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Byron Allen On Economic Inclusion, Buying The Weather Channel, Comcast Racial Bias Lawsuit + More - YouTube
“I’m going to take my seat at the table”

“Own the game don’t play the game”
Be clear of what you need and your ask.
Making money is easy. It's a mindset. Figuring it out with the internet.

$300 MM is not a lot of money. Understand how much money is out there and is there for YOU.
In the U.S., $20 T in liquidity in our financial sys. Swirling. Looking for places to invest, and to get a safe return. There aren't that many people who can actually invest, protect it and give it back with a return.

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The story of how the struggle for civil rights intertwined and intersected historically with the struggle against monopoly provides a lesson for the future. It suggests a need to recognize how political independence connects with economic independence in the struggle for social justice. Without freedom from domination in one sphere, there is no freedom in the other.
African-Americans  Byron_Allen  civil_rights  economic_clout  economic_inclusion  economic_independence  entrepreneur  equality_of_opportunity  racial_discrimination 
16 days ago by jerryking
The Disruptive World of Edward Norton - The New York Times
Oct. 7, 2019
The disruptive world
of Edward Norton.

By David Marchese Photograph by Mamadi Doumbouya
actors  category_errors  disruption  Edward_Norton  entrepreneur  start_ups 
5 weeks ago by jerryking
Rihanna to lead new LVMH fashion house
May 10, 2019 | Financial Times | by Harriet Agnew in Paris.

Pop star will launch a new line of ready-to-wear luxury clothing, footwear and accessories brand named Fenty, becoming the first woman to create an original brand at LVMH. This is significant because it is one of the most high-profile creative tie-ups to date between a celebrity and a luxury group, and illustrates the lucrative potential of celebrities to draw attention — and sales — through Instagram (Rihanna has 70.5m followers). .....LVMH said Fenty would be “centered on Rihanna, developed by her, and takes shape with her vision . . . including commerciality and communication of the brand”....Rihanna joins other singers such as Beyoncé in launching her own clothing line.....
accessories  apparel  beauty  brands  celebrities  creative_class  digital_influencers  entrepreneur  entrepreneurship  Fenty  footwear  greenfields  Instagram  luxury  LVMH  music  partnerships  singers  clothing  clothing_labels 
may 2019 by jerryking
George Trower-Subira, author, lecturer
December 16, 2010 | The Inquirer | by JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com

FOR A MAN who spent his life in the often frustrating struggle to win justice for African-Americans, George Russell Trower-Subira embodied the meaning of the Swahili word that he added to his given name.

"Subira" means "patience" in Swahili. And that was one of the main characteristics of George's character.

"He had incredible patience with people," said his brother, Len Trower. "Even people who did unjust things to him, he would forgive them. He would try to rationalize why they did it. Me? I'd be throwing things against the wall."

George Russell Trower-Subira, who grew up in Philadelphia as George Trower and wrote numerous books of self-help advice for African-Americans as George Subira, collapsed and died of a heart attack Sunday while jogging on the track at Penn Wood High School, in East Lansdowne. He was 66 and lived in East Lansdowne.

He was a major influence on the subject of black entrepreneurship through his writings and speeches. His book, "Black Folks Guide to Making Big Money in America," published in 1980, was the first to tell blacks that what was missing from their drive for equality was success in the economic arena.....George traveled the country expounding these views, and was in demand at schools and conferences as a speaker and teacher of economic values and business development for blacks.

He gained wide recognition for his ideas and was interviewed on the Phil Donahue show, the "Today" show, "Tony Brown's Journal" and the "700 Club," and was written up in Essence, Ebony, Jet and Black Enterprise, among others.
African-Americans  authors  economic_clout  entrepreneurship  entrepreneur  obituaries  black_power  conspicuous_consumption  distractions  entertainment  immaturity  pay_attention  self-discipline 
april 2019 by jerryking
"Boss: The Black Experience in Business" Explores the History of African American Entrepreneurship Tuesday, April 23 on PBS
Apr 23, 2019 | WNET |

Tying together the past and the present, Boss: The Black Experience in Business explores the inspiring stories of trailblazing African American entrepreneurs and the significant contributions of contemporary business leaders. Stories featured in the film include those of entrepreneur Madam C.J. Walker, publisher John H. Johnson, Motown CEO Berry Gordy, and business pioneer and philanthropist Reginald F. Lewis, among others. The film features new interviews with Vernon Jordan, senior managing director of Lazard, Freres & Co. LLC.; Cathy Hughes, CEO and founder of Urban One; Ursula Burns, former CEO of Xerox and chairman of VEON; Ken Frazier, chairman, president and CEO of Merck & Co., Inc.; Richelieu Dennis, founder, CEO and executive chairman of Sundial Brands; Robert F. Smith, chairman and CEO of Vista Equity Managing Partners, LLC; Earl "Butch" Graves, Jr., CEO of Black Enterprise; and John Rogers, CEO and founder of Ariel Investments.

As a capitalist system emerged in the United States, African Americans found ways to establish profitable businesses in numerous industries, including financial services, retail, beauty, music and media.
African-Americans  Berry_Gordy  C.J.Walker  CEOs  documentaries  entrepreneur  entrepreneurship  filmmakers  founders  historians  history  inspiration  Kenneth_Frazier  Lazard  Merck  moguls  PBS  Reginald_Lewis  Robert_Smith  storytelling  trailblazers  Vernon_Jordan 
april 2019 by jerryking
What tech hasn’t learnt from science fiction
APRIL 3, 2019 | Financial Times | Elaine Moore.

Never mind the future: where are the books tackling Silicon Valley’s current challenges?

There is a myth that Silicon Valley is stuffed full of nerds who have never picked up a book in their lives. Like a lot of tales about the Valley, it is not true. The tech industry is acutely aware of the value of storytelling.......Whenever a tech founder is asked about their favourite novel it is usually worth paying attention. Uber founder Travis Kalanick’s admires Ayn Rand’s The Fountainhead.....Jeff Bezos’s is taken by the quiet despair of Kazuo Ishiguro’s Remains of the Day......and Theranos' Elizabeth Holme is attached to Moby-Dick.

It’s true that reading lists on the West Coast tend to skew towards science fiction.......For Silicon Valley, the genre seems to offer both inspiration and validation. .......But the connection between tech companies and sci-fi novels runs deeper. To make their futuristic projects reality, some seek the help of the authors themselves......Less is made of its focus on the downside of humanity interacting with a virtual world (jk: sci fi doesn't pay enough attention to the the downside of humanity interacting with a virtual world). .....The affection tech founders feel for sci-fi often seems to lack this dimension.....If founders are not paying too much attention to cautionary sci-fi themes, at least some people are. Amazon Go shops can feel like a vision of the future as you pick up milk and walk away, without scanning anything. But cities such as San Francisco have begun to wonder whether cashless shops will end up marginalising the country’s poorest citizens, who do not have access to online bank accounts......does any sci-fi novel offers a way to think about Silicon Valley’s present, as well as its future? The singularity and inter-planetary travel are well covered in literature..... are there book out there that address privacy scandals, electric scooters and $100bn IPOs?
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* Counting Heads' (2005) by David Marusek is a novel set in 2134.
* Mars trilogy by Kim Stanley Robinson.
* Idoru" by William Gibson.
* Count Zero" by William Gibson.
* "Black Mirror" TV series Charlie Brooker.
* The Circle by Dave Eggers.
* ‘Minority Report’ Phil K Dick.
* Cryptonomicon by Neal Stephenson
* Snow Crash by Neal Stephenson.

People who don't read science fiction (SF) are handicapped in today's world really, because usually they form part of the 99% of humans who are unable to look ahead more than a few months or so and see where society is going. ......Or the people that think Elon Musk is a visionary. He is not a visionary! He is just a smart person, which necessarily includes reading SF, and taking things from there. People who do not read SF think that Musk is the only person on the planet thinking about and developing our future society on Mars...  But there are millions - it's just that he is one of a few billionaires working concretely on it. For example, if you read the Mars trilogy by Kim Stanley Robinson, you'd realise that one of the reasons that Elon Musk now has a tunnel boring company is that we will NEED tunnels on Mars... You'd also realise that the TV rights of the trip to Mars will pay for (most of) the cost of the trip... etc. etc. etc.
Amazon_Go  augmented_reality  Ayn_Rand  authors  books  cautionary_tales  Elon_Musk  entrepreneur  fiction  founders  future  futurists  novels  pay_attention  reading_lists  San_Francisco  science_fiction  Silicon_Valley  start_ups  storytelling  virtual_reality  William_Gibson 
april 2019 by jerryking
Tristan Walker on the Roman Empire and Selling a Start-Up to Procter & Gamble - The New York Times
By David Gelles
Dec. 12, 2018

Tristan Walker founded Walker & Company, a maker of health and beauty products for people of color, in 2013. On Wednesday, the company was acquired by Procter & Gamble for an undisclosed sum. The deal represents a successful exit for Mr. Walker and his investors. It also signals an effort by Procter & Gamble, the maker of Gillette, to reach new markets with its shaving products. But while many start-up founders make a hasty exit after getting acquired, Mr. Walker is planning to stay on and grow Bevel, his men’s shaving brand, and Form, his women’s hair care brand. “We’re a team of 15 with very grandiose ambitions,” he said of Walker & Company, which is based in Palo Alto, Calif., but will move to Atlanta as part of the deal. “We want this company and its purpose to still be around 150 years from now.”

What’s that book you’ve got there?

It’s “Parallel Lives” by Plutarch. I’ve really been getting into Greek and Roman mythology. I’m reading something right now about the history of Rome during the 53 years when they really came into power, and this idea of the Roman state growing, the Greek state growing, and the differences therein fascinate me beyond belief. I’ve just been devouring it for the past few weeks now.

Walker attended the Hotchkiss School in Lakeville, Conn. And from there, he got to see how the other half lived. It completely changed his life. He got to see what success could look like. He got to see what wealth was. And it completely changed his worldview.

How so?

I would walk down the halls and see last names like Ford, go to some classes and realize they’re Rockefellers. These are names that were in my imagination. It taught me the importance of name and what that can mean, not only for you but your progeny. When I started at Hotchkiss, I didn’t know what a verb was. So I spent all of my time in the library studying. I spent all of my time thinking about what I wanted to be when I grew up.

What are your priorities as you keep building the company?

I’m dedicating my life to the demographic shift happening in this country. Not only for Silicon Valley. Not only for business. But for this country’s competitiveness. It’s changing. And folks need to respect that and they need to celebrate it.
African-Americans  Bevel  biographies  books  demographic_changes  entrepreneur  entrepreneurship  exits  Form  insights  long-term  P&G  Romans  Silicon_Valley  start_ups  Tristan_Walker  wealth_creation  black-owned  brands  consumer_goods  personal_care_products  personal_grooming  founders 
december 2018 by jerryking
Six Technologies That Could Shake the Food World - WSJ
JOURNAL REPORTS: TECHNOLOGY
Six Technologies That Could Shake the Food World
Printed meals, edible bar codes and facial-recognition technology for cows are among the innovations transforming the food industry

Link copied…
3 COMMENTS
By Annie Gasparro And Jesse Newman
Oct. 2, 2018 10:08 p.m. ET
A machine that prints chicken nuggets. Fake shrimp made out of algae. Edible coverings that keep fruit fresh.

These inventions—and many more—are part of a technological revolution that is poised to shake up the way we eat.

The food industry has been taking heat from consumers and critics who are demanding healthier ingredients, transparency about where their meals come from and better treatment of animals. There is also a growing awareness of the harmful effect that food production can have on the environment.

Now big food companies and entrepreneurs are taking advantage of advances in robotics and data science to meet those challenges—and the trend will likely continue as technology improves, and natural ingre
3-D  technology  food  food_safety  Big_Food  entrepreneur  robotics 
october 2018 by jerryking
Silicon Valley Myths Aside, Time Is on the Side of Aging Entrepreneurs - CIO Journal. - WSJ
By Irving Wladawsky-Berger
Aug 31, 2018

Are young entrepreneurs more likely to produce high-growth firms? Can middle-age founders in their 40s be successful?

Age and High-Growth Entrepreneurship, — a recent working paper by economists Pierre Azoulay, Benjamin Jones, J. Daniel Kim and Javier Miranda — aimed to answer these questions.
aging  ageism  entrepreneur  entrepreneurship  high-growth  Irving_Wladawsky-Berger  midlife  myths  Silicon_Valley  founders 
september 2018 by jerryking
Is Thomas Goode a sleeping giant of British retail?
August 31, 2018 | Financial Times | by Horatia Harrod.

200 year old Thomas Goode & Co is a homewares powerhouse.... Outfitted in morning suits, the staff — many of whom have worked at Thomas Goode for more than two decades — are solicitous and impeccably well-informed. There’s only one thing lacking. Customers....Johnny Sandelson, is the property entrepreneur who acquired the store for an undisclosed amount in July 2018. .....Sandelson has set himself the task of waking the company up — and it’s going to take more than just turning on the lights. What is required is a 21st-century overhaul....Thomas Goode sells more over the phone than it does online, for the simple reason it has no ecommerce platform. Some 40 per cent of its £5m in annual sales comes from special orders — a loyal client outfitting their new yacht or private jet — but oligarchs alone are unlikely to keep the business afloat....The plan, Sandelson says, is to democratise. “Fortnums did it, Smythson did it. Those great British brands reinvented themselves to become relevant to the affluent middle classes, but Thomas Goode didn’t.”.......Sandelson hopes that, in an age of experiential retail, the shop’s peerless service will entice a new generation of customers. He’s also eyeing up collaborations to reach those for whom the Thomas Goode name has little resonance.......Parts of the business that had lain dormant are to be revived, with an injection of £10m-£15m in investment. There’s a voluminous archive to be mined for designs, and production of tableware in the Thomas Goode name is being restarted at factories in Stoke-on-Trent......Sandelson is committed to a revival. “We’re unashamedly proud of our British heritage and our British brand,” he says. “To honour that, you have to be involved with a very high standard of manufacturing in Britain. There would be cheaper ways of going about things, but the British way stands for quality. Stoke-on-Trent has been producing beautiful plates for 200 years. So it works for us.”....Almost inevitably, the top floors of the South Audley Street flagship are to be turned into luxury flats. “Will we be able to afford a shop of this scale in the coming years?” says Sandelson. “I think the brand is bigger than the premises. I’m pursuing the dream on the basis that the building will be developed over time and we’ll hope to have a space within it.”
21st._century  brands  commercial_real_estate  entrepreneur  experiential_marketing  gift_ideas  heritage  history  homewares  London  luxury  middle_class  property_development  real_estate  retailers  restorations  revitalization  turnarounds  United_Kingdom  Victorian 
september 2018 by jerryking
Venture capital firms have a gender problem. Here’s how to fix it - The Globe and Mail
JULY 24, 2018 | THE GLOBE AND MAIL | MICHELLE MCBANE AND LAUREN ROBINSON

Investing in women entrepreneurs isn’t just the right thing to do, it’s also the smart thing to do. Companies with a female founder have been shown to outperform all-male competitors. Despite this, when StandUp Ventures was founded last year to back female-led tech startups, many in the industry were skeptical that there even was a pipeline of women-led firms worthy of funding. Turns out there are plenty – StandUp has already made five investments. If more funds step up to the plate and back female entrepreneurs now, we won’t be having this conversation about female VCs again in a decade.

Change isn’t going to happen overnight. VC firms are very different creatures from the startups they fund: They’re conservative and built for stability, not agility.
gender_gap  venture_capital  vc  women  angels  start_ups  large_companies  under-representation  entrepreneur  founders 
july 2018 by jerryking
Aliko Dangote, Africa’s richest man, on his ‘crazy’ $12bn project
July 10, 2018 | Financial Times | David Pilling 11 HOURS AGO.

On his yacht in Lagos, he talks about his ambitious oil refinery — and his dream of buying Arsenal
Africa  Arsenal  moguls  Nigerians  Nigeria  entrepreneur  Aliko_Dangote  Lagos  oil_industry  oil_refiners  cement  big_bets 
july 2018 by jerryking
Amazon encourages entrepreneurs to build logistics network | Financial Times
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Amazon  Amazon_Prime  last_mile  Fedex  UPS  USPS  entrepreneur  logistics  shippers  speed  small_business  e-commerce  delivery  delivery_networks  delivery_times  delivery_services 
june 2018 by jerryking
An unusual family approach to investing
May 30, 2018 | FT | John Gapper.

JAB’s acquisition of Pret A Manger resembles private equity but with a long-term twist.

Warren Buffett’s definition of Berkshire Hathaway’s ideal investment holding period as forever. ....Luxembourg-based JAB, owned by four heirs to a German chemical fortune, takes a family approach to investing. It is unusual in that this holding company seeks to retain its portfolio companies for at least a decade. These include Panera Bread, Krispy Kreme and Keurig Green Mountain coffee, which it merged with Dr Pepper Snapple in an $18.7bn deal in January 2018. This week JAB acquired the UK sandwich chain Pret A Manger for £1.5bn, continuing its buying spree of cafés and coffee, mounting a challenge to public companies such as Nestlé.

**These companies are acquired not to be traded but to be invested in and expanded.**

JAB is an innovative combination of ownership and investment in a world that needs challengers to stock market ownership and private equity. It is family controlled, but run by veteran professional executives. When it invests in companies such as Pret A Manger, it deploys not only the Reimann family’s wealth but that of other entrepreneurs and family investors.......Some of the equity for its recent deals, including Panera and Dr Pepper, came from funds raised by Byron Trott, the former Goldman Sachs investment banker best known for being trusted by the banker-averse Mr Buffett. Mr Trott’s BDT banking boutique specialises in advising founders and heirs to corporate fortunes, including the Waltons of Walmart, and the Mars and Pritzker families.

This is investment, but not as most of us know it. By definition, the world’s companies are mostly controlled by founders and their families — only a minority become big enough to be floated on stock markets and need to disclose much of their workings to outsiders. Family fortunes also tend to remain as private as possible: there is little incentive to advertise how much wealth one has inherited......As [families'] fortunes grow in size and sophistication, more of the cash is invested in other companies rather than in shares and bonds. That is where JAB and Mr Trott come in.

Entrepreneurs and their families tend to be fascinated by their own enterprises and bored by managing their wealth. But they want to preserve it, and they often like the idea of investing it in companies similar to their own — industrial and consumer groups that need more capital to expand. It is not only more interesting but a form of self-affirmation for the successful....Being acquired by JAB is appealing. The group turns up, says it will not take part in an auction but offers a good price (it bought Pret for more than its former owner Bridgepoint could get by floating it). It often keeps the existing executives, telling them they have to plough their own money into the company, and invests in long-term growth provided the business is efficiently run.

This is more congenial than heading a public company and contending with a huge variety of shareholders, including short-term and activist investors. It is also less risky than being bought by 3G Capital, the cost-cutting private equity group with which Mr Buffett teamed up to acquire Kraft Heinz. While 3G is expert at eliminating expenses it is less so at encouraging growth.
coffee  dynasties  high_net_worth  holding_periods  investing  investors  JAB  long-term  Nestlé  Pritzker  private_equity  privately_held_companies  Unilever  unusual  Warren_Buffett  family  cafés  Pret_A_Manger  3G_Capital  discretion  entrepreneur  boring  family_business  heirs 
may 2018 by jerryking
Steven Brill's "Tailspin": How My Generation Broke America
May 17, 2018 | | Time | By STEVEN BRILL.

From matters small – there are an average of 657 water-main breaks a day, for example – to large, it is clear that the country has gone into a tailspin over the last half-century, when John F. Kennedy’s New Frontier was about seizing the future, not trying to survive the present..............The Meritocracy’s ascent was about more than personal profit. As my generation of achievers graduated from elite universities and moved into the professional world, their personal successes often had serious societal consequences. They upended corporate America and Wall Street with inventions in law and finance that created an economy built on deals that moved assets around instead of building new ones. They created exotic, and risky, financial instruments, including derivatives and credit default swaps, that produced sugar highs of immediate profits but separated those taking the risk from those who would bear the consequences. They organized hedge funds that turned owning stock into a minute-by-minute bet rather than a long-term investment. They invented proxy fights, leveraged buyouts and stock buybacks that gave lawyers and bankers a bonanza of new fees and maximized short-term profits for increasingly unsentimental shareholders, but deadened incentives for the long-term growth of the rest of the economy.....[We need 'guardrails' against legal and financial excesses.]......Forty-eight years after Inky Clark gave me my ticket on the meritocracy express in 1967, a professor at Yale Law School jarred the school’s graduation celebration. Daniel Markovits, who specializes in the intersection of law and behavioral economics, told the class of 2015 that their success getting accepted into, and getting a degree from, the country’s most selective law school actually marked their entry into a newly entrenched aristocracy that had been snuffing out the American Dream for almost everyone else. Elites, he explained, can spend what they need to in order to send their children to the best schools, provide tutors for standardized testing and otherwise ensure that their kids can outcompete their peers to secure the same spots at the top that their parents achieved.

“American meritocracy has thus become precisely what it was invented to combat,” Markovits concluded, “a mechanism for the dynastic transmission of wealth and privilege across generations. Meritocracy now constitutes a modern-day aristocracy.”.....
Daniel_Markovits  baby_boomers  entrepreneur  income_inequality  politics  revenge_effects  Steven_Brill  political_polarization  fractured_internally  books  meritocratic  America_in_Decline?  elitism  lawyers  self-perpetuation  upper-income  inequality  privilege  the_best_and_brightest  tailspins  guardrails  the_American_dream  cultural_transmission  wealth_transfers  partisan_politics 
may 2018 by jerryking
Ticketmaster’s New Challenger: Your Face - WSJ
By Anne Steele
Updated May 4, 2018

The industry is ripe for disruption. People are spending more than ever on experiences, even as concern is rising about security at crowded live events. At the same time, artists and teams today have little control over how, to whom or for how much their tickets are sold.
entrepreneur  start_ups  disruption  Live_Nation  live_performances  facial-recognition  sports  arenas  Ticketmaster  Rival  Andreessen_Horowitz 
may 2018 by jerryking
Les Wexner, the man behind Victoria’s Secret
Barney Jopson MARCH 30, 2018

Propped against the wall are boards from recent presentations about customer loyalty schemes and the nearby Easton open-air shopping complex, which was conceived by Wexner, a staunch and often lonely defender of bricks-and-mortar retail....Since his existential crisis, Wexner has devoted part of his time and fortune to philanthropy, funding leadership training and the Wexner Center for the Arts and Wexner Medical Center at Ohio State University, his alma mater.....The typical lifespan of a fashion business, Wexner says, is 15 years. Most retail chains, whatever they sell, don’t survive beyond 20 or 30 years. Yet Wexner has been in charge for 55 years. Behind him in the Fortune 500 longevity stakes is Warren Buffett, the billionaire investor who has run Berkshire Hathaway for a mere 53. The key to survival, Wexner says, is to reinvent yourself as your shoppers evolve. “When the customer zigs, you zig.”

But he is facing his stiffest trial yet. Amazon, which has conquered a series of retail categories, is now getting into underwear. Online-only lingerie specialists are trying to steal Victoria’s Secret customers....His eventual point is that most people want to express their individuality, which has a lot to do with sexuality, which means lingerie is loaded with powerful “emotional content” for women.......I talk about the predictive power of data and algorithms (one of Amazon’s great assets) but he pooh-poohs their relevance. The response is similarly dismissive when I ask Wexner — who did not marry his lawyer wife Abigail until he was 55 — whether he sourced lingerie ideas from the women he dated. “N-n-nooo,” he says. “You can’t ask. Fashion is about latent demand. You can’t research it. If I say, ‘what colour are you going to buy next fall?’, no one is going to say, ‘I think purple’s going to be a great colour’.”
........He says the death of shops has been greatly exaggerated. Sure, 9,000 US stores closed last year by some estimates. Sure, habits are changing. People used to wile away four hours at the mall and visit 20 stores. Now they skip the mediocre shops and make a beeline for just one or two, Wexner says. But humans are still “pack animals” who like to mingle. And where they go, they spend more. Amazon is great for buying commodity products when you know exactly what you want. But fashion stores are about stumbling upon “things you haven’t seen before”, Wexner says. The doom-mongers are looking at average sales across all shops. “I think they’re missing the wheat from the chaff,” he says.
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Leslie_Wexner  Victoria's_Secret  moguls  CEOs  entrepreneur  retailers  L_Brands  intimate_apparel  personal_care_products  lingerie  bricks-and-mortar 
april 2018 by jerryking
Banking and finance have vacuumed up the talent
March 25, 2018 | Financial Times | Andrew Hill YESTERDAY.
"Unlike most people I actually enjoy manufacturing,” James Dyson says, “[but] I genuinely believe that the British middle class despises it, largely thanks to Charles Dickens’ Hard Times and William Blake’s ‘dark satanic mills’.”

The UK designer of vacuum cleaners and hand-dryers enjoys railing against national “cultural disdain for factories”......A more plausible reason why innovative juices are channelled away from manufacturing could be the sucking sound from the City of London. The rewards of banking and finance still vacuum up talented graduates......Even when the bubble was at full stretch in 2007, the percentage of engineering graduates who moved into finance and insurance within three years of leaving higher education did not top 5 per cent. Lately, the figure has dropped to 3.4 per cent. A Dyson-pleasing 25.5 per cent now go into manufacturing — not enough to cover a projected annual shortfall of 20,000 engineers in the UK, but still respectable.

It was the sheer success and smug complacency of Victorian manufacturers that made them a target for Dickens. As Sir James goes from strength to strength, he should be careful what he wishes for. He has set up a Dyson Institute to train a generation of engineers.
financial_services  engineering  talent  entrepreneur  war_for_talent  finance  manufacturers  James_Dyson 
march 2018 by jerryking
Why do entrepreneurs get such a bad rap?
26 Aug. 2017, p. 2. I Financial Times pg. 15 | by Janan Ganesh. "

Richard Branson's battle to establish Virgin Atlantic against British Airways in the 1980s was a better story than anything politic...
entrepreneur  creative_types  Janan_Ganesh  Richard_Branson 
november 2017 by jerryking
David Tang, Fashion Retailer and Raconteur, Dies at 63
AUG. 30, 2017 | The New York Times | By KEITH BRADSHER and ELIZABETH PATON.

HK businessman, socialite and the FT's Agony Uncle.
obituaries  retailers  entrepreneur  Hong_Kong  etiquette  David_Tang 
august 2017 by jerryking
Shanghai surprise
19 August/ 20 August 2017 | Financial Times | Helen Roxburgh.

It was this frustration that pushed Sy, who graduated with a masters in international business in France, to start making her own skincare products in 2015. Like many entrepreneurs in China, she chose to forego prolonged levels of planning and instead bounced straight on to social media platform WeChat to launch the business.

In Europe, you’d prepare everything first. In Shanghai you just try it and see what happens

WeChat has more than 900m monthly users, and is used not only for messaging but everything from paying bills, buying coffee, giving to charity and taxis. According to a report in 2016, 200m users have linked payment cards with their accounts, and a third spend more than Rmb500 a month via the platform. WeChat has been pushing its in-app payments and mobile-optimised digital stores to draw in businesses.

“It’s fantastic for entrepreneurs,” says Sy. “I had this idea, posted on WeChat, that I was going to be selling my own scrubs and body creams for Christmas, and was surprised at how quickly I started to get orders. Then of course I panicked because I didn’t actually have anything yet — but within a week a friend made me some simple packaging and I was off. I ended up selling out.” After six months, she started to run Lalu full time, selling mostly through online platforms. As well as expanding Lalu, Sy also launched a clothing brand, Nubien, inspired by bright African fabrics and clothing.
women  Africa  entrepreneur  China  Shanghai  personal_care_products  product_launches  beauty  WeChat  Lalu  start_ups  MBAs 
august 2017 by jerryking
Reza Satchu: What I learned after selling my first startup for nearly $1 billion
JUN. 30, 2017 | The Globe and Mail | INTERVIEW BY DAWN CALLEJA

The major disadvantage I had coming out of McGill was that I had more modest expectations. Whereas kids at Harvard, Yale, Stanford—through their interactions with CEOs, they get to see what’s possible. The reason I created Economics for Entrepreneurs at the University of Toronto, and then Next 36, was to provide that bridge.
The class is purposely stressful, because guess what? Being an entrepreneur is stressful.

There’s an increasing prosperity gap between Canada and the U.S. Not because we don’t work as hard, but because we don’t have any Facebooks, any Googles, any Ubers here.
If someone asked me if I wanted to teach entrepreneurship in high school or to 30-year-olds, I’d go for high school. Google, Microsoft, Facebook, Uber—they were all started by people in their 20s.

In Silicon Valley, failure is almost a badge. In Canada, getting young adults thinking about failing and taking risk early in their careers is a good thing.....Never underestimate the stupidity of large companies. If they did everything right, there’d never be new companies.
Part of being an entrepreneur is suspending disbelief and just going with your gut. So take the imperfect information you have and make a judgment. If it’s wrong, who cares? Just keep going.
chutzpah  audacity  entrepreneur  Alignvest  large_companies  brands  Fortune_500  McGill  thinking_big 
july 2017 by jerryking
Jeff Stober: ‘You’re gonna get back what you put into the universe’
Jul. 09, 2017 | The Globe and Mail | SARAH EFRON.
The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, 6:00AM EDT
Last updated Friday, Jul. 07, 2017 4:51PM EDT
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Jeff Stober is the founder and owner of the Drake Hotel in Toronto. The Drake and its offshoots – the Drake One Fifty restaurant, five Drake General Stores, Drake Devonshire Inn and the new food-focused Drake Commissary – employ more than 500 people.
personal_branding  entrepreneur  restauranteurs  serial_entrepreneur  Toronto  hoteliers  founders 
july 2017 by jerryking
Enterprising Bostonians - WSJ
By John Steele Gordon
June 25, 2017

BRAHMIN CAPITALISM

By Noam Maggor
Harvard, 284 pages, $39.95
Boston  history  slavery  entrepreneur  entrepreneurship  books  Boston_Brahmins 
june 2017 by jerryking
LeBron James’s Media Empire Is Doing Way Better Than His Team - WSJ
By Ben Cohen
Updated June 7, 2017

Uninterrupted, is a media startup founded by Cleveland star LeBron James and his business partner Maverick Carter, and backed by more than $15 million from Time Warner Inc.’s Warner Bros. studio and Turner Sports unit......it's a way of connecting professional athletes with professional writers, producers and directors who could help them say what they wanted to say.......It’s the latest evolution of a movement in which athletes, celebrities and other public figures are using social media and other technology to control their images and communicate directly with the public. In the process, they are loosening traditional media’s grip on the way sports is delivered and consumed. James, Carter and their partners are betting some of the most compelling sports content in the shifting entertainment landscape will be created by the athletes themselves.....Uninterrupted’s multimedia offerings include full-length documentaries, web series and a growing podcast network. Some of its shows have been licensed by traditional media outlets such as Fox Sports, which broadcast an Uninterrupted documentary about a mixed martial-arts fighter. Shows also appear on YouTube, Instagram and Uninterrupted’s own website.
sports  athletes_&_athletics  digital_media  personal_branding  podcasts  gatekeepers  multiplatforms  YouTube  Instagram  content  entertainment  LeBron_James  entrepreneur  documentaries  Fox_Sports  user_generated  mass_media 
june 2017 by jerryking
Naive entrepreneurs at risk of losing out to venture capitalists
Jan. 20, 2016 | The Financial Times News: p6. | Murad Ahmed

Tech start-up financing is often structured to protect venture capitalists, not founders, says Murad Ahmed

Nicolas Brusson and Philip...
entrepreneur  founders  vc  venture_capital  France  BlaBlaCar  trustworthiness  relationships  funding  asymmetrical  investors  naivete  connected_cars 
april 2017 by jerryking
Bumble founder Whitney Wolfe on millennial matchmaking | Evernote Web
18 March / 19 March 2017 | FT| by Alice Fishburn.

. . . Half a year in tech-app time, it’s like a normal-world five years.” What’s the solution? “You just have to run faster than it does.’’
Wolfe has surfed an extraordinary sea-change in how we approach relationships. Our phones now allow us to identify potential life companions through location, ethnic origin or hatred of the same thing and reject them just as quickly. Such opportunities come with a healthy serving of ethical and personal dilemmas.....Bumble’s USP — “truly not a gimmick”, Wolfe stresses, and timely for a feminist age — is that the woman has all the power (while both sexes swipe to show interest, only she can start a conversation). Wolfe may be firmly on-brand but she laughs wickedly at the ambitions of many tech evangelists. “So many entrepreneurs approach me and say, ‘I want to start the next big thing’, and I say, ‘Well, what are you solving?’ And oftentimes they say, ‘Oh, I’m not sure. I want to start something big.’ ” Sigh. “You can never start something big without solving something small, right? And for me, that was not being allowed to text guys first.”.....What has all this time with the data taught her about humans? “You understand when people are the happiest, the most busy, the most detached, most involved.” Sunday nights and Mondays are the busiest times on the site: “I think that’s probably really telling because that’s usually people’s downtime, when they are relaxing or when they’re feeling bummed out . . . a little bit lonely.”
Our view on the idea of technology running our love lives unsurprisingly depends on our culture. One transatlantic dater tells me that, in the US, Bumble is strongly associated with empowered women. In the UK, some moan that it just caters to lazy men.
women  entrepreneur  Tinder  Austin  dating  mobile_applications  relationships  feminism  millennials  match-making  sexism  Silicon_Valley  accelerated_lifecycles  algorithms  gestures  online_dating  downtime 
march 2017 by jerryking
Oxford Diary
4 March / 5 March | Financial Times | Madhumita Murgia.

The goals is to build a conversation around change, to make technological change less scary, to make sure people don't feel left behind because of technology---do this within 26 hrs.....In the Cotswolds, too, senior British media executive tells me his own experience of working with YouTubers "was more like a one-night stand than a marriage". "We use each other for numbers and legitimacy, but the question is will they ever understand the subtler issues of traditional programming? Rules? Political correctness?.....A government adviser tells me that they are afraid that AI will change the relationship between state and citizen....Algorithms helping governments make important social decisions. Algorithms are a kind of black box and that government many not be able to explain its choices when questioned.
Google  future  conferences  change  handpicked  entrepreneur  ISIS  civil_servants  algorithms  YouTube  mass_media  digital_media  artificial_intelligence  biases  value_judgements  large_companies  print_journalism  technological_change  cultural_clash 
march 2017 by jerryking
Monocle editor-in-chief Tyler Brûlé is a rare believer in print - The Globe and Mail
ERIC REGULY - EUROPEAN BUREAU CHIEF
LONDON — The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Dec. 23, 2016

Wallpaper was Mr. Brule’s first media success story, even if it was, for him, a financial dud. ...Wallpaper, focused on fashion, design, travel and art and, as does Monocle today, highlighted top-quality products and services as opposed to merely “luxury” offerings in all their potential vulgarity. The magazine was launched in 1996 – “It ran out of money right away” – and Mr. Brûlé sold it to Time Warner (now Time Inc.) a year later. In 1998, Wallpaper started Winkreative, a brand design and strategy agency that, lately, designed the brand image of Toronto’s Union Pearson Express.....Across the street are two trim shops – Trunk Labs and Trunk Clothiers – that sell horrendously expensive travel and clothing items such as the Begg Arran scarf, apparently made from the wool of caviar-fed sheep; yours for €345 (almost $500 Canadian).

On the same street is the little, ship-shape Monocle Café...The Monocle Shop is around the corner. In nearby Paddington, Monocle is experimenting with Kioskafé, a news and coffee shop that sells 300 magazine titles and thousands of print-on-demand titles, including The Globe and Mail.

Mr. Brûlé says the collective revenue for the publishing, agency and retail spreads are about $50-million. “We’re disappointingly small,” he says.
Eric_Reguly  Tyler_Brûlé  Monocle  digital_media  cosmopolitan  stylish  print_journalism  magazines  journalism  entrepreneur  branding  niches  elitism  social_media 
december 2016 by jerryking
Max Levchin of Affirm: Seeking the Endurance Athletes of Business - The New York Times
By ADAM BRYANT DEC. 9, 2016

one thing I have found over the years is that in hiring, the dominant characteristic I select for is this sense of perseverance in really tough situations. It’s like the difference between endurance athletes and sprinters. I think it is a really good predictor for how people behave under severe stress.

Working in a start-up means there is a baseline of stress with occasional spikes. There are people who are really good at handling spikes. In fact, most people are really good at handling spikes. But normal isn’t normal. There is constant stress. And so I look for endurance athletes, in the business sense.

And how do you test for that?

I ask about the longest stressful episode in your professional career. A lot of people talk about some all-nighter. Then I’ll say, “No, that may have been the highest stress moment, but what’s the longest period of stress you faced?”
Max_Levchin  endurance  Affirm  fin-tech  start_ups  entrepreneur  stressful  perseverance 
december 2016 by jerryking
Engineer Extraordinaire, Charles Ceres, is a ‘Special Person’
Oct 30, 2016 | Kaieteur News | By Sharmain Grainger.

“I want people to remember Charles Ceres the person, not what profession I was in. Whatever I have acquired hasn’t changed me. The difference between me and a lot of people is that I know the difference between who I am and what I do…what I do is not who I am.”
Queen’s  alumni  engineering  humility  Afro-Guyanese  management_consulting  entrepreneur  entrepreneurship 
october 2016 by jerryking
Sam Altman’s Manifest Destiny - The New Yorker
OCTOBER 10, 2016 |New Yorker | Tad Friend.

Quotation from Admiral Hyman Rickover. “The great end of life is not knowledge, but action,” ...“I believe it is the duty of each of us to act as if the fate of the world depended on him. . . . We must live for the future, not for our own comfort or success.”
Sam_Altman  doers  Y_Combinator  Silicon_Valley  start_ups  investors  entrepreneur  quotes  Paul_Graham  Peter_Thiel  action-oriented  forward_looking  future 
october 2016 by jerryking
How young entrepreneur saw a need and turned it into a $10-million firm - The Globe and Mail
SHELLEY WHITE
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, May 10, 2016

asked QuickContractors to be a secondary resource for installation, delivery and assembly to customers in some of the more challenging geographic areas of Canada. Mr. Bouchard says the opportunity convinced him that his company needed to be the “master contractor” in the equation, controlling the entire life cycle of a job. A new business model was born. “The idea was that we would get the revenue from the Bay and then pay the contractor on the other end to execute the work,” he says. “That’s how we evolved from being an online directory to being a national installation company for major retailers.”
e-commerce  retailers  Home_Depot  Lowe's  nationwide  business_models  Canadian_Tire  delivery  installation  assembly  start_ups  entrepreneur  home_renovations  home_appliances  home-center_industry  home-improvement  QuickContractors  HBC  contractors 
june 2016 by jerryking
General Mills Adds Kite Hill to Food Start-Up Investments - The New York Times
By STEPHANIE STROMMAY 19, 2016

General Mills, one of America’s corporate food titans, is quietly establishing itself in venture capital, investing in some of the hottest new food companies.

It is just one of a small but growing number of giant food companies that have decided they can no longer afford to sit on the sidelines as smaller, more nimble start-ups outmaneuver them in the race for consumers seeking minimally processed, locally sourced, environmentally sustainable foods free of preservatives and chemicals.....Many small food businesses are wary of taking money from, or getting bought out by, food giants, mindful of the many stories of small, successful companies that are bought only to all but disappear into a multibillion-dollar corporation.

That reluctance has spawned a boom in small venture capital and private equity firms offering to finance small food businesses. And food entrepreneurs who have cashed out, like Jon Sebastiani, the founder of Krave Jerky, are forming businesses that offer advice and financing to small food companies.
food  General_Mills  venture_capital  start_ups  Mondelez  niches  entrepreneur  corporate_investors  Big_Food 
may 2016 by jerryking
5 Spectacular Marketing Insights From Cirque du Soleil On Customer Intimacy | momentology
By Lisa Lacy, 21st of April 2016 at 14:05 PM.

So how does Cirque du Soleil use get closer to its fans? Here are five marketing insights from Derricks.

1. Be Ready To Ask & Re-Ask Questions

the live entertainment brand isn’t the new kid on the block anymore....undergoing a huge transformation as a result in part of private investment firm TPG acquiring a majority stake last year.

“And what’s fascinating is this inflection point is a chance to re-ask all the questions,” Derricks said. “Everything is back on the table again. Our brand is incredibly strong on stage, but where we’re challenged is what happens beyond the lights and how to interact with you.”

2. Don’t Miss The Marketing Basics
it’s hard for a brand like Cirque du Soleil to simply deliver an app or the like, so “given the crowded market, there’s a lot of basic blocking and tackling as much as finding the next brand new thing. Sometimes it’s about being in the right place at the right time.”

That means Cirque du Soleil capitalizes on traditional out-of-home tactics like taxi toppers and marquis ads, as well as videos in taxis to create awareness and buzz.

3. Have Smaller Conversations & Tell Stories

Derricks said the brand is hearing from its fans that they want to know more about the performers and what goes on behind the scenes.

“Where we’re challenged is selling the concept of the show itself,” Derricks said. “The most radical thing we can do is to be more intimate. I don’t know if we can be louder, but we can be more intimate and [and bring you] behind the curtain, which is a fascinating new adventure for Cirque du Soleil.

4. Bring People To You

Another part of Cirque du Soleil’s marketing strategy involves breaking down the shows into their component parts and connecting with audiences from there....As a result, the brand has begun experimenting with master classes in fields like makeup and dance.

5. Conduct Team Building Activities

What’s more, noting the circus itself has changed drastically as traditional circuses included acts in which performers were related by blood and were therefore very tightly knit, Derricks said Cirque du Soleil, which includes groups of performers without family ties, had to conjure up its own unique methods of fostering trust....As a result, Cirque du Soleil created Spark Sessions, or corporate experiences for networking, business development and/or milestones, to get other companies involved and to help teach what it has since learned about trust and leadership, "
private_equity  TPG  Guy_Laliberté  entrepreneur  fascination  Cirque_du_Soleil  customer_experience  storytelling  customer_intimacy  LBMA  out-of-home  teams  trustworthiness  brands  insights  outreach  live_performances  corporate_training  inflection_points 
april 2016 by jerryking
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