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jerryking : embryonic   5

Building a Platform for Growth
5/22/2006 | HBS Working Knowledge | by Donald L. Laurie,
Yves L. Doz, and Claude P. Sheer.
Sometimes building growth in mature industries means more than simple
product extensions or acquisitions. The answer? Develop "growth
platforms" that extend your business into new domains. An excerpt from
Harvard Business Review.
HBR  business_development  core_businesses  embryonic  growth  platforms  start_ups  spinups  product_strategy  product_extensions  growth_platforms  new_businesses  mature_industries 
february 2010 by jerryking
Toys 'R' History - WSJ.com
AUGUST 31, 2004 | Wall Street Journal | by CLAYTON M.
CHRISTENSEN and SCOTT D. ANTHONY. Today, Wal-Mart is going one better
than Toys "R" Us. With its mammoth stores, diverse array of products and
super-efficient supply chain, Wal-Mart can provide consumers good
quality, high levels of choice and convenience, and rock-bottom prices.
It has shifted the "basis of competition" from convenience to price.

So what can a company like Toys "R" Us do when signs emerge that the
basis of competition has shifted decisively in ways that make a
previously successful strategy ineffective? The truth is, if a company
facing this situation has not acted proactively before the signs become
conclusive, it is already too late. A company must sow the seeds of its
new growth business before the game palpably changes.
Clayton_Christensen  Scott_Anthony  Innosight  Toys_"R"_Us  Wal-Mart  growth  embryonic  emerging_markets  competitive_landscape 
january 2010 by jerryking
The Science Of Desire
JUNE 5, 2006 | BusinessWeek | By Spencer E. Ante, with Cliff
Edwards in San Mateo, Calif. Ethnographers, are a species of
anthropologist who can, among other things, identify what's missing in
people's lives -- the perfect cell phone, home appliance, or piece of
furniture -- and work with designers and engineers to help dream up
products and services to fill those needs.... The beauty of ethnography,
say its proponents, is that it provides a richer understanding of
consumers than does traditional research. Yes, companies are still using
focus groups, surveys, and demographic data to glean insights into the
consumer's mind. But closely observing people where they live and work,
say executives, allows companies to zero in on their customers'
unarticulated desires. Ethnographers' findings often don't lead to a
product or service, only a generalized sense of what people want. Their
research can also take a long time to bear fruit.
ethnography  consumer_research  market_entry  GE  emerging_markets  embryonic  anthropologists  anthropology  observations  unarticulated_desires 
january 2010 by jerryking
Create Your Own 'Big Bang' - WSJ.com
APRIL 6, 2004 | Wall Street Journal | By STEPHEN H. GOLDSTEIN.
How to spark and build a business ecosystem? following three approaches,
recently proven to be good starting points:

* Court a king. to win Wal-Mart over are standing at the head of the
line now.
* Advocate an ecosystem.
* Create a standard. In embryonic or fragmented markets, the way standards get set can be critical to the pace of market adoption and individual companies can usually play a role
in steering and setting standards.
growth  embryonic  start_ups  strategy  ecosystems  big_bang  measurements  standardization  technical_standards  jump-start  platforms  fragmented_markets  customer_adoption  market_risk  new_categories  howto  think_threes  category_killers  Play_Bigger 
january 2010 by jerryking

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