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jerryking : endurance   12

Grease the Groove — The Russian Military Secret to Strength Endurance
Mar 19, 2019 | Medium | John Fawkes.

The Grease the Groove program is completely different. This style of training breaks all of these rules. You lift light weights, you always stop before you get tired, and you train multiple times a day. Often you train more than 10 times a day.
Sound crazy? Sure. But it works. This style of training is popular with some of the world’s most elite trainers and military special operators.

How to Grease the Groove
Grease the Groove (GtG) training follows five principles:
1. It’s specific to a single movement. For example, you might do a grease-the-groove program focused on pull-ups.
2. The weights are light. Usually, you’re working with a resistance that’s light enough for you to do as many as 50 repetitions (although in this training you’ll stop short of that, because the point is not to train to the point of failure).
3. The total training volume is very high, often on the order of 5 to 20 sets per day, every day.
4. The sets are spread out across your day. You do one at a time and rest at least 15 to 30 minutes between sets. You don’t do several in quick succession, as you would in a normal workout.
5. Sets stop well short of the point of fatigue. Typically, for each set you’d do only 30 to 60 percent of the maximum number of repetitions you could do. So if you were doing a weight that you could lift 50 times, you might only do 15 repetitions in your set.

.......here’s something I don’t think I’ve ever heard anyone else talk about: Grease the Groove isn’t just for resistance training. You can use it to build endurance with athletic movements too.
What do I mean by athletic movements? Throwing a baseball. Throwing a punch. Kicking a soccer ball. Dribbling basketballs.
calisthenics  endurance  strength_training 
september 2019 by jerryking
Why Is Silicon Valley So Obsessed With the Virtue of Suffering?
March 26, 2019 | The New York Times | By Nellie Bowles.

a new entrepreneurship-focused lobbying firm, the Cicero Institute.
Daily Stoic, a popular blog for the tech-Stoic community.
“Meditations,” by Marcus Aurelius
“A Guide to the Good Life: The Ancient Art of Stoic Joy,” by William B. Irvine
Ryan Holiday’s life-hacking books on Stoicism.
Search for books by Ada Palmer.

The wealthy of Silicon Valley ought to be living their very best lives right now. John Doerr, an early Amazon and Google investor, calls their moment “the greatest legal accumulation of wealth in history.” And yet, the people of Silicon Valley seem determined to make themselves miserable. They sit in painful, silent meditations for weeks on end. They starve for days — on purpose. Cold morning showers are a bragging right. Notoriety is a badge of honor. So the most helpful clues to understanding Silicon Valley today may come from its favorite ancient philosophy: Stoicism. An ancient Greek school of thought, Stoicism argued that the only real treasures in life were inner virtues, like self-mastery and courage. The Stoics offered tactics to endure pain and pleasure without complaint.

* Is this really a thing? - Some executives in SV believe that our pleasing, on-demand life will make them soft. So they attempt to induce pain..... incorporate practices in our lives that “mimic” our ancestors’ environments and their daily challenges....Tim Ferriss wrote on his blog that Stoicism is “an ideal ‘operating system’ for thriving in high-stress environments.”.....there are the founders who may not call themselves Stoics, but who practice some of its tenets (e.g. Jack Dorsey, Twitter's C.E.O., who likes to walk five miles to work each day and meditates in silence 10 days each year.
* Why are they attracted to Stoicism? - Stoicism “a wonderful therapy against grief and the blinders of the rat race.” “So much of Stoicism is about achieving interior tranquillity,”
* Why does it matter? - The Cicero Institute comes at a time of tension in Silicon Valley.
books  courage  discomforts  emotional_mastery  endurance  founders  Greek  high-stress  inner-directed  inner_peace  John_Doerr  joyless  philosophy  Roman  Ryan_Holiday  self-deprivation  self-mastery  Silicon_Valley  Stoics  suffering  Tim_Ferris  tough-mindedness  virtues 
march 2019 by jerryking
The Best Type of Exercise to Burn Fat
Feb. 27, 2019 | The New York Times | By Gretchen Reynolds.

A few minutes of brief, intense exercise may be as effective as much lengthier walks or other moderate workouts for incinerating body fat.... super-short intervals could even, in some cases, burn more fat than a long walk or jog, but the effort involved needs to be arduous......high-intensity interval training, which typically involves a few minutes — or even seconds — of strenuous exertion followed by a period of rest, with the sequence repeated multiple times. Most H.I.I.T. workouts require less than half an hour, from beginning to end (including a warm-up and cool-down), and the strenuous portions of the workout are even briefer......studies show that interval workouts can improve aerobic fitness, blood sugar control, blood pressure and other measures of health and fitness to the same or a greater extent than standard endurance training, such as brisk walking or jogging, even if it lasts two or three times as long....the most common question..... is whether they also will aid in weight control and fat loss....Plan your workouts around your preferences and schedules, he says, and not concerns about which type of exercise might better trim fat.
aerobic  arduous  best_of  cardiovascular  exercise  fat-burning  fitness  high-impact  high-intensity  interval_training  endurance 
february 2019 by jerryking
Strengthen your glutes for better balance and less pain
November 1, 2017 | The Globe and Mail | KATHLEEN TROTTER.

Weak or inactive glutes – which are all too common – can contribute to lower back, hip, knee and ankle pain, not to mention reduced daily function and decreased endurance, strength and power.

The causes include excessive sitting (tight hip flexors), habituated improper loading patterns (over-recruitment of quads and lower back) and motor-control deficits. Even those who perform exercises that theoretically strengthen the glutes tend to unknowingly recruit other muscles.

How weak glutes can lead to injuries

Walking, jogging and running require hip extension – i.e., the leg moving backward to propel the body forward. The gluteus maximus is responsible for this motion. When you lack adequate hip extension, the body compensates, often by extending through the lower back or tilting the pelvis. These compensations stress the lower back, contributing to degenerative changes in the spine, muscle pain and an inefficient gait, and the pelvic tilt can cause the hamstrings to become over-lengthened and thus easily strained.

Pelvis stability impacts the knee. The femur makes up half the knee joint. The femur is controlled by pelvis muscles (primarily glutes). Thus, hip control is knee control. One common result of weak glutes is knee pain from an internally rotated femur that torques the knee.

How to activate and strengthen your glutes

1. Stretch your hip flexors, especially if you have a fairly sedentary lifestyle, which most of us do.

Sitting shortens hip flexors. Tight hip flexors inhibit the glutes. The bum can't fully engage when hip flexors are tight.

Lunge stretch: Step your left leg forward into a shallow lunge, both feet facing forward. Tuck your pelvis – your right hip bones should move toward your ribs. Feel a stretch up the front of your right thigh. Hold for 30 seconds or more. Switch sides.

2. "Activate" so you can integrate. Activation exercises "turn on" muscles that are not firing appropriately.

Isometric hip extensions: Tie a resistance band around your thighs. Lie on your right side, head supported, bottom leg bent, top leg straight and top hip long. Lift the top leg up and back in space slightly. Hold for 10 seconds. Initiate the motion from your bum. Release. Repeat for 10 reps. No band? Do the exercise without the band but hold for 30 seconds, working up to 60 seconds.

Band squats: Stand with a band tied around your thighs, feet slightly wider than shoulder width. Use the hip strategy outlined below to sit backward and imagine your sit bones widening as you squat. Hold for 10 seconds, engaging your bum to meet the tension of the band. Repeat 10 times. No band? Do body-weight squat holds for 20 seconds each.

The long-term goal is to integrate the now-active muscle into functional movement patterns such as squats. This way, motions that should theoretically work the glutes will actually work them. Do activation exercises daily until your bum is able to engage. Once activated, these exercises work well as part of a warm-up before training your lower body.

Utilize a "hip strategy" when squatting, lunging, performing step-ups, etc.

Hip strategy: This biases the glutes. To perform, lean up to 45 degrees forward, have a proportionally greater bend at the hip than the knee and when possible load the exercise from the back versus the front.

Knee strategy: This biases the quads. To perform, have an erect torso (shoulders over hips) and a proportionally larger bend at the knee versus the hip.

One strategy is not "good" and the other "bad." What you use depends on your goal. If you require stronger thighs, use the knee strategy. To get your glutes to join the party, use the hip strategy. Once your glutes are active, alternate strategies week to week.

Be mindful

The greatest predictor of future injury is previous injury. If you've had ankle, knee, hip or back injuries, don't wait for pain – pre-emptively train your glutes. Consider having an expert assess your overall movement mechanics. The body is a series of dominoes – every muscle and joint affect the muscles and joints above and below. To improve function and decrease rates of injury, work to understand your kinetic chain as a whole.

The goal of this program is to make unconsciously "active glutes" a new norm. I want your bum to work appropriately when you run, walk, sit or stand without you consciously deciding to use it. To make this a reality, purposeful thought – at least initially – is required. Turn your music off and stop chatting. Consider putting a hand on the muscle being worked. The brain responds well to tactile feedback. Concentrate on form and the muscles you're attempting to work.
endurance  exercise  fitness  glutes  squats  stretching  strength_training 
november 2017 by jerryking
The Best Exercise for Aging Muscles
MARCH 23, 2017 | The New York Times | By GRETCHEN REYNOLDS.

There were some unsurprising differences: The gains in muscle mass and strength were greater for those who exercised only with weights, while interval training had the strongest influence on endurance.

But more unexpected results were found in the biopsied muscle cells. Among the younger subjects who went through interval training, the activity levels had changed in 274 genes, compared with 170 genes for those who exercised more moderately and 74 for the weight lifters. Among the older cohort, almost 400 genes were working differently now, compared with 33 for the weight lifters and only 19 for the moderate exercisers.

Many of these affected genes, especially in the cells of the interval trainers, are believed to influence the ability of mitochondria to produce energy for muscle cells; the subjects who did the interval workouts showed increases in the number and health of their mitochondria — an impact that was particularly pronounced among the older cyclists.

It seems as if the decline in the cellular health of muscles associated with aging was “corrected” with exercise, especially if it was intense,
aging  endurance  exercise  fitness  high-impact  interval_training  strength_training 
april 2017 by jerryking
Stoics in Silicon Valley learn to manage disappointment
17 Dec. 2016 |Financial Times | Byline: Philip Delves Broughton.
* Stoicism is the new Zen, a rediscovered set of ideas that seem tailor-made for a period of rapid change.
* The Obstacle Is the Way: The Timeless Art of Turning Trials Into Triumph by Ryan Holiday
* Keep moving forward

History will one day tell us more about the meeting this week between Donald Trump and the biggest names in Silicon Valley. We will find out why these usually swagge...
books  disappointment  endurance  Jim_Collins  joyless  MLK  next_play  Philip_Delves_Broughton  rapid_change  Romans  Ryan_Holiday  Silicon_Valley  Stoics  suffering  tough-mindedness  Vietnam_War 
february 2017 by jerryking
Max Levchin of Affirm: Seeking the Endurance Athletes of Business - The New York Times
By ADAM BRYANT DEC. 9, 2016

one thing I have found over the years is that in hiring, the dominant characteristic I select for is this sense of perseverance in really tough situations. It’s like the difference between endurance athletes and sprinters. I think it is a really good predictor for how people behave under severe stress.

Working in a start-up means there is a baseline of stress with occasional spikes. There are people who are really good at handling spikes. In fact, most people are really good at handling spikes. But normal isn’t normal. There is constant stress. And so I look for endurance athletes, in the business sense.

And how do you test for that?

I ask about the longest stressful episode in your professional career. A lot of people talk about some all-nighter. Then I’ll say, “No, that may have been the highest stress moment, but what’s the longest period of stress you faced?”
Max_Levchin  endurance  Affirm  fin-tech  start_ups  entrepreneur  stressful  perseverance 
december 2016 by jerryking
Why It’s Not Enough Just to Be Disruptive - The New York Times
By JEREMY G. PHILIPS AUG. 10, 2016

Short-term success may be driven by exceptional execution; long-term value creation requires building a defensible model.

Any microeconomics textbook will tell you there are limited sources of competitive advantage. The most valuable companies combine several reinforcing strands, like scale and customer loyalty.....

While it is hard to stay ahead solely through superior execution over an extended period, it is sometimes enough in the short term to draw a deep-pocketed buyer where there are strong, immediate synergies. Creating enormous value over the long term requires turning a tactical edge into some form of durable advantage....Superior tactical execution can still create real value, particularly where it provides ammunition for a bigger war (like Walmart’s battle with Amazon). And in the long term, value is created not by disruption, but by weaving together advantages (as both Amazon and Walmart have done in different ways) that together create a barrier that is hard to storm.
disruption  value_creation  Gillette  competitive_advantage  execution  books  slight_edge  Amazon  Wal-Mart  microeconomics  short-term  long-term  barriers_to_entry  compounded  kaleidoscopic  unfair_advantages  endurance  synergies  M&A  mergers_&_acquisitions 
august 2016 by jerryking
Coming of Age, Whether They Like It or Not - The New York Times
By MEGAN RUBINER ZINN JANUARY 31, 2016

The various cultures that created coming-of-age rituals knew what they were doing, and it’s not surprising that the rituals have maintained a place in the modern world. At this cusp of the teen years, when kids are excited and afraid to be adults, when they try out new personalities by the day, when their sense of self may be dictated by their peers and the media, they have an accomplishment that is all theirs. It need not be a religious or cultural ritual, just a challenging, adult responsibility. In the case of a bar or bat mitzvah, kids take on something that is extraordinarily hard, something that requires persistence and focus for months, if not years, something that they may not want to do. And they do it, in front of their family and friends, and they do it very well. From there, no matter what challenges these kids meet: a difficult class, paper, exam, a scary responsibility, decision or action, they can look back on this day and remind themselves of what they accomplished when they were only 13.
Judaism  Jewish  rituals  aging  children  coming-of-age  persistence  arduous  focus  stressful  perseverance  endurance 
january 2016 by jerryking
Five key traits of successful consultants - The Globe and Mail
Harvey Schachter

Special to The Globe and Mail

Last updated Monday, Sep. 24 2012,

Intellectual Capacity

You have to be smart, well-trained and experienced – and have the educational credentials to back you up, be it an MBA or specialized training in your specific field of focus. “Competition for management consultants is likely to remain keen, and those with the most education and experience will have the best prospects,” she writes. Maturity and lots of contacts from a long career can be helpful; younger individuals have youth on their side but should expand their portfolio through as many varied experiences as possible.

Self-Confidence

You must be strong and confident about your abilities, but also low maintenance, ego in check. Although a hired hand for the organizations you work with, you must be a leader, motivating others and working in a collaborative way to nudge clients to solutions they might not have reached on their own.

Moxie

You need courage, energy, vision – and spunk. “It is the capacity to go against the common view, to walk into a room of fractious stakeholders who don’t support the evaluation and don’t want to hear about the findings. It is the ability to land in a strange town at midnight, scrape the snow and ice off your rental car, and locate your motel without the benefit of a map. It is being able to get up the day after you have lost the best proposal you have ever written and start all over again,” she notes.

Adaptability

Your work is defined by the rigid parameters set out by proposals and contracts, but you must still be light on your feet as you operate with the whole world in a state of flux. Try to keep your proposals more open-ended to handle unexpected issues that will inevitably crop up as you progress with your work.

Endurance

Some people enter the field viewing it as a stopgap between paid employment, while others view consulting as offering independence that will be a welcome relief to the stultifying atmosphere in the organizations where they have worked.
ksfs  Harvey_Schachter  management_consulting  self-confidence  personality_types/traits  character_traits  chutzpah  endurance  adaptability  individual_initiative  open-ended 
october 2012 by jerryking
The Young & Restless of Technology Finance
November 1993| The Red Herring | Anthony B. Perkins.

We think that marketing is everything. We try to help our companies figure out what is going to set them apart. We encourage companies to define their biggest risks-up front, work hard to put the risks behind them, and then move forward with very innovative marketing...During the interview process, you see whether entrepreneurs have passion and tenacity. The hardest thing to determine is their ability to stick-to-it. Entrepreneurs need to be very dynamic, wi11ing to adjust. And that's why an important part of our process is checking references, we have to be convinced the entrepreneur has never give up, even when things get tough. In other words, when Plan A work, because Plan A never works, we like to hear entrepreneurs say "That's O.K.,Plan B is on its way. I've twisted this valve and turned this knob and I really think we've figured it out." What we don't like to hear is "Well,it didn't work out...sorry." We also like to see entrepreneurs who are singularly focused on building -great products that fill distinct market needs. We are less interested in people who like nice digs, hype,and PR.

Moritz: ‘We have a very tight on making sure there is a sizable market opportunity in front. of us before we make an investment. We are much more focused on market growth potential and the ability for a company to reach a market successfully and profitably. We have also demonstrated as a firm and individually the ability to get companies off the ground with a small amount of fuel. We like to start wicked infernos with a single match rather than two million gallons of kerosene. This is clearly a differentiated way of getting a company put together. This approach has terrific benefits for the people who start the companies and for all our limited partners. You might say that we have a morbid fascination with our ROI, as opposed no the amount of dollars we put to work. And this is a very different message than you get from a lot of other venture firms.
The: HERRING: How often does a Sequoia partner actually go in and help operate a company?

Moritz: Pierre is the great unsung hero of Cisco Systems. He spent a tremendous amount of time at the company. working behind the scenes helping to make sure the engineering department was designing and getting new products to market. People don't realize the significant contribution Pierre made to Cisco because Don's name is on the hubcaps as the chairman of the company. The ability we have to help operate companies is a useful tool in our arsenal.

The HERRING: Sequoia's image on the streets of Silicon Valley is that you are the Los Angeles Raiders of venture capital--the tough guys who are quicker than the other firms to boot the CEO or pull the financial plug.
Moritz: We are congenitally incapable of pouring good money after bad. Some people. for their own will thrust us into a position to be harbingers of bad new to management, which is all right. But we do not want to continue propping up a company if we think its chances for success have evaporated. We would be wasting our money as individuals and wasting the money of our limited partners. There have been very few instances where we decided to stop funding a company and have regretted it.
The HERRING: What ’s the hardest part of your job?
Moritz: We usually don't make mistakes when it comes to assessing market opportunity. And we are reasonably accurate in predicting how long it will take to bring a product to market. The great imponderable is to judge accurately and predict how well a president is going to be able to run the business. It is easy to mistake the facade for reality
The HERRING: ‘What characteristics does Sequoia look for in a company president?
Moritz: Frugality, competitiveness. confidence, and paranoia.
venture_capital  vc  howto  Kleiner_Perkins  Sequoia  career_paths  Michael_Moritz  no_regrets  endurance  frugality  competitiveness  paranoia  self-confidence  market_sizing  market_windows  team_risk  market_opportunities  ambitions  large_markets  sticktoitiveness  entrepreneur  perseverance  indispensable  Plan_B  off-plan  champions  reference-checking  unknowns  assessments_&_evaluations  opportunities  unsentimental  wishful_thinking  illusions  overambitious 
july 2012 by jerryking
Beet It - To Exercise Longer, Try Beetroot Juice - NYTimes.com
October 2, 2010 | By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS. the high nitrate
content of beetroot juice is responsible for its athletic benefits.
Scientists aren't exactly sure how it works, but suspect having more
nitric oxide in your body, a byproduct of nitrate, helps you exercise
with less oxygen. Bailey said the same effects might be possible if
people ate more nitrate-rich foods like beetroot, lettuce or spinach.

Bailey and colleagues calculated beetroot juice could translate into a 1
to 2 percent better race time, a tiny improvement likely only to matter
to elite athletes. They are still tweaking the dosage but say athletes
should consume the juice a few hours before training so their body has
time to digest it. Their latest study was published in June in the
Journal of Applied Physiology.
beverages  diets  endurance  exercise  juices  nutrition  running  sports_drinks 
october 2010 by jerryking

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