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jerryking : entropy   3

Fighting the tendency to drift apart
APRIL 7, 2000 | The Globe and Mail| SEAN FINE.

An Intentional Family is one whose members create a working plan to stay connected. The plan is centred on rituals such as family meals, holiday celebrations and special occasions such as weddings, birthdays and bar mitzvahs.

"At heart, the Intentional Family is a ritualizing family," writes Dr. Doherty, director of the marriage and family therapy program at the University of Minnesota. "In the face of the obstacles and distractions of modern life, Intentional Families find a way to use meals to feed their souls along with their bodies.".....People assume that "if you love each other, the family will take care of itself" -- but that is not the case. "Some people lose a focus on what do we need to do as a family to maintain our ties with each other.

"I think it's a real problem. Increasingly, with our very busy families, dinner is likely to be the only opportunity for everyone to be together having a conversation."

The importance of family rituals has grown as religion and community have faded
disconnecting  children  parenting  rituals  intentionality  entropy  dining  family  Communicating_&_Connecting 
november 2017 by jerryking
Are we witnessing a comeback of the Stars and Stripes? - The Globe and Mail
JOHN STACKHOUSE
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Sep. 26 2014

America’s retreat was the central question. Had the superpower become a super-bystander? Or had the President just lost interest, energy and credibility to do more than moralize?...Mr. Obama has drawn instead on what he calls “progressive pragmatism,” which his aides claim is his nature, relying on an informal network of networks, ad hoc groups of nations taking on the challenges of the day. Some of them champion liberal values. Some are partners of convenience. Exhibit A: the coalition of willing Arab states in this week’s air strikes. Exhibit B: the network of health agencies and charities operating with U.S. support in ebola-stricken West Africa....On the grander issues of his age – climate change, cyber-security, the financial imbalance between America and Asia – Mr. Obama will need ad hoc networks like never before. The 2008 financial crisis was mitigated by a small group of central bankers, commercial bankers, regulators and finance ministers, supported but not directed by the United States. A president who is not renowned for building private-sector trust, or the loyalty of other nations, may be challenged to do that again. He also needs what America has lacked of late – for its allies to do more. Canada’s approach to carbon emissions is the sort of passive resistance the U.S. has encountered from India on trade, Mexico on immigration and Turkey on Syria. Under Mr. Obama, everyone has loved to complain about Washington, but few have been willing to shoulder their share of the costs.

Skeptics believe this is no longer possible – the world has too many strong voices, too many competing interests, too much of what physicists call entropy, the thermodynamic condition that degenerates order into chaos.
America_in_Decline?  bouncing_back  U.S.foreign_policy  multipolarity  Obama  John_Stackhouse  G20  UN  NATO  Iran  Ukraine  geopolitics  complexity  networks  interconnections  instability  superpowers  indispensable  disequilibriums  ad_hoc  nobystanders  entropy  imbalances 
september 2014 by jerryking
When the Pieces Put Themselves Together - NYTimes.com
July 11, 2012 | NYT |By JENNIFER 8. LEE

Instead of assembly lines, what if manufacturing moved to self-assembly lines?

There is something counterintuitive about seeing toys and furniture that spring together simply when their pieces are shaken around and around.

Doesn’t this go against the principles of entropy we learned in high school science, where order is supposed to dissolve into disorder?

Actually, no. Self-assembly is a well-studied phenomenon on the molecular level — snowflakes, proteins, viruses — and one of the driving forces in nanotechnology. But researchers are taking principles from microbiology and applying them on the macro level — furniture, infrastructure and even buildings for space...Certain principles govern self-assembly. First, there needs to be a blueprint of the ultimate form. Second, the system needs to have forces of attraction that bring together the parts. These can either be magnets or electrostatic forces. Third, error correction has to allow the pieces to “fix” themselves when they assemble in the wrong way. Fourth, an external energy source is needed to activate the assembly. On the molecular level, this is often heat, but on the human scale it can be simple shaking. (It is actually this external energy source that allows self-assembly to seemingly violate the principle of entropy, since entropy is a law that applies only to isolated systems)...Self-assembly is most useful where human hands have difficulty bolting things together — outer space, extreme cold, free fall and deep oceans, he says.
self-assembly  manufacturers  toys  entropy  nanotechnology  error_correction  disorder  human_scale  blueprints 
july 2012 by jerryking

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