,000 to being a billionaire in one year.)T: Timely (Give each goal a timeframe to create a sense of urgency.)

Make your own luck. Being successful ... is about taking steps every day to be better than you were the day before by moving in a positive, forward trajectory. Make a blueprint and set out milestones for yourself in specific timeframes, or you are not going to hit your goal. Things do not come to fruition just because you really, really want them to happen. You have to make them happen.

Be consistent. Ultimately, success is not about getting everything right. It is about being consistent. Are you consistently and persistently taking steps every day to steadily move toward your goal?

Find the right people. Surrounding yourself with driven, effective people is a proven way to help you succeed.

Honesty is the best policy. Busywork is not effectiveness/progress. At the end of the day, if you don’t hit your goals, you are only doing a disservice to yourself. You cannot get better if you tell yourself, “Oh, it’s okay, I’m fine where I am.” (There has to be a certain element of sustained dissatisfaction).
accountability  affirmations  beyond_one's_control  blueprints  books  busywork  chance  character_traits  consistency  contingency  dissatisfaction  effectiveness  goal-setting  GTD  honesty  indispensable  intrinsically_motivated  It's_up_to_me  JCK  ksfs  luck  Managing_Your_Career  personal_control  proactivity  problem_solving  productivity  rainmaking  restlessness  self-starters  solutions  solution-finders  span_of_control  the_right_people  thinking_backwards  work-back_schedules 
december 2014 by jerryking
Five questions to hone your business strategy - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Sep. 28 2014

1. Why does our business deserve to succeed?
2. What would a new CEO do?
3. Imagine it is three to six years in the future and the proposed strategy has been unsuccessful. Why did it fail?
4. What would have to be true for our strategy to succeed?
5. Would I put my own money into this?
strategy  business_planning  Harvey_Schachter  execution  effectiveness  assumptions  anticipating  questions  biases  overconfidence  self-delusions  skin_in_the_game 
september 2014 by jerryking
Why Machiavelli Still Matters - NYTimes.com
By JOHN SCOTT and ROBERT ZARETSKY
Published: December 9, 2013

“The Prince” is a manual for those who wish to win and keep power. The Renaissance was awash in such how-to guides, but Machiavelli’s was different. To be sure, he counsels a prince on how to act toward his enemies, using force and fraud in war. But his true novelty resides in how we should think about our friends. It is at the book’s heart, in the chapter devoted to this issue, that Machiavelli proclaims his originality.

Set aside what you would like to imagine about politics, Machiavelli writes, and instead go straight to the truth of how things really work, or what he calls the “effectual truth.” [Effectual truth means not only that the truth will have an effect, a consequence, but also that its effect will show. Those who try to live by a profession of good will fail and be shown to fail. ] You will see that allies in politics, whether at home or abroad, are not friends....Machiavelli teaches that in a world where so many are not good, you must learn to be able to not be good. The virtues taught in our secular and religious schools are incompatible with the virtues one must practice to safeguard those same institutions. The power of the lion and the cleverness of the fox: These are the qualities a leader must harness to preserve the republic.

For such a leader, allies are friends when it is in their interest to be. (We can, with difficulty, accept this lesson when embodied by a Charles de Gaulle; we have even greater difficulty when it is taught by, say, Hamid Karzai.) What’s more, Machiavelli says, leaders must at times inspire fear not only in their foes but even in their allies — and even in their own ministers.
cynicism  Niccolò_Machiavelli  Medici  indispensable  advice  friendships  politics  power  virtues  interests  consigliere  leaders  self-interest  fear  adaptability  political_power  self-preservation  effectiveness  Charles_de_Gaulle  negative_space  primers 
december 2013 by jerryking
Activity Does Not Always Equal Productivity - NYTimes.com
October 11, 2013 | NYT | By TONY SCHWARTZ.

"Don't Confuse Motion and Progress"

We're more multitasking more today than you ever have before...
The real issue is whether you’re getting the right things done....what stands in the way of your being truly productive? What's the right balance between attending to what’s truly urgent and focusing on what’s less pressing but will most likely add the most enduring value.
(1) You need more sleep than you think, and maybe much more. 95 percent of us need at least seven to eight hours of sleep to feel fully rested.
(2) Do the most important thing first. The pull to e-mail is powerful and Pavlovian. By checking your e-mail first, you effectively turn over your agenda to others. It is far better to decide what your agenda ought to be the night before and make that the first thing you focus on at work, without interruption, for up to 90 minutes. If you must check e-mail when you get up because there are urgent messages, scan quickly for anything that truly cannot wait an hour. Answer those, ignore the rest, and then do what’s truly most important.
(3) Stop pushing through. Human beings are designed to operate in 90-minute cycles...By focusing more intensely for shorter periods, you’ll get more done, in less time, at a higher level of quality, more sustainably.
(4) Get it off your mind. With so much coming at us all the time, it’s hardly surprising that our instinctive default is to do whatever feels most urgent and easiest to address. The consequence, of course, is that we often keep putting off what’s most challenging and then lack the energy to do it by the time we finally get to it. BELIEVE IN LISTS, first and foremost as a means of downloading everything that’s on your mind to get it off your mind....keep all lists in one place. For example, what I want to do that day, over the next week, and in the longer term. I also keep a list of e-mails I need to send; calls I intend to make; ideas I want to explore further; issues I want to discuss with specific colleagues; and even things that are making me feel anxious... The other value I derive from detailed lists is that they help clarify what I ought not to be focused on. By having everything in one place, I can much more easily decide what’s truly important and what’s not. Half the value of having a list is to make it more obvious what not to do. I might have 50 to 100 items on my lists, but I typically give explicit priority to three or fewer in any given day.
(5) Make it matter. Finally, and simply, ask yourself a simple question before you begin any activity: “Is this the best way I could be spending my time?” If the answer is no, don’t do it.
work_life_balance  productivity  lists  effectiveness  GTD  busy_work  e-mail  Tony_Schwartz  multitasking  sleep  timeouts  priorities  affirmations  monotasking  To-Do 
october 2013 by jerryking
Delivering on the Promise of Nonprofits
December 2008 | HBR | Jeffrey L. Bradach (jeff.bradach@bridgespan.org) is the managing partner and a cofounder of the Bridgespan Group, a nonprofit
that provides strategy consulting and executive search services to nonprofits and philanthropy organizations. Thomas J. Tierney
(thomas.tierney@bridgespan.org) is the chairman and a cofounder of Bridgespan and a former worldwide managing director of
Bain & Company. Nan Stone (nan.stone@bridgespan.org) is a knowledge partner at Bridgespan and a former editor of Harvard
Business Review.

Idea in Brief
• U.S. nonprofits face mounting pressure to demonstrate the effectiveness of their programs—but the sector’s orientation toward mission
statements rather than market forces actually undermines their ability to focus on results.
• To push back and develop pragmatic plans for making a difference, nonprofit leaders should rigorously answer several interdependent
questions, suggested by the authors as a framework for change: Which results will we hold ourselves accountable for? How will we
achieve them? What will results really cost, and how can we fund them? How do we build the organization we need to deliver results?
• Successful organizations are willing to make hard trade-offs based on objective information to increase their impact.
HBR  nonprofit  effectiveness  performance  LBMA 
august 2012 by jerryking
Why not every product recall is total | ScrippsNews
By TERESA F. LINDEMAN
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
Monday, August 20, 2007
product_recalls  effectiveness  CPSC 
june 2012 by jerryking
"Measuring Recall Effectiveness"
September 9, 2003 | CPSC | U.S. CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION
CPSC  product_recalls  effectiveness 
june 2012 by jerryking
Must Reads: how to make your e-mails more appealing
Jul. 05, 2011 | The Globe and Mail | BARB SAWYERS
Most people in the business world receive 100 or more e-mails a day. To
stand out amid this flood of missives, you need to grab and hold the
attention of your recipients and persuade them to respond. Here are five
key tips to make your e-mails more effective:

(1) Focus the subject line; (2) Hook them from the start; (3) Keep it
focused – with an F; (4) Tell them what to do and why; (5)
Polish, shorten, then send
e-mail  Communicating_&_Connecting  effectiveness  information_overload 
september 2011 by jerryking
How Spider-Man Poisoned Its Own Prospects -
Mar. 11, 2011|BusinessWeek |By Rick Wartzman.

Jason Isaacs

Past performance doesn't necessarily guarantee future accomplishment, especially in a new job. "There is no reliable way to test or predict whether a person
successful in one area can make a successful transition to a different
environment," Drucker wrote. "This can be learned only by experience."
...One day, the senior partner called Drucker in. "I understand you did
very good securities analysis," the boss said. "But if we had wanted you
to do securities analysis work, we would have left you where you were.
You are now the executive secretary to the partners, yet you continue to
do securities analysis. What should you be doing now, to be effective
in your new job?" People stumble moving up the ladder because they
continue in their new assignment what made them successful in the old
assignment and what earned them the promotion...they turn
incompetent..because they are doing the wrong things."
first90days  Peter_Drucker  theatre  lessons_learned  directors  effectiveness  career  transitions  career_paths  new_graduates  movingonup  advice  Jason_Isaacs  past_performance  career_ending_moves 
march 2011 by jerryking
The New Normal - NYTimes.com
February 28, 2011 | NYT | By DAVID BROOKS. The U.S. is going
to be doing a lot of deficit cutting over the next several years. The
country’s future greatness will be shaped by whether those cuts are made
wisely or stupidly. Brooks proffers the following principles to guide
the cuts.
#1. Make Everybody Hurt. The sacrifice should be spread widely and
fairly.
#2. Make Conscious Tradeoffs. Trim from the old to invest in the young. We should adjust pension
promises and reduce the amount of $ spent on health care during the last
months of life so we can preserve programs for those who are growing
and learning the most.
# 3. Never cut without an evaluation process. Before legislators and
governors chop a section of the budget, they should make a list of all
the relevant programs, grading each option and then start paying for
them from the top down.
cutbacks  deficits  effectiveness  fairness  Octothorpe_Software  David_Brooks  municipalities  decision_making  austerity  sacrifice  new_normal  tradeoffs  priorities  assessments_&_evaluations 
march 2011 by jerryking
Tip Sheet: Advocacy Advertising: More Than Slightly Alive
Sep 22, 2008.! PR News. ! Anonymous. Cost-conscious clients
make the fatal error of thinking earned media is a better route because
it is free media, as opposed to advertising (paid media). The most
ambitious earned media campaign can be more expensive and less effective
as a well-thought-out ad campaign. No longer can a clients measure the
success of an advocacy campaign solely by the # of news hits. Because
clients love metrics, they are drawn to many of the newer online tactics
that crank out multiple reports about how their msg. fared on the Web.
But before anyone writes the obituary on print publications, they may
want to consider that lawmakers, especially on Capitol Hill, continue to
rely on must-read publications, including The Hill, The Politico,
National Journal and The Weekly Standard. An October 2007 Nielsen
study, "Trust in Advertising," noted that ads in newspapers ranked
second worldwide among all media categories.
ProQuest  advertising  advocacy  metrics  newspapers  cause_marketing  campaigns  effectiveness 
october 2010 by jerryking
How Charities Can Make Themselves More Open - WSJ.com
DECEMBER 10, 2007 WSJ article by SALLY BEATTY
* Charities and foundations should provide detailed information on their
Web sites -- everything from board members and their bios; problems
encountered trying to achieve their goals; how they measure their
effectiveness; embrace rigorous forms of evaluation and report their
findings to the public.
* Center on Philanthropy at Indiana University
assessments_&_evaluations  charities  donors  effectiveness  foundations  philanthropy  transparency 
february 2009 by jerryking

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