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jerryking : events   21

Another Arnault Steps Into the Spotlight
NOV. 7, 2017 | The New York Times | By ELIZABETH PATON.

Clos19, LVMH’s first e-boutique and travel experience agency dedicated to Champagne, wines and spirits, had its debut in the United States, via a fizz-fueled soiree in New York. The focus of Ms. Watine Arnault’s brainchild, she said after the party, is on the “art of hosting” in the 21st century.

So what, one wonders, does that entail? Clos19 isn’t exactly an online bottle shop. Yes, you can order crates of LVMH’s finest drinks brands, like Dom Pérignon, Veuve Cliquot, Belvedere or Hennessy, to be delivered to your door in 24 hours. But you can also specify the temperature of the deliveries, and the glassware to go with it. Tastings or consultations with in-house experts will be regularly offered, as is event planning for weddings and dinner parties.

Clos19 also offers access to LVMH cellars or experiences designed around the spirits, including a fire-and-ice tasting in Antarctica or yachting off the Cloudy Bay vineyards in New Zealand. The lowest-priced experience is about $230, with the cost of luxury scaling up from there to dizzying heights.
LVMH  digital_strategies  Clos19  liquor  events  curation  brands  luxury  family-owned_businesses  Champagne  experiential_marketing 
november 2017 by jerryking
The Not-So-Glossy Future of Magazines -
SEPT. 23, 2017 | The New York Times | By SYDNEY EMBER and MICHAEL M. GRYNBAUM.

Suddenly, it seemed, longstanding predictions about the collapse of magazines had come to pass.

Magazines have sputtered for years, their monopoly on readers and advertising erased by Facebook, Google and more nimble online competitors. But editors and executives said the abrupt churn in the senior leadership ranks signaled that the romance of the business was now yielding to financial realities.

As publishers grasp for new revenue streams, a ‘‘try-anything’’ approach has taken hold. Time Inc. has a new streaming TV show, “Paws & Claws,” that features viral videos of animals. Hearst started a magazine with the online rental service Airbnb. Increasingly, the longtime core of the business — the print product — is an afterthought, overshadowed by investments in live events, podcasts, video, and partnerships with outside brands.

The changes represent one of the most fundamental shifts in decades for a business that long relied on a simple formula: glossy volumes thick with high-priced ads.

“Sentimentality is probably the biggest enemy for the magazine business,” David Carey, the president of Hearst Magazines, said in an interview. “You have to embrace the future.”.......experiments are part of an industrywide race to find some way — any way — to make up for the hemorrhaging of revenue.

Hearst recently introduced The Pioneer Woman Magazine, a partnership with the Food Network host Ree Drummond that was initially sold only at Walmart. Its new travel publication, Airbnbmag, is geared toward customers of the do-it-yourself online rental site, with distribution at newsstands, airports and supermarkets. Meredith has started a magazine called The Magnolia Journal with the HGTV stars Chip and Joanna Gaines.

Even Condé Nast, the glitzy purveyor of luxury titles, has recognized the advantages of outside partnerships....debuting a quarterly print title for Goop, Gwyneth Paltrow’s lifestyle brand, with a cover featuring a topless Ms. Paltrow submerged in mud from France.
magazines  generational_change  brands  Vanity_Fair  print_journalism  churn  events  partnerships  sentimentality  digital_media  journalism  Hearst  Meredith  publishing  advertising  decline  experimentation  trends  Condé_Nast  resignations  exits  popular_culture 
september 2017 by jerryking
How Data Is Revolutionizing The Sports Business
March 10, 2017 | Forbes | By Robert Tuchman , CONTRIBUTOR who writes about live events, deals, and brand marketing.

A top-notch record might be chalked-up to the right players and exceptional coaching, but a team’s increased brand awareness can be credited to its effective use of newly sourced data. The Panthers have been able to grow its business in a multitude of ways since it started acquiring and using key fan data....[there is] an array of data companies who are looking to assist organizations in this area.

Many of these emerging companies access information through individual data systems, third-party vendors, and social media sites. Beyond educating teams about the buyer of their tickets, these companies are helping teams better understand the individuals entering their building. This insight is a game-changer for teams as it can help to better service existing fans and develop new ones. To better service its fans, the Panthers created unique events that catered to their interests, which they learned from their data. For example, in a game against the Colorado Avalanche, Florida hosted an evening honoring the Grateful Dead. The Panthers organization secured a well-known and beloved Florida cover band, Unlimited Devotion, to play the hits of the legendary musical icons. Incentivizing “Dead Heads” to purchase tickets via the Internet, limited edition memorabilia was made available only for online ticket purchasers, with a portion of the profits going to the Grateful Dead's non-profit organization. These types of cross promotions work best when you understand the specific interests of your fans.

And the results are in. The Miami Herald reported that during the 2015-2016 season, attendance went up 33.5 % from the previous season. In addition, season ticket renewals are reportedly increasing at four or five times last year’s rate......In today’s fragmented world, it is more important than ever for teams to generate loyalty and create a personalized customer experience. As in the case of the Florida Panthers, the greater involvement a fan may have in a team’s activities, the greater the possibility they migrate from their living rooms to the venue. More fans equal more sponsors, which leads to greater revenue for teams.

Data companies can help teams better understand its fans. Innovative sports franchises are figuring out how to use this data to create stronger engagements with their actual fans.
sports  data  data_driven  Moneyball  event-driven  events  event_marketing  fans  fan_engagement  musical_performances  cross-promotion  customer_loyalty  personalization  customer_experience 
august 2017 by jerryking
Oak View Group – We are here to be a positive disruption to business as usual in the sports and live entertainment industry.
Messrs. Irving Azoff and Tim Leiweke could use conferences to help Oak View Group, their venue-management company, which collects annual fees from about two dozen arenas in exchange for sponsorships, event booking and other services.
disruption  back-office  sports  live_performances  sponsorships  events  arenas  Tim_Leiweke  entertainment_industry 
april 2017 by jerryking
Building an Empire on Event Data – The Event Log
Michelle WetzlerFollow
Chief Data Scientist @keen_io
Mar 31

Facebook, Google, Amazon, and Netflix have built their businesses on event data. They’ve invested hundreds of millions behind data scientists and engineers, all to help them get to a deep understanding and analysis of the actions their users or customers take, to inform decisions all across their businesses.
Other companies hoping to compete in a space where event data is crucial to their success must find a way to mirror the capabilities of the market leaders with far fewer resources. They’re starting to do that with event data platforms like Keen IO.
What does “Event Data” mean?
Event data isn’t like its older counterpart, entity data, which describes objects and is stored in tables. Event data describes actions, and its structure allows many rich attributes to be recorded about the state of something at a particular point in time.
Every time someone loads a webpage, clicks an ad, pauses a song, updates a profile, or even takes a step into a retail location, their actions can be tracked and analyzed. These events span so many channels and so many types of interactions that they paint an extremely detailed picture of what captivates customers.
data  data_driven  massive_data_sets  data_scientists  event-driven  events  strategy  engineering  Facebook  Google  Amazon  Netflix 
april 2017 by jerryking
Fast Response to ‘Brexit’ News: A Pop-Up Paper Finds Success in Britain - The New York Times
By NICOLA CLARK SEPT. 13, 2016 | NYT |

“It kind of dawned on me: Here was an audience that was so clearly identifiable and passionate,” said Mr. Kelly, a longtime British newspaper executive who is now chief content officer of Archant, a large British newspaper group. “If there ever was a time for launching a new newspaper, this is it.”

Less than two weeks later, in early July, The New European, a weekly print newspaper, hit newsstands nationwide. The paper, conceived as a finite, monthlong experiment, is now going into its 11th week after proving a surprisingly profitable hit with readers.....Some midsize publishers have focused on portfolios of smaller-scale titles that can be produced using the same infrastructure of presses, distribution and marketing networks. Those economies of scale can significantly reduce the marginal costs — and the risks — of developing new print products....earlier experiments, aimed at general-interest audiences, failed to capture enough demand from readers and advertisers to justify their publishers’ relatively modest initial investments....The New European was conceived as a niche publication--the 48 % of Britons who voted on June 23 to stay in the European Union Since it was meant to be short-lived, Archant avoided spending huge sums on market research or publicity campaigns. “We never set out to actually create a long-term brand,” “The way we structured it was to make money on a four-week run.....successful pop-up titles could be linked to popular political or social movements, or major sporting events like last month’s Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro.
pop-ups  newspapers  digital_media  Brexit  experimentation  new_products  product_launches  United_Kingdom  economies_of_scale  epiphanies  event-driven  events  social_movements  contextual  cost-structure  print_journalism  short-term  niches  short-lived  sports 
september 2016 by jerryking
Shape My City - TOOLKIT
Shape My City brings the power of networks to your idea, project or organization, helping you create a better Toronto.
Toronto  tools  civics  events  networks 
january 2015 by jerryking
Business travel continues to soar
corporate spending on meetings and events will range from 1.9 per cent to 2.3 per cent of an organization’s top-line revenues. Spending per attendee, per day will increase 7 per cent to 11 per cent based on returning demand combined with the limited number of suppliers of meeting services like hotels, food and beverage, etc.
meetings  conferences  events 
september 2013 by jerryking
TEDx: The Observer's festival of ideas - where inspiration meets action | Technology | The Observer
23 January 2011 | The Observer| John Mulholland.

TED has brought a passion to the spreading of ideas. It's not alone, either: over the past decade, festivals and websites dedicated to discourse and debate have blossomed. In Britain alone, there's the Do Lectures (the Welsh "TED in a tent" in Pembrokeshire), Alain de Botton's School of Life, the Bristol Festival of Ideas, the Battle of Ideas, Editorial Intelligence's Names Not Numbers, Interesting North, Interesting South, the Cambridge Festival of Ideas, the Derby Festival of Ideas… and further afield there's PopTech, the Aspen Ideas Festival, the Adelaide Festival of Ideas or try Google's Zeitgeist, or the Skoll World Forum, or DoSomething.org… and so on. That's a lot of ideas. Mating and breeding and bringing forth other ideas.
conferences  events  TED  ideacity  Aspen_Ideas_Festival  Google_Zeitgeist  zeitgeist 
september 2013 by jerryking
How an endangered Walrus was saved - The Globe and Mail
Sep. 07 2013 | The Globe and Mail | SIMON HOUPT.

The Walrus is no longer just a magazine published 10 times a year; it is a multiplatform brand that finds expression in a tablet edition, a blog, podcasts, e-books, a series of short non-fiction films, speaking events and sometimes even a cruise through the Northwest Passage.

Each feeds the other, sometimes in spirit and promotional force (a podcast may offer a reporter’s reminiscences of grappling with a particular interview subject), and sometimes even financially: The events business, which will present about 30 live events this year, is now one of the primary sources of revenue.

(While other publications, such as The New Yorker, produce live events, those are usually brand-building exercises rather than major sources of revenue.)

The Walrus Foundation, the education-oriented charitable non-profit that publishes the magazine, procures corporate sponsorship, such as the one from RBC for an evening dedicated to conversation about philanthropy.
brands  conferences  content  conversations  endangered  events  Ideacity  magazines  multiplatforms  nonprofit  Simon_Houpt  sponsorships  TED  Walrus 
september 2013 by jerryking
Cirque, Sid Lee team up to create marketing ‘events’ - The Globe and Mail
Jun. 20 2013 | The Globe and Mail | SUSAN KRASHINSKY - MARKETING REPORTER.

Cirque du Soleil is bringing its sense for spectacle to the marketing world, teaming up with Montreal ad agency Sid Lee to launch a branded entertainment company. The joint venture will aim to help brands create experiences that people actually want to watch, listen to, and experience. The joint venture, Sid Lee Entertainment, has been a year and a half in the making, and is an attempt to address a fundamental shift in advertising: away from pushing messages to consumers, and toward creating engaging content....Marketers have been approaching Cirque for years to develop entertainment projects, Mr. Lamarre said, but the company was unable to figure out how to do that without having it conflict with its own brand.

The goal is to create events engaging enough that the brands behind them can sell tickets, Mr. Cesvet said – and to potentially create a new economic model for an industry in flux.

“With advertising, we’re still selling hours,” he said. “What we want to do with this entertainment division is transform the revenue stream of our business … what clients expect from agencies is a lot more complex. You have to do an app, you have to do interactive experiences. I don’t think the value is recognized.”
marketing  branding  brands  Cirque_du_Soleil  Montreal  fascination  advertising_agencies  partnerships  joint_ventures  events  event_marketing  ideaCity  product_launches  customer_experience  experiential_marketing  content_creators  live_performances  interactivity  inbound  entertainment  Sid_Lee  Susan_Krashinsky  creating_valuable_content 
june 2013 by jerryking
The fight of Richard Rainwater's life - Fortune Management
November 7, 2011 | Fortune | By Peter Elkind and Patricia Sellers, with Doris Burke.
The renowned dealmaker built a fortune using little besides his wits. Now he's funding a crash program to stop the disease that's destroying his mind.

Rainwater's deals were just as eclectic and creative. But a pattern quickly emerged. Rainwater always looked for a big event. A blowup in energy prices. A revolution in health care reimbursements. A real estate bubble. Then he looked for a powerful way to exploit the upheaval -- not just to bet the trend but to turbocharge the bet. To snatch up drilling assets at panic-sale prices and hand them to the oil patch's most astute operator. To build a chain of super-efficient hospitals. To buy premium downtown office space (the quickest to bounce back) on the cheap after a market crash.
Richard_Rainwater  dealmakers  Bass_brothers  creativity  big_bets  discontinuities  bubbles  turbocharge  event-driven  events  leverage 
november 2011 by jerryking
Gulf Oil Spill's Fallout Widens Debate on Government's Proper Role - WSJ.com
MAY 28, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By GERALD F. SEIB. New
Rules in an Old Tug-of-War. A presidential commission soon will put
the relationship (govt.-offshore oil industry) in therapy. The risk is
that the wrong question may dominate the coming discussion—namely,
whether there was too little regulation of the offshore oil industry.
The better question is less about quantity than quality: Were
regulations smart and up to date? They almost certainly weren't. ...The
broader point is that the BP oil spill is just the latest in a series of
traumatic events forcing a rethink of government's relationship with
business. Bank bailouts, energy plans, auto-maker rescues, Toyota
accelerator problems: All have forced both politicians and average
Americans to rethink the proper role of government in the private
economy.
bailouts  Gerald_Seib  government  private_sector  BP  oil_spills  regulation  event-driven  events  regulators  business-government_relations  politicians  offshore  offshore_drilling  questions 
may 2010 by jerryking
Building Brand Runways
Jul 8, 2009 | Fast Company | by Joel Rubinson. Runways are
relationships your company can create with trading partners and
consumers that make your brands accessible, and give YOU access to
markets and marketing options you otherwise would not have. Ducati
motorcycles' sponsorship and hospitality presence (and winning record)
at the Superbike World Championship events is a runway into enthusiast
sports biking communities around the world.
sponsorships  branding  Ducati  motorcycles  Italian  marketing  events  event_marketing  relationships  Communicating_&_Connecting 
december 2009 by jerryking

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