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jerryking : ethnography   13

The Power of 'Thick' Data - WSJ.com
By
Christian Madsbjerg and
Mikkel B. Rasmussen
March 21, 2014

companies that rely too much on the numbers, graphs and factoids of Big Data risk insulating themselves from the rich, qualitative reality of their customers' everyday lives. They can lose the ability to imagine and intuit how the world—and their own businesses—might be evolving. By outsourcing our thinking to Big Data, our ability to make sense of the world by careful observation begins to wither, just as you miss the feel and texture of a new city by navigating it only with the help of a GPS.

Successful companies and executives work to understand the emotional, even visceral context in which people encounter their product or service, and they are able to adapt when circumstances change. They are able to use what we like to call Thick Data.
thick_data  massive_data_sets  Lego  ethnography  visceral  storytelling  social_data  observations  Samsung  consumer_research  imagination  skepticism  challenges  problems  sense-making  emotions  contextual 
march 2014 by jerryking
Intel’s Sharp-Eyed Social Scientist
FEB. 15, 2014 | NYT |By NATASHA SINGER.

Dr. Bell’s title at Intel, the world’s largest producer of semiconductors, is director of user experience research at Intel Labs, the company’s research arm. She runs a skunk works of some 100 social scientists and designers who travel the globe, observing how people use technology in their homes and in public. The team’s findings help inform the company’s product development process, and are also often shared with the laptop makers, automakers and other companies that embed Intel processors in their goods.
Intel  UX  anthropologists  semiconductors  observations  product_development  ethnography  consumer_research  anthropology  automotive_industry  laptops  social_science 
february 2014 by jerryking
Pulling More Meaning from Big Data
August 2013 | Retail Leader | By Ed Avis

"A.G. Lafley [Procter & Gamble's CEO] spoke of the two moments of truth," says John Ross, president of Inmar Analytics based in Winston-Salem, N.C. "The first occurs when a consumer buys a product, and the second when they use it. Much of the data today is about orchestrating and understanding those two moments. But two additional moments of truth are emerging to bookend Lafley's. One occurs when a consumer is planning to make a purchase. The other happens following use, when the consumer talks about his or her experience with the product. All of these activities leave a 'data wake' that describes how the consumer is moving down the path to purchase." (jk: going to assume that data wake = exhaust data).

Like most consumer packaged goods companies, Procter & Gamble relies on data to determine what consumers are looking for. "Consumer insight is at the core of our business model. We approach every brand we make by asking the question, 'What do people really need and want from this product? What does this mean to their lives?' Let me be clear – this is not casual observation. We employ teams of behavioral scientists, researchers, psychologists, even anthropologists to uncover true insight based on intensive research and exploration," said Marc Pritchard, P&G's global marketing and brand building officer, speaking at the Association of National Advertisers' 2012 Annual Conference....Most firms haven't advanced beyond localized analytics and don't fully capitalize on the existing data they have at hand – such as POS data, loyalty club data and social media traffic – according to a 2012 Deloitte study for the Grocery Manufacturers Association.
massive_data_sets  Sobeys  grocery  supermarkets  Safeway  P&G  A.G._Lafley  Kroger  point-of-sale  loyalty_management  customer_insights  insights  CPG  exhaust_data  psychologists  psychology  anthropologists  anthropology  ethnography  behavioural_science  hiring-a-product-to-do-a-specific-job  data  information_sources  moments  moments_of_truth 
december 2013 by jerryking
The Secret Life of Data in the Year 2020
July-August 2012 | World Future Society Vol. 46, No. 4 |By Brian David Johnson.

A futurist for Intel shows how geotags, sensor outputs, and big data are changing the future. He argues that we need a better understanding of our relationship with the data we produce in order to build the future we want....Data is only useful and indeed powerful when it comes into contact with people.

This brings up some interesting questions and fascinating problems to be solved from an engineering standpoint. When we are architecting these algorithms, when we are designing these systems, how do we make sure they have an understanding of what it means to be human? The people writing these algorithms must have an understanding of what people will do with that data. How will it fit into their lives? How will it affect their daily routine? How will it make their lives better?...the only way to make sense of all this complex information—by viewing data, massive data sets, and the algorithms that really utilize big data as being human. Data doesn’t spring full formed from nowhere. Data is created, generated, and recorded. And the unifying principle behind all of this data is that it was all created by humans. We create the data, so essentially our data is an extension of ourselves, an extension of our humanity.
future  data  algorithms  Intel  sensors  massive_data_sets  storytelling  ethnography  questions  sense-making 
july 2013 by jerryking
Interview: The cellphone anthropologist
11 June 2008 | New Scientist | by Jason Palmer.

How do phones fit in?
The common denominator between cultures, regardless of age, gender or context is: keys, money and,
if you own one, a mobile phone. Why those three objects? Without wanting to sound hyperbolic,
essentially it boils down to survival. Keys provide access to warmth and shelter, money is a very
versatile tool that can buy food, transport and so on. A mobile phone, people soon realise, is a great
tool for recovering from emergency situations, especially if the first two fail.

What uses surprised you?
In a country like Uganda, most mobile phones are prepay. What we saw was that people are using their
phones as a kind of money transfer system. They would buy prepaid credit in the city, ring up a phone
kiosk operator in a village, read out the number associated with that credit so that the kiosk operator
could top up their own phone, then ask that the credit be passed on to someone in the village - say,
their sister - in cash....

With this level of informal innovation going on, can you bring anything extra to the table?
I'm not going to give you the bland corporate answer - "we do this research and then six months later a
product drops off the factory line that perfectly reflects our vision" - because the world is much messier
and more interesting than that. But, for instance, we did a study on phone sharing in Uganda and
Indonesia, and within a year - which is really quick when you're talking about hardware changes - we
had two products out which support multiple address books,
Nokia  interviews  anthropology  mobile_phones  UX  prepaid  emerging_markets  Uganda  credit  Jan_Chipcase  ethnography  Indonesia  anthropologists  insights  new_products 
october 2011 by jerryking
A Shout-Out for Segmentation Data - BusinessWeek
March 15, 2011, BusinessWeek By G. Michael Maddock and
Raphael Louis Vitón .Quit yawning and start seizing on the wealth
within segmentation data. Every department should demand to see this
information. a simple, three-part formula:

Step 1. Define success. Get as specific as possible. Step 2. Define the
characteristics you want your segment to have. Step 3. "Simply" find
what predicts/correlates with these variables.

Having decided whom you want to go after, find the variables that will
lead you to these people. Asking Lots of Questions

Having identified this market, you go out and ask the potential
customers within it as many questions as you can think of—how much they
weigh, what snacks they eat, whether they have kids or a pet. Then you
sort through the data and look for commonalities (Step 3).
segmentation  market_segmentation  market_research  questions  JCK  sorting  correlations  predictive_analytics  ethnography  think_threes 
march 2011 by jerryking
How America's Top Military Officer Uses Business to Boost National Security
May 1, 2010 | Fast Company | Jeff Chu. "He wanted to know what
kind of environment can be created in which business can thrive and
what role govts. have to play," "What is it that makes businesses
successful?" What does this have to do with his job or the military's?
"Our financial health is directly related to our national security,"
"The biggest driver globally is the economy ... I need to understand the
global trends that work those engines. Where are these guys putting
their $? If they're betting on certain outcomes -- good or bad -- why?"
Mullen's principles on the use of US military force: don't go it alone;
don't be overweight in foreign policy; closer coordination between
military and civilian agencies. "If his advice were only how to fight
hi-tech wars, and if his solution were just to apply more force, he
would be less relevant," Brent Scowcroft, "He recognizes that the new
face of war is a very complex...part combat, part nation building, and
part hearts and minds."
leadership  U.S._military  JCS  Michael_Mullen  nation_building  ethnography  geopolitics  21st._century  indispensable  storytelling  messaging  generalship  security_&_intelligence  Brent_Scowcroft  strategic_thinking  questions  war  warfare  complexity  curiosity  APNSA 
april 2010 by jerryking
The Science Of Desire
JUNE 5, 2006 | BusinessWeek | By Spencer E. Ante, with Cliff
Edwards in San Mateo, Calif. Ethnographers, are a species of
anthropologist who can, among other things, identify what's missing in
people's lives -- the perfect cell phone, home appliance, or piece of
furniture -- and work with designers and engineers to help dream up
products and services to fill those needs.... The beauty of ethnography,
say its proponents, is that it provides a richer understanding of
consumers than does traditional research. Yes, companies are still using
focus groups, surveys, and demographic data to glean insights into the
consumer's mind. But closely observing people where they live and work,
say executives, allows companies to zero in on their customers'
unarticulated desires. Ethnographers' findings often don't lead to a
product or service, only a generalized sense of what people want. Their
research can also take a long time to bear fruit.
ethnography  consumer_research  market_entry  GE  emerging_markets  embryonic  anthropologists  anthropology  observations  unarticulated_desires 
january 2010 by jerryking
Want to join the great innovators?
17/09/07 G&M article by DAVID DUNNE.

Designers approach problems differently than typical business people. In
contrast to the analytical perspective taken in business, designers
excel in framing and reframing problems and in collaborating with others
to develop solutions.

These six components - systems thinking, prototyping, ethnography,
diversity, imagination and constraints - to the design process.
design  design_thinking  innovation  systems_thinking  trial_&_error  reframing  prototyping  ethnography  diversity  imagination  constraints  problem_framing 
march 2009 by jerryking

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