recentpopularlog in

jerryking : execution   45

Be a Potentiator - Mike Lipkin
April 25, 2019 | @ #CAIF2019 | Presentation and speech By Mike Lipkin.

1. Be Self-Savvy: Define your principles. Discern your impact. Play your role. Know what drives you. Know how you’re occurring to others. Know their expectations of you. Know thyself and thy relationship with others.
2. Develop Situational Sensibility: Get out there. Know the trends. Connect the dots. Context is decisive. Whoever understands their environment best wins. So expand your footprint. Study the data until it tells the truth. Anticipate the future by getting there first. Become your peers’ scout. Discover the new world for yourself and other will want to join you.
3. Make a Powerful Promise: Declare your purpose. Express your value proposition. Focus your execution. Know your personal mission. Know the unique benefit you give to others. Act accordingly. So my mission is to turn people into potentiators. My unique benefit is to excite people into remarkable action. I’m executing my promise through motivational messages like this one in any way I can. What are you doing?
4. Become Sublimely Skilled: Practice for real. Become the authority. Make it a pleasure. Whatever your level, be the best at that level. Learn from every experience. Communicate your knowledge with conviction. Light others up with your joie de vivre.
5. Build Robust Resilience: Interpret to win. Be prolific. Train like an athlete. We’re only as good as the stories that we tell ourselves. Make whatever happens meaningful. Do more things. Put the odds on your side. And train, train, train. Stamina is the rocket fuel of champions.
6. Grow Courageous Creativity: Unleash your imagination. Experiment like Edison. Talk, listen, learn. Dare to dream then declare your dream. Turn it into reality by trying something new. Fail fast until you fly high. Get in front of people and give them great conversation. Enrich their perspective while you expand yours.
7. Be Fanatically Faithworthy: Commit to your commitments. Come through in the crunch. Be the best you can be, every day. If you say it, do it. Make your word the one thing that others can always depend on. Become the go-to-person in a crisis. And, whatever happens, bring your A-Game every time. You can’t always be the best, but you can always be the best you can be that day.
8. Create Close Connections: Give First. Open yourself up. Become an insider. Generosity pays big dividends. Show what you can give them and others will show you the money. Get up, close and personal. Become integral to others’ wellbeing. If you build their trust, they will pay it forward all the way back to you.
9. Communicate Like a Champion: Say it like you mean it. Talk their language. Connect them to their purpose. How you say what you say is as important as what you say. Let your authenticity shine through but inject it with your passion. Be the reason why other people rediscover why they make a difference.
10. Cause Bold Breakthroughs: Own it. Celebrate the struggle. Finish like a professional. It’s not about the title. It’s about your skin in the game. It’s about taking on the responsibility for everyone else’s success, no matter what. You can’t always win, but you can always play to win. It’s meant to be hard. The pain is the price you pay to be a potentiator. Close strong and the force will be with you.
breakthroughs  CAIF  commitments  Communicating_&_Connecting  connecting_the_dots  execution  inspiration  It's_up_to_me  motivations  purpose  self-made  serving_others  skin_in_the_game  torchbearers  value_propositions  Mike_Lipkin  code_switching 
april 2019 by jerryking
The Pop-Up Employer: Build a Team, Do the Job, Say Goodbye -
JULY 12, 2017 | The New York Times | By NOAM SCHEIBER.

Two Stanford biz profs, Melissa Valentine and Michael Bernstein, have introduced the idea of “flash organizations” — ephemeral setups to execute a single, complex project in ways traditionally associated with corporations, nonprofit groups or governments.....information technology has made the flash organization a suddenly viable form across a number of industries.....intermediaries are already springing up across industries like software and pharmaceuticals to assemble such organizations. They rely heavily on data and algorithms to determine which workers are best suited to one another, and also on decidedly lower-tech innovations, like middle management......Temporary organizations capable of taking on complicated projects have existed for decades, e.g. Hollywood, where producers assemble teams of directors, writers, actors, costume and set designers and a variety of other craftsmen and technicians to execute projects with budgets in the tens if not hundreds of millions.....Jody Miller, a former media executive and venture capitalist, a co-founder of the Business Talent Group, sets up temporary teams of freelancers for corporations. “We’re the producers,” Ms. Miller said. “We understand how to evaluate talent, pick the team.”.....
Three lessons stand out across the flash-type models. First is that the platforms tend to be highly dependent on data and computing power....Second is the importance of well-established roles. ...Third, there is perhaps the least likely of innovations: middle management. The typical freelancer performs worker-bee tasks. Flash-like organizations tend to combine both workers and managers...........Flash organizations have obvious limits....they tend to work best for projects with well-defined life spans, not continuing engagements....“The bottleneck now is project managers,” ... “It’s a really tough position to fill.”.....even while fostering flexibility, the model could easily compound insecurity. Temporary firms are not likely to provide health or retirement benefits. ..... the anxiety is legitimate, but these platforms could eventually dampen insecurity by playing a role that companies have historically played: providing benefits, topping off earnings if workers’ freelance income is too low or too spotty, even allowing workers to organize.
pop-ups  freelancing  on-demand  ephemerality  producers  execution  Hollywood  project_management  teams  data  algo  lessons_learned  Business_Talent_Group  Gigster  Artella  Foundry  Slack  pharmaceutical_industry  Outsourcing  contractors  job_insecurity  middle_management  gig_economy  ad_hoc  dissolutions  short-term  short-lived 
july 2017 by jerryking
MBA Mondays: Turning Your Team
August 12, 2013 | – AVC | Fred Wilson.

A serial entrepreneur I know tells me "you will turn your team three times on the way from startup to a business of scale." What he means is that the initial team will depart, replaced by another team, which in turn will be replaced by yet another team....Companies scale and the team needs to scale with it. That often means turning the team.

The "turning your team" thing probably makes sense to most people. But executing it is where things get tricky and hard. How are you going to push out the person who built the first product almost all by themselves? How are you going to push out the person who brought in the first customer? How are you going to tell the person who managed your first user community so deftly that their services are no longer needed by your company?

And when do you need to do this and in what order? It's not like you tell your entire senior team to leave on the same day. So the execution of all of this is hard and getting the timing right is harder.
advice  business  scaling  teams  start_ups  Fred_Wilson  turning_your_team  turnarounds  execution  judgment  serial_entrepreneur  think_threes 
october 2016 by jerryking
Why It’s Not Enough Just to Be Disruptive - The New York Times
By JEREMY G. PHILIPS AUG. 10, 2016

Short-term success may be driven by exceptional execution; long-term value creation requires building a defensible model.

Any microeconomics textbook will tell you there are limited sources of competitive advantage. The most valuable companies combine several reinforcing strands, like scale and customer loyalty.....

While it is hard to stay ahead solely through superior execution over an extended period, it is sometimes enough in the short term to draw a deep-pocketed buyer where there are strong, immediate synergies. Creating enormous value over the long term requires turning a tactical edge into some form of durable advantage....Superior tactical execution can still create real value, particularly where it provides ammunition for a bigger war (like Walmart’s battle with Amazon). And in the long term, value is created not by disruption, but by weaving together advantages (as both Amazon and Walmart have done in different ways) that together create a barrier that is hard to storm.
disruption  value_creation  Gillette  competitive_advantage  execution  books  slight_edge  Amazon  Wal-Mart  microeconomics  short-term  long-term  barriers_to_entry  compounded  kaleidoscopic  unfair_advantages  endurance  synergies  M&A  mergers_&_acquisitions 
august 2016 by jerryking
Death by digital: CEOs pay the price for tech trouble - The Globe and Mail
ANDREW WILLIS
The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Jul. 14, 2016

Recent changes in the executive suite at Canadian Tire, Sobeys and Torstar show there’s little tolerance for a boss who lacks a smart strategy for an increasingly tech-driven marketplace and even less patience for a leader who fails to deliver on digital promises....It’s this ability to blend tech savvy with the rest of the management tool box – finance, marketing, leadership – that’s essential to CEO success in every field, and critical in sectors such as retail, media and financial services. Because when the tech strategy doesn’t work, corporate boards are clearly holding the CEO responsible. That accountability was not as direct in the past: The head of IT was more likely to be sacrificed, rather than the CEO. Now, the top boss is being held responsible for coming up with the tech-based strategy and executing.
Andrew_Willis  boards_&_directors_&_governance  C-suite  CEOs  CIOs  digital_first  digital_savvy  digital_strategies  execution  IT  strategies  systems_integration 
july 2016 by jerryking
The Mind of Marc Andreessen - The New Yorker
MAY 18, 2015 | New Yorker | BY TAD FRIEND.

Doug Leone, one of the leaders of Sequoia Capital, by consensus Silicon Valley’s top firm, said, “The biggest outcomes come when you break your previous mental model. The black-swan events of the past forty years—the PC, the router, the Internet, the iPhone—nobody had theses around those. So what’s useful to us is having Dumbo ears.”* A great V.C. keeps his ears pricked for a disturbing story with the elements of a fairy tale. This tale begins in another age (which happens to be the future), and features a lowborn hero who knows a secret from his hardscrabble experience. The hero encounters royalty (the V.C.s) who test him, and he harnesses magic (technology) to prevail. The tale ends in heaping treasure chests for all, borne home on the unicorn’s back....Marc Andreessen is tomorrow’s advance man, routinely laying out “what will happen in the next ten, twenty, thirty years,” as if he were glancing at his Google calendar. He views his acuity as a matter of careful observation and extrapolation, and often invokes William Gibson’s observation “The future is already here—it’s just not very evenly distributed.”....Andreessen applies a maxim from his friend and intellectual sparring partner Peter Thiel, who co-founded PayPal and was an early investor in LinkedIn and Yelp. When a reputable venture firm leads two consecutive rounds of investment in a company, Andreessen told me, Thiel believes that that is “a screaming buy signal, and the bigger the markup on the last round the more undervalued the company is.” Thiel’s point, which takes a moment to digest, is that, when a company grows extremely rapidly, even its bullish V.C.s, having recently set a relatively low value on the previous round, will be slightly stuck in the past. The faster the growth, the farther behind they’ll be....When a16z began, it didn’t have even an ersatz track record to promote. So Andreessen and Horowitz consulted on tactics with their friend Michael Ovitz, who co-founded the Hollywood talent agency Creative Artists Agency, in 1974. Ovitz told me that he’d advised them to distinguish themselves by treating the entrepreneur as a client: “Take the long view of your platform, rather than a transactional one. Call everyone a partner, offer services the others don’t, and help people who aren’t your clients. Disrupt to differentiate by becoming a dream-execution machine.”
Marc_Andreessen  Andreessen_Horowitz  Silicon_Valley  transactional_relationships  venture_capital  vc  Peter_Thiel  long-term  far-sightedness  Sequoia  mindsets  observations  partnerships  listening  insights  Doug_Leone  talent_representation  CAA  mental_models  warning_signs  signals  beforemath  unevenly_distributed  low_value  extrapolations  acuity  professional_service_firms  Michael_Ovitz  execution  William_Gibson 
may 2015 by jerryking
Five questions to hone your business strategy - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Sep. 28 2014

1. Why does our business deserve to succeed?
2. What would a new CEO do?
3. Imagine it is three to six years in the future and the proposed strategy has been unsuccessful. Why did it fail?
4. What would have to be true for our strategy to succeed?
5. Would I put my own money into this?
strategy  business_planning  Harvey_Schachter  execution  effectiveness  assumptions  anticipating  questions  biases  overconfidence  self-delusions  skin_in_the_game 
september 2014 by jerryking
The Impossibility of Reparations
JUN 3 2014 | - The Atlantic | DAVID FRUM.

If “reparations” means remembrance and repentance for the wrongs of the past, then let’s have reparations. Americans tell a too-flattering version of their national story. They treat slavery as ancillary rather than essential. They forget that the work of slaves paid this country’s import bill from the 17th century until 1860. They do not acknowledge that the “freedom” championed by slaveholding Founding Fathers, including the author of the Declaration of Independence, included the freedom to own other human beings as property. They can no longer notice how slavery is stitched into every line of the Constitution and was supported by every single early national institution. The self-reckoning we see in Germany and other European countries does not come easily to Americans—and is still outright rejected by many.
slavery  myths  origin_story  reparations  Ta-Nehisi_Coates  African-Americans  racial_disparities  execution  affirmative_action  race_relations  David_Frum  slaveholders  Founding_Fathers 
june 2014 by jerryking
Burberry's Rose Marie Bravo Designs Ways to Keep Brand Growing and Still Exclusive
September 9, 2004 | THE WALL STREET JOURNAL Page B1 | By SALLY BEATTY
Staff Reporter

FASHIONABLE TIPS

Lessons from Rose Marie Bravo on rebuilding and sustaining a hot brand:

• Lesson 1: Do...
Burberry  fashion  branding  brands  CEOs  reinvention  dissatisfaction  execution  teams  exclusivity 
february 2014 by jerryking
Four Lessons from Rockstar Games: The Innovator...
September 18, 2013 | Quora | by Ross Simmonds [Life & Pixels]
(1) Give The Customers What They Want - When you focus on giving your customers what they want, the media and customers will do the talking for you. Creating an impact doesn't happen by saying you're going to make one. It happens from actually doing it.
(2) Don't Be Afraid To Break The Rules - In business, it's more important than ever to push boundaries. To be successful, you need to do things that other people question but you know is going to be right for your clients, partners, employees or customers. As the world gets smaller, the importance of pushing boundaries and striving for greatness is at an all-time high. When you're thinking about how your business can generate some additional press or how you could win new business - think differently.
(3) Don't Be Afraid To Kill Your Bad Puppies - It's the idea of killing something that is at the core of what makes you feel uncomfortable....In business, the initial stages of customer research and product development are just one part of the puzzle. As you build your business and establish a client base, you're required to make more decisions as new opportunities arise with your business growth. Decision making quickly becomes a key part of your job as you're forced to make choices on a daily basis...It's our obsession with the past and our own creations that hold our businesses back from continuing to evolve and grow.
(4)Take Pride In The Entire Experience--A great business is one that sweats the little things. It's a business that focuses on the minor details and ensures that their entire business is built on the idea of an experience....At the end of the day, you can get excited about using Instagram for a new promotion or work relentlessly on developing a great content marketing strategy but if your product sucks, you'll fail. The key for business success is to be mindful of these four lessons as you build your business and strive to make it grow.
lessons_learned  culling  customer_satisfaction  execution  detail_oriented  games  rule_breaking  customer_centricity  videogames  kill_rates  Pablo_Picasso  innovators  hard_work  think_differently  stage-gate  attrition_rates 
september 2013 by jerryking
99 Percent
July 1, 2004 | | MIT Technology Review | By Joe Chung.

Also featured in:
MIT Technology Review Magazine
July/August 2004
More in this issue »

If genius is 99 percent perspiration (and 1 percent inspiration), then entrepreneurs surely walk the fine line that separates the Einsteins of the world from those poor sweaty souls who practice yoga in saunas. The archetypal startup is the lone inventor in a basement pursuing his or her passion with relentless energy. Somewhere between the original spark of genius and a successfully profitable enterprise, though, lies a maturation process that pits the inventor’s vision against the cold and cynical outlook of the business world. Often the 1 percent-a deep and highly individual creative desire-gets lost amid the desire to look and feel like a “real” company. But it is quirky proclivities combined with the sweat that creates the innovations around which successful businesses are formed.
start_ups  angels  apparel  women  entrepreneur  innovation  execution  proclivities  inspiration 
september 2013 by jerryking
The Internship - Not the Movie - NYTimes.com
By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN
Published: June 8, 2013

Internships are increasingly important today, they explained, because skills are increasingly important in the new economy and because colleges increasingly don’t teach the ones employers are looking for. Experience, rather than a degree, has become an important proxy for skill, they note, and internships give you that experience. So grab one wherever you can, they add, because, even if you’re just serving coffee, it is a way to see how businesses actually work and which skills are prized by employers.... Since so many internships are unpaid these days, added Sedlet, there is a real danger that only “rich kids” can afford them, which will only widen our income gaps. The key, if you get one, he added, is to remember “that companies don’t want generalists to help them think big; they want people who can help them execute” and “add value.”

But what, they were often asked, does “add value” mean? It means, they said, show that you have some creative flair — particularly in design, innovation, entrepreneurship, sales or marketing, skills that can’t be easily replaced by a piece of software, a machine or a cheaper worker in India.
job_search  tips  internships  HireArt  Managing_Your_Career  value_creation  new_graduates  experience  thinking_big  value_added  creativity  imagination  execution  Tom_Friedman  non-routine  in-person  special_sauce 
june 2013 by jerryking
Operational Expertise Makes the Difference
Fall 2004 | The Journal of Private Equity | Peter L. Tourtellot

In the last decade, companies in need of innovative change-agents learned to look outside their industries for new chief executives. These leaders were just what the companies needed: outsiders with a fresh perspective that
encourage strategic and organizational change. When a company is in distress. it needs to make drastic changes An industry outsider. with a wide range of operational experience is in the best position to get a handle on the root causes of trouble and identify applicable solutions from other industries that may never have occurred to the faltering company. Simply put. the need for industry experience in a turnaround situation is a myth. An industry outsider is the best source for the out-of-the-box thinking needed to reverse a company's decline.
turnarounds  execution  CEOs  private_equity  change_agents  industry_expertise  expertise  operations  outsiders  decline  out-of-the-box  fresh_eyes 
august 2012 by jerryking
The operators at Clayton, Dubilier & Rice
December 1994 | Institutional Investor | by Hilary Rosenberg.
Clayton_Dubilier_Rice  LBOs  private_equity  execution 
july 2012 by jerryking
Technology Implementation and Project Risk
You have to make sure your whole team understands what scarce resource you’re optimizing.
implementation  execution  R&D  testing  risk-assessment  project_management  frameworks 
july 2012 by jerryking
Some Preliminary Thoughts on Action Planning and Implementation
??| |??| John J. Gabarro and Leonard A. Schlesinger.

Establish credibility amongst co-workers by repeated sharing clean, coherent vision and plan of action. Convert vision to strategy.
first90days  execution  implementation  listening  contingency_planning  anticipating  influence  action_plans 
july 2012 by jerryking
Thinking Small
Aug 1, 2004 | Inc.com | John Grossmann.

Alan G. Robinson and Dean M. Schroeder "Ideas Are Free: How the Idea Revolution Is Liberating People and Transforming Organizations".
Her six-show-room chain thrives on new ideas. Fishbein collects them in three-ring binders. Since 1995, she's filled four such binders -- at 10 to 20 ideas per page and 200-plus pages per binder, that's more than 10,000 ideas. And the best ones, she says, often turn out to be those that at first appeared simple, even mundane. "The point," she says, "is not the big hit but incremental improvements all the time."

What about the killer app, the bold, outside-the-box brainstorm that is supposed to transform organizations? If you really care about making ideas work for you, forget such ambitious notions, say Alan G. Robinson and Dean M. Schroeder in their new book Ideas Are Free: How the Idea Revolution Is Liberating People and Transforming Organizations. Rather than big, competition-leapfrogging advances, the authors argue that one of the keys to business success is the constant implementation of small ideas -- just like the steady stream of employee suggestions Fishbein collects in her binders. Why singles instead of home runs? The competition inevitably copies or counters your home runs, rendering those gains ephemeral. But after studying idea-generation tactics at 150 companies in 17 countries, Robinson and Schroeder concluded that small ideas, especially those particular to processes or systems, improve companies in almost Darwinian fashion with ongoing small adaptations that are often impossible to copy.
business  innovation  idea_generation  execution  small_business  slight_edge  ideas  process_improvements  books  minnovation  breakthroughs  incrementalism  marginal_improvements  adaptability  leapfrogging  Darwinian 
july 2012 by jerryking
Maximizing Money
June 11, 2008 | WSJ.com |By EDWARD KOSNER
How to Get Rich
By Felix Dennis

Beneath the braggadocio and buffoonery, Mr. Dennis's book is full of cold-hearted advice for succeeding in any field, some of it familiar, some quite sophisticated. He harps on the essential virtues of stamina, persistence and focus, and on the paramount importance of execution. "If you never have a great idea in your life, but become skilled in executing the great ideas of others," he says, "you can succeed beyond your wildest dreams." It's good to panic in a crisis, he says, because it focuses the mind on what has to be done. Grovel for capital if you need to but always remember: "No deal is a must-do deal."
United_Kingdom  entrepreneur  book_reviews  howto  advice  sophisticated  stamina  persistence  personal_enrichment  focus  execution 
june 2012 by jerryking
Bootstrap Finance: The Art of Start-ups
November-December 1992 | HBR | Amar Bhidé.

(1) get operational fast;
(2) look for quick break-even, cash-generating projects;
(3) offer high-value products or services that can sustain direct personal selling;
(4) don't try to hire the crack team;
(5) keep growth in check;
(6) focus on cash; and
(7) cultivate banks early.
HBR  bootstrapping  hustle  finance  funding  good_enough  start_ups  Amar_Bhidé  fast_followers  copycats  financing  entrepreneur  venture_capital  vc  execution  advice  capital_efficiency  team_risk  market_risk  technology_risk 
june 2012 by jerryking
Second acts
Second acts
Anonymous. Harvard Business Review80. 12 (Dec 2002): 10.
Turn on hit highlighting for speaking browsers
Abstract (summary)
Translate Abstract

Knowledge workers outlive organizations, and they are mobile. Management consultant Peter Drucker says the need to manage oneself is therefore creating a revolution in human affairs. A recently completed study of dozens of men and women - managers and other professionals in their 30s, 40s, and 50s - who attempted to change careers in midstream found that some failed and some succeeded. The study concluded that the best way to escape from an unsatisfying career was to stop thinking and start doing. Professionals have to work their way into a new way of working. Managing career transitions is not only important for individuals, it is crucial for companies as well.
Second_Acts  HBR  knowledge_workers  ProQuest  Peter_Drucker  execution  transitions  Managing_Your_Career 
may 2012 by jerryking
In My Humble Opinion...: Get in the Game!
Again, no disrespect to Winkler, but what separates “The Fonz”
from the guy hawking hand painted scenes of the Caribbean island you
visited last, or the vendor at a fair whose booth is chock full of his
life’s work? How about the guy at the park that takes black chalk and
weathered paper and captures nuances in your face that are so subtle you
never noticed them? I’ll tell you what. Henry Winkler was in the room,
at the game, and they weren’t. Here is my humble advice for the day.
Take stock of the people you spend most of your productive time with and
creative energy on. Are they poised to get you in the room and a ticket
to the game? If not, something needs to change, and chances are they
won’t.

Go get in the game. You’re all pretty smart, I’m sure you’ll figure
the rest out.
inspiration  blogs  execution  JCK 
september 2011 by jerryking
How to Be Like Apple - WSJ.com
AUG. 29, 2011 | WSJ | RACHEL EMMA SILVERMAN. Driving
Innovation: Mgmt. experts say there are specific ways firms can generate
and execute new ideas. Solicit input. Great ideas come from all levels
of the organization, not just the top. Provide workers time for
"unofficial activity," set time to work on creative ideas. Executing
ideas is often tougher than generating them. Companies need a clear
process to prioritize, resource & test ideas quickly and cheaply, so
that they can afford to experiment...Observation can help companies
understand not just what people say they want, but what they really
need. Clay Christensen says P&G's new-product success rate in recent
yrs. came from observing that people were concerned about how their
clothes smell (Febreze) & were always looking for simpler ways to
clean the floor (Swiffer.). P&G overhauled its new-biz strategy
after realizing that just 15% of its ideas, developed in more of an
ad-hoc approach, were meeting revenue & profit targets.
Apple  ideas  idea_generation  innovation  execution  Vijay_Govindarajan  P&G  business_development  Clayton_Christensen  new_products  kill_rates  success_rates  ad_hoc  new_businesses  slack_time  companywide  observations  experimentation  primary_field_research  process-orientation  large_companies  Fortune_500  brands  unarticulated_desires  Michael_McDerment 
august 2011 by jerryking
Jerry Weissman: Practice Makes for a Perfect Presentation | Word Craft - WSJ.com
JUNE 4, 2011 WSJ By JERRY WEISSMAN practice for each
presentation, using a technique that I recommend to every client I've
ever coached: verbalization. This means that you should speak your
presentation aloud in advance just as you plan to do it with your actual
audience, and you should do it several times. This method has analogues
in sports, music and theater, and of course even has its own classic
adage: Practice makes perfect.
Communicating_&_Connecting  execution  howto  practice  presentations 
june 2011 by jerryking
Why Less Brilliant Presidents Do Better - The Informed Reader - WSJ
Jun 18, 2007 | WSJ | Robin Moroney. Extreme intelligence might
undermine a person’s managerial capacity, he speculates. “What is
required at the top levels of govt. is not brilliance, but managerial
skill,” says Posner. That includes knowing “when to defer to the
superior knowledge of a more experienced but less mentally agile
subordinate.” Especially intelligent people also have difficulty
trusting the intuitions of less-articulate people who have more
experience than they do. That might be why many smart senior officials
in govt. have tried to reason their way through problems on their own,
assuming their civil servants’ inadequate explanations rendered their
judgments invalid. Furthermore, many of the situations that presidents
face are defined by uncertainty, rather than complexity. In cases e.g.
Vietnam, where presidents and their inner circle were dealing with an
ambiguous situation, “having great information-processing skills is not
worth a lot if you have no reliable info..”
ambiguities  civil_servants  complexity  execution  experience  Gary_Becker  gut_feelings  intuition  IQ  mental_dexterity  Richard_A._Posner  smart_people  uncertainty  White_House 
october 2010 by jerryking
How to Innovate After a Recession -
Sept. 7, 2010 | BusinessWeek | By Vijay Govindarajan who
outlines a 3-pronged plan for making innovation flourish in a
post-recession environment. Why can't organizations execute innovation,
especially Fortune 500 companies which have such vast resources and
capabilities? (1) The true challenge: execution. Business organizations
are not built for innovation, but for efficiency. Organizations today
are only modestly more prepared for the challenges of innovation than
they were 50 yrs. ago. While most companies have plenty of creativity
and technology, they lack the managerial skills to convert ideas into
reality.(2) Building a special project team. To be successful in
execution, each innovation initiative needs a special kind of team and a
special kind of plan.(3) Conducting the innovation experiment (i)
Formalize the experiment. (ii) Break down the hypothesis.(iii) Seek
the truth.
innovation  recessions  economic_downturn  Vijay_Govindarajan  experimentation  execution  Fortune_500 
september 2010 by jerryking
MARKETING: Selling by doing, not telling
20 Aug 2007| Globe and Mail Blog pg. B.5.| by Harvey Schachter.

MARKETING: SELLING BY DOING, NOT TELLING

If you're selling complex, intangible services, turn your next sales presentation into an action session where the client can sample what it is like to work with you. On RainToday.com, Charles Green tells of the firm that began its pitch session with: "We have 90 minutes with you. We can either do the march of a thousand slides, which we're happy to do, or we can get started now and begin to work with you. After 85 minutes we will stop, and you'll have first-hand experience of exactly how it feels to work with us." Buyers need a way to determine your expertise, and the best route is by offering them a sample rather than hearing you list your achievements.
presentations  execution  marketing  Harvey_Schachter  pitches  action-oriented  experiential_marketing  enterprise_clients  intangibles  services  sales  salesmanship 
march 2010 by jerryking
Good Execution Beats a Bad Idea
Nov 23, 2009 | Fortune Vol. 160, Iss. 10; pg. 42 | by Mina
Kimes. "During my second year at Harvard Business School, I had a
fascinating professor named Gen. Georges Doriot. One of the things he
told me was, You're better off backing a mediocre idea that's
brilliantly implemented than a brilliant idea that's badly executed. My
Advice to You: 1. Reward Efficiency. 2. Ask the Right Questions. 3. Set a
Walking-Away Price 4. Don't Bet on a Recovery 5. Keep Your Cool 6.Study
Before You Leap
Wilbur_Ross  turnarounds  moguls  execution  rules_of_the_game  tips  Georges_Doriot  questions  thinking_tragically  dispassion  preparation  reservation_prices  HBS  efficiencies  asking_the_right_questions 
november 2009 by jerryking
Six Ways Companies Mismanage Risk - HBR.org
March 2009 |Harvard Business Review | by René M. Stulz
(Charles Waud & WaudWare)
Financial risk management is hard to get right in the best of times. Stulz explores 6 ways institutions usually drop the ball:
1. Relying on Historical Data
2. Focussing on narrow measures
3. Overlooking knowable risks
4. Overlooking concealed risks
5. Failing to communicate
6. Not managing in real time
HBR  risk-management  execution  failure  risks  measurements  unknowns  financial_risk  hidden  latent  Communicating_&_Connecting  signaling  real-time  disclosure  mismanagement  overlooked  historical_data 
march 2009 by jerryking
Plotting a Smooth Course When You Take the Helm - WSJ.com
MARCH 23, 2009, 9:41 P.M. ET| The Wall Street Journal| by TODDI GUTNER
* Conduct a review and consider worst-case scenarios.
* Set an agenda and be decisive.
* Communicate constantly.
* Be aware of personal habits.
CEOs  execution  first90days  worst-case 
march 2009 by jerryking
FT.com / Columnists / Luke Johnson - Ideas for challenging times
Published: June 17 2008 FT column By Luke Johnson looking at
how emerging companies can generate new ideas. Recommends a little book
called A Technique for Producing Ideas by James Webb Young. Its thesis
is both simple and applicable to many sorts of problems. The central
premise is that any new idea is in fact only a fresh combination of old
elements, plus the ability to see new relationships between known facts.
What every successful business needs is competent execution--you cannot
patent an idea and protect it from replication by a rival. Companies
are increasingly using their customers--social networking-- to help
design their products and improve their offerings.
books  brainstorming  execution  hard_times  ideas  idea_generation  Luke_Johnson  mental_dexterity  mind-mapping  serial_entrepreneur  social_networking  reinvention 
february 2009 by jerryking

Copy this bookmark:





to read