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jerryking : energy   61

The myth of green growth
October 24, 2019 | | Financial Times | by Simon Kuper.

voters tend to place their personal interests ahead of their political ideals.
aviation  carbon_emissions  climate_catastrophe  climate_change  de-growth  electric_cars  energy  environment  fuel-efficiency  green  growth  myths  One_Belt_One_Road  reality_checks  renewable  shipping  Simon_Kuper  society  tradeoffs  William_Jevons 
october 2019 by jerryking
Canada doomed to be branch plant for global tech giants unless Ottawa updates thinking, Balsillie warns | Financial Post
James McLeod
November 16, 2018
7:27 PM EST

Canadian governments need to radically rethink their approach to the knowledge economy if the country is to be anything more than a branch plant for global technology giants,.......“I think they confuse a cheap jobs strategy … (and) foreign branch plant pennies with innovation billions,” .........Balsillie has argued that the “intangible” economy of data, software and intellectual property is fundamentally different from the classical industrial economy built on the trade of goods and services, and that because Canadian policymakers fail to understand that difference, they keep being taken for rubes.......Balsillie was particularly critical of the federal government’s policy when it comes to “branch plant” investments in Canada in the technology sector.

He said that in the traditional economy of goods and services, foreign direct investment (FDI) is a good thing, because there’s a multiplier effect — $100 million for a new manufacturing plant or an oil upgrader might create $300 million in spinoff economic activity.

But if you’re just hiring programmers to write software, the picture is different, he said. It’s a much smaller number of jobs with fewer economic benefits, and, more importantly, the value created through intellectual property flows out of the country.

“Our FDI approaches have been the same for the intangibles, where, when you bring these companies in, they put a half a dozen people in a lab, they poach the best talent and they poach the IP, and then you lose all the wealth effects,”....“Don’t get me wrong. I believe in open economies. They’re going to come here anyway; I just don’t know why we give them the best talent, give them our IP, give them tax credits for the research, give them the red carpet for government relations, don’t allow them to pay taxes, and then have all the wealth flow out of the country.”...if small countries such as Canada make a point of prioritizing the intangible economy, there are huge opportunities. He pointed to Israel, Finland and Singapore as examples of how smart policies and specialization can reap big rewards.

“I could literally see enormously powerful positions for Canada if we choose the right places. I mean, there are some obvious ones: value added in the food business, and precision data and IP in agriculture; certainly in energy extraction and mining, which are data and technology businesses,” he said.

“We actually have enormous opportunities to build the resilience and opportunity,” he said. ”And how can you threaten a country with a picture of a Chevy and 25 per cent tariffs when you’ve built these kinds of very powerful innovation infrastructures that you can’t stop with a tariff because they move with the click of a mouse?”
agriculture  branch_plants  Canada  data  digital_economy  energy  FDI  Finland  food  GoC  industrial_economy  IP_retention  intangibles  intellectual_property  Israel  Jim_Balsillie  mining  policymakers  property_rights  protocols  Singapore  talent  technology  wealth_effects 
november 2018 by jerryking
GE: industrial stalwart contemplates a general overhaul
OCTOBER 5, 2018 | Financial Times | by Ed Crooks in New York.

“GE Power is at death’s door,” says Scott Davis, an analyst at Melius Research. “It’s going to require a massive change in strategy to fix it.”

The Alstom deal is far from being GE’s only strategic mis-step. But it is emblematic of two of the company’s flaws: a weakness for dealmaking, and an inability to respond effectively to a changing market. Together, those failings go a long way to explaining why one of the greatest names in American business, an original member of the Dow Jones Industrial Average at its creation in 1896, has lost more than 80 per cent of its market capitalisation since 2000......while GE’s leaders were focused on a deal that might have been perfect 10 or 20 years ago, they were underestimating the scale of the changes hitting the electricity industry. As the costs of wind and solar power have plunged, they have become competitive against the gas-fired and coal-fired power plants that are GE and Alstom’s forte. It is a mistake that companies often make at times of structural change, says Kingsmill Bond of the Carbon Tracker Initiative: “They confused the current size of the market with the future growth of the market.”.....As the scale of the problem emerged, Mr Flannery moved to cut costs. Last December he announced 12,000 jobs would go from the power division. But reducing headcount is slow work in Europe, especially in France, where Mr Immelt had pledged to create a net 1,000 additional jobs by the end of 2018......The urgency of the crisis creates opportunities to make radical changes. A group of investors including hedge fund manager Sir Christopher Hohn of the Children’s Investment Fund on Friday published a letter to Mr Culp, urging him to scale back investment in gas and coal power and embrace clean energy.....Giving up on selling new turbines to concentrate on the more lucrative services business would be a momentous step, but Mr Davis says that like General Motors during the 2008 financial crisis, the business is in urgent need of a radical rethink.
Alstom  CEOs  change  cost-cutting  deal-making  DJIA  energy  GE  Jack_Welch  Jeffrey_Immelt  shifting_tastes  Siemens  structural_change  John_Flannery  exits 
october 2018 by jerryking
Google and Repsol team up to boost oil refinery efficiency
June 3, 2018 | Financial Times | Anjli Raval in London YESTERDAY

Repsol will use Cloud ML, Google’s machine learning tool, to optimise the performance of its 120,000 barrel-a-day Tarragona oil refinery on the east coast of Spain, near Barcelona.

A refinery is made up of multiple divisions, including the unit that distils crude into various components to be processed into fuels such as gasoline and diesel and the entity that converts heavy residual oils into lighter, more valuable products.

Google’s technology will be used to analyse hundreds of variables that measure pressure, temperature, flows and processing rates among other functions for each unit at Tarragona. Repsol hopes this will boost margins by 30 cents per barrel at the facility and plans to roll out the technologies across its five other refineries.

Energy companies are increasingly looking to use the type of analytics often employed by companies such as Google and Amazon for consumer data across their operations, from boosting the performance of drilling rigs to helping to deliver greater returns from refineries.

“Until very recently, [oil and gas] companies have not had the tools or the capabilities needed to operate these assets at their maximum capacity,” McKinsey, the professional services firm, said in a recent report. “Analytics tools and techniques have advanced far and fast.”
artificial_intelligence  efficiencies  energy  Google  oil_industry  oil_refiners  Silicon_Valley  Repsol  tools  machine_learning 
june 2018 by jerryking
Windfall, by Meghan O’Sullivan
Windfall: How the New Energy Abundance Upends Global Politics and Strengthens America’s Power, by Meghan L O’Sullivan, Simon and Schuster $29.00

the shale revolution has meant the US has become a leading global oil producer and net exporter of natural gas. Extraction from shale rock has upended global oil and gas markets, but could also have geopolitical ramifications. For most of the 20th century, western powers were locked in a scramble for oil across the globe. So what happens when technology unlocks substantial supply on home turf?

According to Meghan O’Sullivan, a professor at the Harvard Kennedy School, the answer is a geopolitical shift that should benefit the US. She provides a powerful argument for how America should capitalize on the “New Energy Abundance”. Having a domestic supply of oil and gas not only strengthens the US economy, it can also provide leverage globally......US gas has transferred low prices to Europe and also offers an alternative source of supply. That “has helped make Europe less vulnerable to one of Russia’s longstanding foreign policy tools — the political manipulation of natural gas markets”, O’Sullivan writes......the book details the benefits to US “hard” as well as “soft” power,....It will not lead to reduced US involvement in the Middle East, .....Nor can the US ever be self-sufficient to provide all the oil it needs,.....The book points out that energy is likely to be a major future determinant of geopolitics....China’s One Belt One Road project shows Xi Jinping’s intent to change the strategic orientation of the Eurasian landmass......a challenge to O’Sullivan’s thesis is that renewables and electric vehicles could drive seismic shifts. If China becomes the Saudi Arabia of batteries, will this give it greater influence? What about those who control the raw materials needed, from lithium to cobalt? O’Sullivan hints at this in her introduction, saying we should expect renewables “eventually to have major repercussions for global politics”. These could include cartels around lithium or the state collapse of some oil producers.
nonfiction  books  fracking  energy  natural_gas  soft_power  policy_tools  shale_oil  hydraulic_fracturing  pipelines  oil_industry  geopolitics  renewable  electric_cars  batteries  One_Belt_One_Road  Xi_Jinping 
december 2017 by jerryking
We are still waiting for the robot revolution
2017 | Financial Times | Tim Harford.

“Our chief economic problem right now isn’t that the robots are taking our jobs, it’s that the robots are slacking off. “

Or at least — it should. Our chief economic problem right now isn’t that the robots are taking our jobs, it’s that the robots are slacking off. We suffer from slow productivity growth; the symptoms are not lay-offs but slow-growing economies and stagnant wages. In advanced economies, total factor productivity growth — a measure of how efficiently labour and capital are being used to produce goods and services — was around 2 per cent a year in the 1960s, when the ATM was introduced. Since then, it has averaged closer to 1 per cent a year; since the financial crisis it has been closer to zero. Labour productivity, too, has been low.

Plenty of jobs, but lousy productivity: imagine an economy that was the exact opposite of one where the robots took over, and it would look very much like ours. Why? Tempting as it may be to blame the banks, a recent working paper by John Fernald, Robert Hall and others argues that productivity growth stalled before the financial crisis, not afterwards: the promised benefits of the IT revolution petered out by around 2006. Perhaps the technology just isn’t good enough; perhaps we haven’t figured out how to use it. In any case, results have been disappointing.

There is always room for the view that the productivity boom is imminent. Michael Mandel and Bret Swanson, business economists, argue in their policy paper that we are starting to find digitally driven efficiencies in physical industries such as energy, construction, transport, and retail. If this happens, Silicon Valley-style innovation will ripple through the physical economy. If.
Tim_Harford  artificial_intelligence  productivity  automation  economists  efficiencies  energy  construction  transportation  retailers  robotics  physical_economy  data_driven 
august 2017 by jerryking
The Race to Solar-Power Africa | The New Yorker
June 26, 2017 Issue
The Race to Solar-Power Africa
American startups are competing to bring electricity to communities that remain off the grid.

By Bill McKibben
Africa  energy  solar  green  start_ups  renewable  alternative_energy  power_grid 
july 2017 by jerryking
To Be a Genius, Think Like a 94-Year-Old - The New York Times
Pagan Kennedy APRIL 7, 2017

Pagan Kennedy is the author of “Inventology: How We Dream Up Things That Change the World”

it’s easy for us middle-aged folk to believe that the great imaginative leaps are behind us, and that innovation belongs to the kids.

On the contrary, there’s plenty of evidence to suggest that late blooming is no anomaly. A 2016 Information Technology and Innovation Foundation study found that inventors peak in their late 40s and tend to be highly productive in the last half of their careers. Similarly, professors at the Georgia Institute of Technology and Hitotsubashi University in Japan, who studied data about patent holders, found that, in the United States, the average inventor sends in his or her application to the patent office at age 47, and that the highest-value patents often come from the oldest inventors — those over the age of 55.....The more I talked to Dr. Goodenough, the more I wondered if his brilliance was directly tied to his age. After all, he has been thinking about energy problems longer than just about anyone else on the planet.....“I’m old enough to know you can’t close your mind to new ideas. You have to test out every possibility if you want something new.”

When I asked him about his late-life success, he said: “Some of us are turtles; we crawl and struggle along, and we haven’t maybe figured it out by the time we’re 30. But the turtles have to keep on walking.” This crawl through life can be advantageous, he pointed out, particularly if you meander around through different fields, picking up clues as you go along. .... The tapestry reminds him of the divine power that fuels his mind. “I’m grateful for the doors that have been opened to me in different periods of my life,” he said. He believes the glass battery was just another example of the happy accidents that have come his way: “At just the right moment, when I was looking for something, it walked in the door.”
physics  batteries  energy  creativity  biases  patents  midlife  genius  aging  late_bloomers 
april 2017 by jerryking
NRStor puts hopes in compressed air energy storage project - The Globe and Mail
SHAWN MCCARTHY - GLOBAL ENERGY REPORTER
OTTAWA — The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Jun. 23, 2015
green  energy 
june 2015 by jerryking
Canada’s all about energy … to send elsewhere - The Globe and Mail
JEFFREY SIMPSON
The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Dec. 24 2014

Natural resources such as energy are provincially owned with national implications. Where we sell, to whom and for what prices, and how we exploit the resources have fiscal-policy and sometimes foreign-policy implications. Natural resources contribute to the country’s standard of living, and to regional differences, which Ottawa through equalization is charged with trying to flatten.

A “Canadian energy for Canadians” approach would not see Uncle Ottawa bullying its way into provincial jurisdiction. Rather, it would invite the federal government to suggest to provinces that it stands ready to assist them financially in projects that would move Canadian energy across the country.

Think about hydroelectricity. We don’t have anything like a national grid in Canada. We don’t even have effective regional grids, but rather bits and pieces of regional grids. We’ve got highways and train tracks linking the heartlands of Quebec and Ontario, but we don’t have an energy corridor from surplus-producing Quebec to Ontario.
Jeffrey_Simpson  energy  natural_resources  hydroelectric  federal-provincial_relations  power_grid  electric_power 
december 2014 by jerryking
White House to Begin $10 Billion Rural Investment Fund - NYTimes.com
By ALEXANDRA STEVENSON JULY 24, 2014

The White House Rural Council will announce plans on Thursday to start a $10 billion investment fund that will give pension funds and large investors the opportunity to invest in agricultural projects. Those include wastewater systems, energy projects and infrastructure development in rural America.

“We’re the eHarmony.com of infrastructure and business investment,”...The move comes as pension funds and institutional investors, faced with few investment opportunities that yield high returns in the face of low interest rates, have begun to shift large amounts of money into less traditional investments that promise bigger returns like hedge funds and private equity firms.
farmland  agriculture  agribusiness  rural  alternative_investments  private_equity  infrastructure  investing  energy  wastewater-treatment  institutional_investors  pension_funds 
july 2014 by jerryking
Gas deal with Russia a ‘drop in the bucket’ for China
May. 24 2014 | The Globe and Mail | Campbell Clark.

Why? Nearly all growth in demand for energy will come from emerging economies, but especially China. Its needs will shape global prices. If it suffers shortages, or supplies are at risk, it will send price shocks through world markets.

That would hit the U.S. economy – because “we pay global prices,” Mr. Pascual said. And a U.S. slowdown would hurt Canada, even if energy exporters benefit from price spikes.

There are also critical questions of how energy affects geopolitics, made sharper in the Ukraine-Russia crisis. Moscow has used energy as a political lever, shutting pipelines to Ukraine, while Europe’s dependence on Russian gas has cooled drives to tougher economic sanctions.

Mr. Pascual, however, believes Europe’s example offers hope in preventing a nation from using energy as a political lever in Asia.

Europeans invested in infrastructure so natural gas can flow in different directions, rather than just westward from Russia. They banned “destination clauses” so Russia’s Gazprom can no longer bar customers from re-exporting gas. That promotes competition, and allows Ukraine to get gas through Poland, Hungary and Slovakia, Mr. Pascual said. Europe is also building infrastructure for liquid natural gas, shipped from places like Qatar.
natural_gas  Russia  China  geopolitics  energy  energy_security  LNG  Asian  price_hikes  Gazprom  optionality  petro-politics 
may 2014 by jerryking
Canada heading for energy ‘gridlock,’ group warns - The Globe and Mail
Dec. 12 2013 |The Globe and Mail |SHAWN McCARTHY.

Canada is heading for a gridlock in energy development that will rob the country of future wealth unless it can solve vexing environmental and aboriginal conflicts, a blue-ribbon group including senior Calgary business people warns in a new report.

Concerned about growing conflict over resource development, 21 high-profile leaders from business, environmental organizations and First Nations met over the course of a year and concluded there is an urgent need for detente in the country’s heated debate over resource development.
Alberta  energy  aboriginals  Calgary  Canada  gridlock  energy_development  resource_development  natural_resources  anti-development  environment 
december 2013 by jerryking
It’s a big fracking world out there, and people are getting angry - The Globe and Mail
Jun. 21 2013 | The Globe and Mail | By Shawn McCarthy who reviews The Power Surge: Energy, Opportunity and the Battle for America’s Future
by Author Michael Levi.

Levi suggests a grand bargain: Environmentalists should focus less on “stopping things” and more on building support for legislation that will create incentives to cut consumption of coal, oil and, eventually, natural gas. Industry should encourage market-based incentives to reduce carbon emissions and accept reasonable regulation, even as they pursue greater domestic oil and gas production.


Published Friday, , 12:00 AM EDT

Last updated Friday, Jun. 21 2013,
energy  book_reviews  books  natural_gas  natural_resources  fracking  shale_oil  hydraulic_fracturing  pipelines  oil_industry 
june 2013 by jerryking
Moolah from heaven
July 24, 2007 | G&M | BY MARJO JOHNE
funding  angels  energy 
march 2013 by jerryking
Making Data Visible So You Can Act On It
December 11, 2012 | MIT Sloan Management Review |John Schulz (AT&T), interviewed by Nina Kruschwitz...

At AT&T, John Schulz, a director of sustainability operations, first had to make the company’s energy and water use data visible before the company could establish a program to reduce those numbers....The visibility of that data is what really drives behavior, because it’s shared with their peers, who the facility managers want to do well among, and with upper management. We found the scorecard model to be very useful, both for choosing the right points of data and then for making them visible. That was a real turning point for us.
data  sustainability  water_footprints  leadership  visibility  interviews  AT&T  energy  energy_efficiency  MIT  turning_points 
january 2013 by jerryking
As Natural-Gas Bills Rise, Landlords Face a Choice - WSJ.com
March 12, 2003 | WSJ | By RAY A. SMITH | Staff Reporter of THE WALL STREET JOURNAL.
natural_gas  volatility  energy  pricing 
january 2013 by jerryking
Only Harper can end pipeline politicking
Jul. 30 2012 | The Globe and Mail | JOHN IBBITSON.

A good chunk of Canada’s future economic growth hinges on exporting energy, with increased exports from the oil sands a crucial component of that growth. Enter the Prime Minister – that is, if he’s willing to take the cue.

For 45 years, Canadian politics was largely defined as an ongoing series of conflicts between Ottawa and the provinces: over national social programs under Lester B. Pearson; over repatriating the Constitution and Quebec separatism under Pierre Trudeau; over fixing the Constitution under Brian Mulroney; over renewed fears of separation under Jean Chrétien; over funding health care under Mr. Chretien and Paul Martin.

Enough, said Stephen Harper. His strategy as prime minister has been to leave the provinces alone. The best example is the Conservatives’ approach to health care. With the current funding formula set to expire in 2014, all 14 capitals were gearing up for months of negotiations. A source says that in the Finance Department, the Prime Minister’s Office and the Privy Council Office, advisers pored over the various strategies, every one of which was complicated, cumbersome and politically controversial.

Then someone suggested: Let’s just give them the money with a reasonable annual increase, and no strings attached. Mr. Harper seized the proposal. No national standards, no reporting mechanism and, best of all, no first ministers’ meeting, in which 13 premiers lock a prime minister in a room and grill him until he gives up the combination to the safe.
energy  Stephen_Harper  John_Ibbitson  pipelines  oil_sands 
july 2012 by jerryking
Oil guru points to substitutes keeping lid on energy prices
Apr. 19 2010 | Globe and Mail | DAVID PARKINSON.

"Essentially, all forecasting, no matter what's being forecast, is a straight-line extrapolation of what has been experienced very recently," he said in an interview in Toronto yesterday.

"All of our work is aimed at forecasting changes of direction and discontinuity, because that is the reality of the world. For the last several decades, our forecasts are nearly always this contrast with the consensus."
oil_industry  pricing  energy  substitution  forecasting  straight-lines  discontinuities  extrapolations  step_change  linearity 
june 2012 by jerryking
‘America is still in denial about energy’ - FT.com
July 25, 2005 8:33 pm
‘America is still in denial about energy’

By Christopher Swann
U.S.  energy 
june 2012 by jerryking
I'm Putting My Money Where the Soft Power Is - WSJ.com
February 8, 2005 | WSJ | Amory B. Lovins,CEO, Rocky Mountain Institute
Snowmass, Colo.
letters_to_the_editor  energy  entrepreneur  Amory_Lovins  soft_power 
may 2012 by jerryking
Take the Subway - NYTimes.com
March 3, 2012 | NYT | By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN.

Two recent, smart books. The first is called “The Sixth Wave: How to Succeed in a Resource Limited World,” by James Bradfield Moody and Bianca Nogrady. Moody, who works at Australia’s national research agency, and Nogrady, a science journalist, argue that, since the industrial revolution, we’ve seen five long waves of innovation — from water power to steam to electrification to mass production and right up to information and communications technologies. They argue the sixth wave will be resource efficiency — because rising populations, with growing appetites, will lead to both increasing scarcity of resources and dangerously high pollution, waste and climate change.

This will force us to decouple consumption from economic growth.

Amory Lovins, the physicist who is chairman of the Rocky Mountain Institute, begins in his new book, “Reinventing Fire: Bold Business Solutions for the New Energy Era,” which is summarized in the current Foreign Affairs. The Rocky Mountain Institute and its business collaborators show how private enterprise — motivated by profit, supported by smart policy — can lead America off both oil and coal by 2050, saving $5 trillion, through innovation emphasizing design and strategy.

“You don’t have to believe in climate change to solve it,” says Lovins. “Everything we do to raise energy efficiency will make money, improve security and health, and stabilize climate.”
Amory_Lovins  books  climate_change  constraints  economic_growth  electric_power  energy  energy_efficiency  Moscow  physicists  pollution  resource_efficiency  scarcity  steam_engine  sustainability  Tom_Friedman  waste  water_power 
march 2012 by jerryking
Fly Me to the Moon
December 5, 2004 | NYT | By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN...."give me an America that is energy-independent and I will give you sharply reduced oil revenues for the worst governments in the world. I will give you political reform from Moscow to Riyadh to Tehran. Yes, deprive these regimes of the huge oil windfalls on which they depend and you will force them to reform by having to tap their people instead of oil wells. These regimes won't change when we tell them they should. They will change only when they tell themselves they must....If President Bush made energy independence his moon shot, he would dry up revenue for terrorism; force Iran, Russia, Venezuela and Saudi Arabia to take the path of reform - which they will never do with $45-a-barrel oil - strengthen the dollar; and improve his own standing in Europe, by doing something huge to reduce global warming. He would also create a magnet to inspire young people to contribute to the war on terrorism and America's future by becoming scientists, engineers and mathematicians. "This is not just a win-win," said the Johns Hopkins foreign policy expert Michael Mandelbaum. "This is a win-win-win-win-win."
career_paths  deprivations  energy  energy_independence  energy_security  engineering  mathematics  moonshots  NSF  oil_industry  petro-politics  SAIS  STEM  Tom_Friedman  win-win  youth  young_people 
january 2012 by jerryking
The Return of ‘Drill, Baby, Drill’ - NYTimes.com
May 6, 2011 | NYT | editorial. With the country again facing
$4-a-gallon gasoline, the time would seem ripe for a grown-up
conversation on energy. What we are getting instead is a mindless rerun
of the drill-baby-drill operatics of the 2008 campaign, when gas was
also at $4 a gallon. Then, as now, opportunistic politicians insisted
that vastly expanded oil drilling would bring relief at the pump and
reduced dependence on foreign oil. Then, as now, these arguments were
bogus. As President Obama observed in a March 30 address on energy
issues, drilling alone cannot possibly ensure energy independence in a
country that uses one-quarter of the world’s oil while owning only 2
percent of its reserves. Nor can it lower prices, except at the margins.
Only coordinated measures — greater auto efficiency, alternative fuels,
improved mass transit — can address these issues.
industrial_policies  energy  alternative_energy 
may 2011 by jerryking
Obama signals new reliance on oil sands
Mar. 30, 2011| The Globe and Mail | SHAWN McCARTHY — GLOBAL ENERGY REPORTER,
energy  consumption  U.S.  infographics  oil_sands  Obama 
april 2011 by jerryking
Energy Lessons from Ancient Rome -
Jan. 20, 2011| BusinessWeek| By Alessandra Migliaccio &
Flavia Rotondi. The ancient Romans used water pressure to bring the
city's monumental baths and fountains to life. Flavio and Valerio
Andreoli are using it to produce clean power. Encouraged by generous
renewable energy incentives, their company, Hydrowatt, specializes in
generating electricity from turbines in aqueducts. ..The brothers tap
into modern water pipelines that follow the same routes as the old
aqueducts. Like ancient engineers who studied the land seeking sources
at higher elevations to provide the pressure needed to reach Rome,
Hydrowatt's engineers seek out places where pipelines have valves
designed to release excess pressure as the water flows rapidly down the
mountainsides. Once they identify such a site, the brothers offer local
authorities that control the aqueducts a deal to replace the valves with
Hydrowatt's turbines.
water  hydroelectric  energy  cleantech  green  Italian  start_ups  Romans  electric_power  water_power 
february 2011 by jerryking
Will Canada play energy card in a U.S.-China world? - The Globe and Mail
Campbell Clark
From Thursday's Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Jan. 19, 2011
China  Canada  U.S.  energy 
january 2011 by jerryking
Toward a New American Century - WSJ.com
OCTOBER 7, 2010 Wall Street Journal by Michael Milken. Despite
high unemployment, declining education standards and greater
competition from China and other countries, we can extend America's
pre-eminence long into the future if the public and private sectors—and
all of us as individuals—assume greater responsibility for our common
destiny.

Six areas in particular provide opportunities for positive change:

• Housing. • Entitlements. • Education. • Health.• Immigration.• Energy.
Michael_Milken  immigration  human_capital  education  energy  entitlements  housing 
october 2010 by jerryking
The man who’s tutoring Bill Gates
June 19, 2010 | The Globe and Mail | Margaret Wente. Discusses
Vaclav Smil at the University of Manitoba. Prof. Smil’s 24th book,
Global Catastrophes and Trends: The Next 50 Years, has just been
published in Canada. It offers a numbers-heavy but compact guide to all
the main things we should be worrying about (or not), from natural
disasters to population trends.
billgates  books  Canada  catastrophes  catastrophic_risk  disasters  energy  environment  Margaret_Wente  natural_calamities  politics  worrying 
june 2010 by jerryking
Lamar Alexander: An Energy Strategy for Grown-Ups - WSJ.com
JUNE 11, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By LAMAR ALEXANDER
energy  policy  strategy 
june 2010 by jerryking
Op-Ed Columnist - The Green Revolution(s)
June 23, 2009 | NYTimes.com | By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN. Launching a
real Green Revolution in America would be the best way to support the
“Green Revolution” in Iran. Negotiate when one has leverage. “The First
Law of Petro-Politics,” stipulates that the price of oil and the pace
of freedom in petrolist states — states totally dependent on oil exports
to run their economies — operate in an inverse correlation.
reform  Iran  petro-politics  Tom_Friedman  Ahmadinejad  energy 
july 2009 by jerryking
The Power of Green - NYTimes.com
April 15, 2007 | New York Times | By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN
renewable  energy  Tom_Friedman  alternative_energy  green 
may 2009 by jerryking
Energy-Efficient Lighting Shines With Investors
Sep 5, 2007 Wall Street Journal. (Eastern edition). New York, N.Y.: . pg. B.3A by Jonathan Shieber.
energy  electric_lights  inefficiencies  lighting 
march 2009 by jerryking
Scum Power - WSJ.com
JUNE 30, 2008 WSJ article By RUSSELL GOLD. Challenges of commericalizing algae into fuel.
alternative_energy  energy  algae  commercialization 
february 2009 by jerryking
Shedding Light on Solar - WSJ.com
JUNE 30, 2008 WSJ article By YULIYA CHERNOVA explaining why solar is so expensive. Polysilicon.
alternative_energy  solar  energy 
february 2009 by jerryking
A Little Knowledge... - WSJ.com
JUNE 30, 2008 WSJ article by Rebecca Smith. If consumers know how much electricity they're using, they don't consume as much.
smart_meters  energy  demand_response  Rebecca_Smith 
february 2009 by jerryking
Smaller, Smarter - WSJ.com
Feb. 11, 2008 WSJ article by Guy Chazan on product ideas that
supply light and power to remote areas of less developed countries
(LDCs). Some of the power-generation approaches are "off-grid".
off-grid  LDCs  energy  policy  UNDP  alternative_energy  3rdWorld  ideas  power_generation  size  developing_countries 
february 2009 by jerryking
Nine Cities, Nine Ideas - WSJ.com
Feb. 11, 2008 WSJ article by Jim Carlton looking at innovative
programs nine cities around the world are using to keep their energy
consumption--and their skyrocketing bills--under control.
cities  climate_change  environment  city  energy  green  urban 
february 2009 by jerryking
The New Math of Alternative Energy - WSJ.com
Feb. 12, 2007 WSJ article by Rebecca Smith on how the calculus
of whether to invest in renewable energy is starting to look less
daunting as oil and gas prices rise.
cleantech  energy  economics  alternative_energy  wind_power  intermittency  solar  biomass  geothermal  biofuels  renewable 
february 2009 by jerryking
To Cut Fuel Bills, Try High-Tech Help - WSJ.com
March 11, 2008 WSJ article by Jim Carlton on green software being deployed to help business customers manage their energy use.
energy  software  start_ups 
january 2009 by jerryking
OSEA: The Wall Street Journal - Ontario Invests in Green Energy
October 29, 2008 | Wall Street Journal | by Hyun Young Lee. on the Next Generation of Jobs Fund
Ontario  alternative_energy  energy  public_sector  economic_development  green  renewable 
january 2009 by jerryking
William Tucker: Carbon Limits, Yes; Energy Subsidies, No - WSJ.com
Tucker argues against allowing the proceeds of an emissions tax to be used to subsidize various forms of renewable energy.
energy  carbon  nuclear  subsidies 
january 2009 by jerryking

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