recentpopularlog in

jerryking : estate_planning   18

What It Was Like to Finally Write My Will
April 3, 2018 | The New York Times | John Schwartz

Will to-do list
Get a will. Really. Dying without one — “intestate” — is a drag for everyone.

Get a lawyer. Unless your life is wonderfully uncomplicated, you’ll want the help of an adviser. Even if you do it yourself, have an attorney look over your work.

ADVERTISEMENT

Continue reading the main story
Decide on your beneficiaries, and make sure your insurance policies and other investments are in agreement with what your will says.

Name an executor. It’s a tough and thankless job, so get someone with good judgment; this person can be paid out of your estate.

Got young kids? Name a guardian. If not, the courts will appoint one; why not take care of this essential matter ahead of time?

Secure your paperwork. Once the documents are done, put them in a safe place and make sure your relatives know how to find it.

Revisit it every five years. The world changes; your will should, too.
estate_planning  personal_finance  lists  wills  heirs 
april 2018 by jerryking
How to Prepare, Just in Case You Die Young - WSJ
By Chana R. Schoenberger
March 4, 2018

POWERS OF ATTORNEY and PROXIES
“If you’re worried about passing suddenly or becoming suddenly incapacitated, the legal documents you should have are some sort of health-care advance directive and a living will,” Mr. Kaplan says. A health-care proxy appoints one person, older than age 18, to act on your behalf when making medical decisions. If you don’t have this document signed and something happens to you, your spouse will have the right to make these decisions for you, followed by your adult children and your parents. Make sure to designate a first- and second-choice person to be your proxy, Mr. Kaplan says.

You’ll also want to sign a living will, which lays out your intentions for end-of-life care, such as when to withhold treatment if doctors determine you’re not going to recover, and whether you wish to be an organ donor.
checklists  insurance  estate_planning  howto  dying  end-of-life  unthinkable  wills 
march 2018 by jerryking
Auction houses embracing digital technology to sell to the new global rich
SEPTEMBER 18, 2014 by: John Dizard.

....The auction houses have been under pressure to adapt to this changing universe. While the most visible aspect of the houses’ digital revolution may be their online auctions, the most essential is in the systematising and networking of their customer, market and lot information. Without that, the auctioneers would lose control of their ability to charge gross margins in the mid-teens as intermediaries of the $30bn global art auction market....Within the quasi-duopoly of Christie’s and Sotheby’s at the top of the auction world, Christie’s has now moved to implement what it calls its “digital strategy”....Christie’s now has James Map (as in founder James Christie), a sort of private internal social network that allows specialists, client service staff, support staff and executives to see what is known about a client and his tastes. Past auction records, relatives’ purchases and sales, statistical inferences on how likely clients are to move from buying an expensive watch online to participating in a high-end evening sale – it all can be in the mix.

The idea, Murphy explains, was “to create an internal app that spiders into our database of information and brings up on our internal [screen] environment lots of connectivity. This is faster and better than the email chains [that it replaced].”....This summer, Sotheby’s announced a partnership with eBay, the online auction giant. While the details of the partnership are still being developed, it is understood eBay will distribute live Sotheby’s auctions to its global audience of 150m buyers.

Ken Citron, Christie’s head of IT

The digital strategy is also making it easier to take part in auctions. Even with all the unseen know-your-customer checks now required by financial supervisory agencies, it has become much faster and easier to register as an auction house client. About half now do so online.

But while the online revolution may have left some auction houses behind, for others it is generating new business. Auction houses used to regard the sale of smaller, cheaper objects from, for example, estate liquidations as an annoying loss-leader business that just wasted their specialists’ time. Now, however, many are making money selling objects for $2,000-$3,000; it’s just a matter of cutting transaction costs. “We have a new app with which you can take a picture, push a button, and it goes to a specialist, with a description. Then the specialist can decide if it might fit into an auction,” says Citron.
auctions  Sotheby's  Christie's  data  art  collectors  high_net_worth  partnerships  eBay  duopolies  digital_strategies  CRM  IT  margins  intermediaries  internal_systems  loss_leaders  transaction_costs  cost-cutting  know_your_customer  Bottom_of_the_Pyramid  estate_planning  liquidity_events  online_auctions  digital_revolution 
november 2016 by jerryking
Upper Class: Why the Rich Are Heading Back to School - WSJ.com
January 17, 2007 | WSJ | By RACHEL EMMA SILVERMAN.
Upper Class: Why the Rich Are Heading Back to School
As Managing Wealth Grows More Complex, Many Seek To Sharpen Financial Savvy
high_net_worth  wealth_management  estate_planning  Wharton  family_office  education  financial_literacy  personal_finance 
august 2012 by jerryking
The Family Office: A Must Have for the Wealthy Elite
September 25- October 1, 2006 | Orange County Business Journal | by Micah Denison
family_office  wealth_management  high_net_worth  estate_planning 
august 2012 by jerryking
Your Work Is Never Done, Retirement and Estate Planning Article
Nov 1, 1997 | Inc. Magazine | by Steven Berglas.Dr. Steven Berglas is a management consultant and a psychologist on the faculty of Harvard Medical School...There are many ways to explain why vital, productive, and creative company builders balk at the prospect of becoming professionally inactive during retirement. In fact, it is not difficult to understand why a person who gets a lot of psychological lifts from a career would view surrendering them as undesirable. A few things about passive retirement to bear in mind include: 1. The bigger you are, the harder you will fall. 2. If you have grown accustomed to the limelight, stay out in the sun.
CEOs  entrepreneur  estate_planning  inactivity  retirement  Second_Acts 
may 2012 by jerryking
Ten financial steps to take before you die - The Globe and Mail
TIM CESTNICK | Columnist profile | E-mail
From Thursday's Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Nov. 24, 2010
financial_planning  estate_planning  Tim_Cestnick 
april 2011 by jerryking
Are Charity Fundraisers Spying on You?
May 18, 2010 | SmartMoney Magazine | by Anne Kadet. Donor
research isn’t new, of course. In a bygone era, fund-raising sleuths
spent days at the library and county clerk’s office, scribbling facts on
index cards. More recently, major charities have spent large sums on
donor data to prepare for capital campaigns. But now, for as little as
$3,000 a year, even smaller nonprofits—like the Cape Cod Commercial Hook
Fishermen’s Association—can use databases that estimate everything from
a donor’s net worth to the size of her mortgage. According to nonprofit
marketing-research firm Campbell Rinker, nearly half of all charities
now use these tools to research donors.
privacy  charities  target_marketing  scuttlebutt  hospitals  nonprofit  fundraising  data_mining  high_net_worth  personal_finance  estate_planning 
may 2010 by jerryking
Whose Business Will This Be? - WSJ.com
March 17, 2008 WSJ article by Jilian Mincer on estate planning when one child works for the company but the others don't
estate_planning  small_business  entrepreneur  family_business 
february 2009 by jerryking

Copy this bookmark:





to read