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jerryking : enforcement   7

Where Have All the Black-Owned Businesses Gone? - The Atlantic
BRIAN S. FELDMAN MAY 1, 2017

The last 30 years also have brought the wholesale collapse of black-owned independent businesses and financial institutions that once anchored black communities across the country. In 1985, 60 black-owned banks were providing financial services to their communities; today, just 23 remain. In 11 states where black-owned banks had headquarters in 1994, not a single one is still in business. Of the 50 black-owned insurance companies that operated during the 1980s, today just two remain.

Over the same period, tens of thousands of black-owned retail establishments and local service companies also have disappeared, having gone out of business or been acquired by larger companies. Reflecting these developments, working-age black Americans have become far less likely to be their own boss than in the 1990s. The per-capita number of black employers, for example, declined by some 12 percent just between 1997 and 2014.......the decline in entrepreneurship and business ownership among black Americans also is cause for concern. ...market concentration has played a role in suppressing opportunity and in displacing local economies. ...........The role of market concentration in inhibiting black-owned businesses is also troubling because of the critical role that such enterprises have played in organizing and financing the struggle for civil rights in America......The decline of black-owned independent businesses traces back to many causes, but a major one that has been little noted was the decline in the enforcement of anti-monopoly and fair-trade laws beginning in the late 1970s......Bob Dickerson, the CEO of the Birmingham Business Resource Center in Alabama, says, “Had our institutions and businesses been maintained, had that money been plowed back into our communities, it could have meant a world of difference.”

The role of market concentration in driving down the number of black-owned independent businesses becomes all the more concerning when one considers some mostly forgotten history. In principles, people, and tactics, the fight for black civil rights, going back to before the Civil War, was often deeply intertwined and aligned with America’s anti-monopoly traditions......The story of how the struggle for civil rights intertwined and intersected historically with the struggle against monopoly provides a lesson for the future. It suggests a need to recognize how political independence connects with economic independence in the struggle for social justice. Without freedom from domination in one sphere, there is no freedom in the other.
African-Americans  anticompetitive_behaviour  anti-monopoly  antitrust  black-owned  business  civil_rights  collapse-anxiety  corporate_concentration  economic_clout  economic_inclusion  economic_independence  enforcement  fair-trade  Jim_Crow  market_concentration  market_power  New_Deal  political_independence  segregation  societal_collapse 
may 2017 by jerryking
The Fast Lane: Revisiting last year’s promises
DECEMBER 30, 2016 by: Tyler Brûlé

The BBC’s Allan Little had a decent mini-doc on the shifting political sentiment of the past year but beyond that there’s been little in the way of compelling viewing. Most newsrooms felt like they had already switched off the lights and left the interns in charge when Berlin was attacked. There was little context and not nearly enough smart analysis of Germany’s stiflingly bureaucratic security apparatus. For days anchors were asking guests “how could this happen” when a sharp security correspondent could have told everyone from day one that Germany’s matrix of states mixed with federal agencies makes for a messy mélange when it comes to intelligence-sharing, surveillance and enforcement.
resolutions  contextual  security_&_intelligence  Germany  Tyler_Brûlé  surveillance  enforcement 
january 2017 by jerryking
Meet the SEC’s Brainy New Crime Fighters - WSJ
By SCOTT PATTERSON
Updated Dec. 14, 2014

The SEC is mustering its mathematical firepower in its Center for Risk and Quantitative Analytics, which was created last year soon after Mary Jo White took charge of the agency to help it get better at catching Wall Street misconduct. The enforcement unit, led by 14-year SEC veteran Lori Walsh, is housed deep within the warrens of the SEC’s Washington headquarters, and staffed by about 10 employees trained in fields such as mathematical finance, economics, accounting and computer programming.

Ms. Walsh says access to new sources of data and new ways of processing the data have been key to finding evidence of wrongdoing. “When you look at data in different ways, you see new things,” she said in an interview
alternative_data  analysis  analytics  arms_race  data  data_driven  enforcement  fresh_eyes  hiring  information_sources  mathematics  misconduct  models  modelling  patterns  perspectives  quantitative  quants  SEC  stockmarkets  Wall_Street 
december 2014 by jerryking
Insider Trading Persists, and Gets Stealthier - NYTimes.com
By JAMES B. STEWART
Published: December 7, 2012

Why has insider trading proved so persistent, even in the face of prosecutions and popular Hollywood films like “Wall Street”?

The risk-versus-reward equation that has always been a factor in financial markets has changed drastically in the last 20 years....many people who work in financial markets “are highly skilled at cost-benefit analysis,” Mr. Bharara told me. “They’re highly intelligent. They’ve been to the best schools. They weigh the risk of getting caught against the potential reward, and they decide it’s worth the risk. We’re trying to tilt that equation.” There’s no doubt that the potential for gain “has soared,” Robert S. Khuzami, head of enforcement at the S.E.C., told me, and not because there are more takeovers and other market-moving events to trade on. “That’s a big change from the 1980s and ’90s. Hedge funds can take massive positions, use short-selling and derivatives, and employ trading techniques that aren’t transparent, and make huge amounts of money on small fluctuations on price. They don’t need to hit a home run on a $20 pop on a takeover announcement. These bets may be bunts and singles, but they get to the same place.”...The pressure to get an “edge,” as hedge fund traders often put it, has never been greater...In the wake of the Milken-Boesky era, the government has become sophisticated at monitoring major market-moving events like takeover announcements, to the point that insider trading on major corporate news has become relatively rare ...Although some critics say the S.E.C.’s expertise has lagged advances in areas like high-frequency trading, the enforcement division has made progress in monitoring suspicious trading. “We’ve created databases to see who is trading in tandem, even if you know nothing about an event,” Mr. Khuzami said. “It’s a trader-based approach, not an issuer-based approach. These trading patterns are the first clue to what might be insider trading rings. You then have to do the real detective work, pulling phone records and e-mails and using other techniques to uncover the links. ”
highly_skilled  insider_trading  Wall_Street  financiers  hedge_funds  Preet_Bharara  deterrence  Bay_Street  SEC  enforcement  patterns  misconduct  cost-benefit_analysis  slight_edge  trading  stealth  prosecutors  investigative_workups 
december 2012 by jerryking
With a Long List but Short on Money, F.D.A. Tackles Food Safety - NYTimes.com
By WILLIAM NEUMAN
August 22, 2011

A landmark food safety law passed by Congress last December is supposed
to reduce the frequency and severity of food safety problems, but the
roll call of recent cases underlines the magnitude of the task....The
agency is taking on the expanded mission at a time when Washington
budget-slashing means that regulators have little hope of getting
additional money and may instead have their budgets cut by Congress....A
budget freeze or cuts would have the greatest impact on the ambitious
increase in inspections called for under the new law, which ramp up each
year.

“Writing rules is inexpensive (jk: i.e. policymaking is easy); enforcing them is expensive (jk i.e. implementation is hard), said David W. Acheson, a former associate commissioner of the F.D.A. who is now a
food safety consultant. “There will be a public health impact because
enforcement won’t be to the extent they want to do it.”
product_recalls  implementation  food_safety  hard_work  FDA  cost-cutting  policymaking  public_health  enforcement  regulation  pairs  frequency_and_severity  regulators  cutbacks  quotes  rule-writing  budget_cuts 
august 2011 by jerryking
Water Cops Crack Down in Drought Areas - WSJ.com
AUGUST 24, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | by SABRINA SHANKMAN
water  droughts  enforcement  conservation 
august 2009 by jerryking

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