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jerryking : esoteric   4

5 Ways to Value Your Collection, Whether It’s Fine Wine or Shrunken Heads
March 1, 2019 | The New York Times | By Paul Sullivan.

Collectible assets include wine, spirits, coins, trading cards as well as more unusual items, like lighters, belt buckles and even shrunken heads. These collections cost money and time to assemble and certainly have a value to their owners, but can they be considered legitimate investments? That depends on the market.

For many collectors, the only option to buy, sell or even value these assets is through online auction platforms like eBay or enthusiast sites, but for others, their possessions are treated as fine art.......the market for collectibles, which are often valued in the millions of dollars, may not always be so easy to weather. It can experience sudden surges that put desired items out of the reach of true collectors or it can collapse, wiping out the gains speculators thought they had made.

In an economic slowdown, how these investments are treated depends on supply and demand as well as unpredictable forces like fashion and popularity.....Collectibles can be broken into categories determined by provenance, rarity and even a moment in time. Here are five issues to consider when weighing the investment potential of your collection.....
(1) The standouts in the crowd - Leading the pack are high-quality items that have broad name recognition.
(2) High risk, high reward -
(3) Not all collectibles are investments- jewelry is not an investment....because the market is driven too much by changing fashion.
(4) Obscure and difficult to sell - establish the value of esoteric collections by using third-party appraisers. But insurance companies like A.I.G. value these collections by their replacement value, not by the price someone would pay for them.
(5) A market downturn - =hether it’s shrunken heads, 1,000 bottles of wine or sheets of trading cards, a ready buyer may not be available — or may want to pay much less (i.e. a step change in the valuation).
collectibles  collectors  high-risk  howto  obscure  valuations  AIG  auctions  assets  brands  eBay  economic_downturn  esoteric  fine_arts  high-end  high-quality  investing  investments  passions  step_change  unpredictability  wine  whisky  online_auctions 
march 2019 by jerryking
The Inner Bezos | WIRED
"At a certain point I was sort of a professional dater," he explains about his years in New York. His systematic approach to the quest for a permanent relationship was to develop what he labeled "women flow," a play on the "deal flow" Wall Streeters try to generate to locate worthwhile investments. In managing their deal flow, bankers will set limits like "I won't look at anything under a $10 million equity investment." The limitation Bezos set for friends producing candidates for his "women flow" was more esoteric. "The number-one criterion was that I wanted a woman who could get me out of a Third World prison," he says.

"What I really wanted was someone resourceful. But nobody knows what you mean when you say, 'I'm looking for a resourceful woman.' If I tell somebody I'm looking for a woman who can get me out of a Third World prison, they start thinking Ross Perot - Ah-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha! - they have something they can hang their hat on! Life's too short to hang out with people who aren't resourceful." [ Reminiscent of "Lawyers, Guns and Money" is a song by Warren Zevon, the closing track on his 1978 album Excitable Boy.]
dating  esoteric  Jeff_Bezos  origin_story  profile  resourcefulness  systematic_approaches  women 
february 2019 by jerryking
Working With Big Data: The New Math - WSJ.com
March 8, 2013| WSJ | By DEBORAH GAGE.

Researchers turn to esoteric mathematics to help make sense of it all.

New views [of old data are arriving] came courtesy of software that uses topology, a branch of math that compresses relationships in complex data into shapes researchers can manipulate and probe....

Better Tools
Seeking better tools than traditional statistical methods to analyze the vast amounts of data newly available to companies and organizations, researchers increasingly are scouring scientific papers and esoteric branches of mathematics like topology to make sense of complex data sets. The developer of the software used by Dr. Lum, Ayasdi, is just one of a small but growing number of companies working in this field.

So much data is now available, in such vast scope and minute detail, it is no longer useful to look at numbers neatly laid out in two-dimensional columns and rows,.....The research that inspired Ayasdi was funded by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, or Darpa, and the National Science Foundation.......Data is so complex that using the same old methods, asking the same old questions, doesn't make sense....What is useful, he says, is to look at data arranged in shapes, using topology.

Topology is a form of geometry that relies on the way humans perceive shapes. We can see that an A is an A even when the letters are squashed or written in different fonts. Topology helps researchers look at a set of data and think about its similarities, even when some of the underlying details may be different....But topology is just one of the new methods being explored. Chris Kemp, former chief technology officer for IT at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and now the chief executive of cloud computing company Nebula Inc., says he expects to see a renaissance in advanced mathematics and algorithms as companies increasingly realize how valuable data is and how cheaply they can store it.......Using graph theory, a tool similar to topology, IBM is mapping interactions of people on social networks, including its own. In diagrams based on the communications traffic, each person is a node, and communications between people are links. Graph-theory algorithms help discover the shortest path between the nodes, and thus reveal social cliques—or subcommunities—which show up because the cliques are more tightly interconnected than the community around them.......Tellagence's algorithms, for example, predicts how information will travel as it moves through social networks, but assumes that the network will change constantly, like the weather, and that what's most important about the data is the context in which it appears.

These techniques helped Tellagence do a bit of detective work for a Silicon Valley company that wanted to track down the source of some influential ideas being discussed online about the kind of integrated circuits it makes, known as field programmable gate arrays. Tellagence identified a group of more than 100 Japanese engineers involved in online discussions about the circuits. It then pinpointed two or three people whom traffic patterns showed were at the center of the conversation.

Tellagence's customer then devised a strategy to approach the engineers and potentially benefit from their ideas.

Says Tellagence CEO Matt Hixson, "We love to talk about people who have followers or friends, but these engineers were none of that—they had the right set of relationships because the right people listened to them."
algorithms  Ayasdi  DARPA  esoteric  IBM  infographics  massive_data_sets  mapping  mathematics  Nebula  networks  patterns  sense-making  Tellagence  the_right_people  tools  topology  visualization 
march 2013 by jerryking
The man who wants to fix retail
May 15, 2008 | Fortune | By Suzanne Kapner, writer. Richard
Baker, the scion of a Greenwich, Conn., real estate dynasty, has made a
billion-dollar bet on Lord & Taylor and an esoteric list of
designers. Is he fashion's next power player, or will he be the latest
deep-pocketed outsider to lose his shirt?
esoteric  HBC  moguls  real_estate  retailers  Richard_Baker 
december 2010 by jerryking

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