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Business leaders are blinded by industry boundaries
April 22, 2019 | Financial Times | Rita McGrath.

Why is it so hard for executives to anticipate the major shifts that can determine the destiny of their organisations? Andy Grove called these moments “strategic inflection points”. For some, he wrote, “That change can mean an opportunity to rise to new heights. But it may just as likely signal the beginning of the end.”

Industry leaders would do well to focus on productive opportunities, even when they lie outside a fairly well-bounded industry. Want to survive a strategic inflection point? Stop focusing on traditional metrics and find new customer needs that your organisation can uniquely address.

Why do business leaders so often miss these shifts? Successful companies such as BlackBerry maker Research In Motion and Nokia did not heed the early signs of a move to app-based smartphones. Video rental chain Blockbuster failed to acquire Netflix when it had the chance, in 2000.

Senior people rise to the top by mastering management of the KPIs in that sector. This, in turn, shapes how they look at the world. The problem is a strategic inflection point can occur and render the reference points they have developed obsolete. Take traditional retail. Its key metrics have to do with limited real estate, such as sales per square metre. Introduce the internet and those measures are useless. And yet traditional systems, rewards and measures are all built around them.....British economist Edith Penrose grasped this crucial link, she asked, “What is an industry?” In her studies, executives did not confine themselves to single industries, they expanded into any market where their business might find profitable growth.

Consider the energy sector: Historically, most power generators and utilities were heavily regulated...The sector’s suppliers likewise expected steady demand and a quiet life....that business has been rocked by slow-moving shifts many players talked about, but did not act upon. The rise of distributed energy generation, the maturing of renewable technology, increased conservation and new rules have eroded the traditional model. Many failed to heed the warnings. In 2015, General Electric spent about $10bn to acquire Alstom’s power business. Finance chief Jeff Bornstein crowed at the time that it could be GE’s best acquisition ever. Blinded by traditional metrics, GE doubled down on fossil-fuel-fired turbines just as renewables were becoming cost competitive.

Consider razor blades: Procter & Gamble’s Gillette brand of razors had long enjoyed a competitive advantage. For decades, the company had invested in developing premium products, charged premium prices, invested heavily in marketing and used its clout to get those razors into every traditional retail outlet. A new breed of online rivals such as Dollar Shave Club and Harry’s have upended that model, reselling outsourced razors that were “good enough” and cheaper, online via a subscription model that attracted younger, economically pressured customers...... Rather than fork out for elaborate marketing, the upstarts enlisted YouTube and Facebook influencers to get the word out.
Andy_Grove  BlackBerry  blindsided  Blockbuster  brands  cost-consciousness  customer_insights  Dollar_Shave_Club  executive_management  GE  Gillette  good_enough  Harry's  industries  industry_boundaries  inflection_points  Intel  irrelevance  KPIs  metrics  millennials  movingonup  myopic  obsolescence  out-of-the-box  P&G  power_generation  retailers  reward_systems  sales_per_square_foot  shifting_tastes  slowly_moving  tradition-bound  warning_signs 
april 2019 by jerryking
7 Closing Strategies to Double Your Average Sale Size
August 11 | Entrepreneur Magazine | Marc Wayshak - GUEST WRITER
Your success depends on closing bigger, better deals. Put your time and energy into prospects with the power to make large investments and introduce you to others who can do the same.

1. Get over your fear.
Many salespeople are simply too scared to sell to huge companies...... large companies face the same problems as your small customers do, just on a bigger scale. This means they need a bigger version of your solution -- and they have the budget to match. Get over your fear.

2. Stand apart from the crowd.
High-level prospects hear from an average of 10 salespeople every day. If you do what everyone else is doing, you’ll never get through to them or earn their trust. To double your average sales size, you must be intentional about standing apart from the crowd in your industry. While others pitch, you should ask questions. While others are enthusiastic, you should be low-key and genuine. While your competitors focus on their products, you should focus on your prospect’s deepest frustrations and show how you can solve them.

3. Stop selling to low-level prospects.
Selling low-level prospects harms your close rate and decreasing your average sale size. Low-level prospects simply don’t have the power or budget to tell you “yes." They’re not the decision-makers. If you want to increase the size of your sales, stop selling to prospects who lack the budget to invest in your solution.

4. Sell to decision-makers.
It’s a best practice to head straight to the top of the food chain and sell to directors, vice presidents, and C-level executives. They have the power and budget to say “yes” to your offer. If someone refers you back down the chain, you’re still landing an introduction to the right person -- by his or her boss, no less.

5. Stop cold-calling.
Cold calls are miserable. Try implementing a sales-prospecting campaign. Plan your calls, letters and emails as follow-ups to a valuable letter or package you send via FedEx. This could be a special report, unique sample or company analysis. These intentional, repeated touches over a series of months will set you up as a familiar name by the time you actually get your prospect on the phone. When a huge sale is on the line, you can afford to invest time and money to catch a single prospect’s attention.

6. Know the decision-making process.
If you’ve closed only small deals at small companies in the past, you might be accustomed to working with just one or two decision-makers at a time. In large corporations, the decision-making process can be much more complicated. One of the biggest mistakes salespeople make is failing to understand the decision-making process. Get a grasp of this early on, and you can stay in front of the right people, build value for them and close your sales at higher prices.

7. Leverage sales for introductions.
When you close one large sale at a big organization, don’t stop there. Ask new customers for introductions to others in their company or network who could benefit from your offering. You have nothing to lose by asking for introductions, but failure to do so will cost you massive opportunity and revenue.
Gulliver_strategies  sales  fear  large_companies  differentiation  sales_cycle  buyer_choice_rejection  cold_calling  referrals  prospects  JCK  executive_management  campaigns  Aimia  LBMA  strategic_thinking  close_rate  questions  thinking_big  enterprise_clients  C-suite  low-key  authenticity  doubling  the_right_people 
august 2017 by jerryking
The Decline of the Baronial C.E.O. - The New York Times
By NELSON D. SCHWARTZJUNE 17, 2017

General Electric is just the latest storied name in corporate America to show its leader the door. Ford’s chief executive, Mark Fields, had been in the job for less than three years when he was fired in late May. Two weeks earlier, Mario Longhi of U.S. Steel abruptly stepped down. With these departures, the American era of the baronial chief executive, sitting atop an industrial dominion with all the attendant privileges, is drawing to a close.....Jeffrey Immelt tried to change G.E., yet couldn’t react quickly enough to the forces affecting companies like his......[(Amazon + Whole Foods) shows how] the digital age has upended the competitive landscape, pitting companies in vastly different industries against one another.

These include the rising power of activist investors, who buy up stakes in companies and then demand changes. Activists are now hunting much bigger game, demanding double-digit annual earnings growth in a stagnant economy. Or else.....Boards, too, have changed, evolving from country-club-like collections of the same familiar faces into a much more diverse and demanding constituency.....for most of the Fortune 500, the unquestioned power and perks, the imperviousness to criticism from the likes of shareholders, and the outsize public profile that once automatically came with the corner office have gone the way of the typewriter and the Dictaphone.....[today] ...wading into bitterly partisan public debates offers little upside for corporate leaders, and risks damage to their company’s reputation.

As a result, while companies in many ways have more economic and political power than ever, “chief executives now shy away from weighing in on the policy level or broader societal issues,” Mr. Sharer said. “They’re more focused on running their companies.”......Mr. Immelt’s exit leaves a void at the intersection of business and public policy,.....“If you start fooling around in Washington with the Business Roundtable or writing op-eds, activist investors will ask what you’re doing,”....[GE] became a natural target for activist investors. One of those was Nelson Peltz, a onetime corporate raider who relied on Michael R. Milken’s junk bonds for financing back in the 1980s.
CEOs  GE  executive_management  shareholder_activism  digital_disruption  Jeffrey_Immelt  disruption  technological_change  decline  Vijay_Govindarajan  boards_&_directors_&_governance 
june 2017 by jerryking
How SurveyMonkey Is Coping After the Death of Dave Goldberg - The New York Times
By QUENTIN HARDY JUNE 21, 2015.

SurveyMonkey’s top executives have had to avoid “strategic paralysis from a culture of mourning, and emotional revolt from telling people ‘get over it,’ ” said Jeffrey A. Sonnenfeld, a professor at the Yale School of Management. “There is a way to take a loss and make it into strength.”

SurveyMonkey was started in 1999 and remained small for a decade, offering online and email surveys on various topics. In 2009, private equity investors acquired it, and Mr. Goldberg, who had sold a small music company to Yahoo for $12 million in 2001, was brought in soon after to run the company. Starting with just 14 employees, Mr. Goldberg began his recruiting.
Quentin_Hardy  SurveyMonkey  Silicon_Valley  mourning  succession  paralyze  boards_&_directors_&_governance  executive_management 
june 2015 by jerryking
Sree Sreenivasan
| Fast Company | Business + Innovation

What is something about your job that you think would surprise people?
Most people are surprised to know that the digital media team at the Met has 70 people in it. Our world-class team works on topics I love: web, digital, social, mobile, video, data, email, gallery interactives, media lab, and so much more. We like to run our team like a 70-person startup inside a 145-year-old company.

People always ask me how I justify the museum spending so many resources of digital media. I would always talk about the importance of connecting the physical and the digital, the in-person and the online (here's a TEDx talk I gave on this topic). But I recently got concrete proof that I've been sharing with anyone who will listen.

The photographer Carleton Watkins shot photos in 1861 of Yosemite that he showed to President Lincoln and inspired him to sign legislation that protected Yosemite forever and started the conservation movement. He did this without ever seeing Yosemite, just the facsimiles. We had an exhibition of these beautiful photos and they make the case better than I can for the value of something artificial (or digital) to inspire support, interest, and more, for something real.
innovation  digital_media  social_media  museums  cyberphysical  New_York_City  executive_management  partnerships  analog  meat_space  Sree_Sreenivasan  digital_strategies  physical_assets  physical_world  Abraham_Lincoln  photography  Yosemite  conservation 
may 2015 by jerryking
Why you need a chief reputation officer - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Jan. 04 2015
reputation  executive_management  Harvey_Schachter 
january 2015 by jerryking
How to make the leap to the VP’s seat - The Globe and Mail
MICHAEL SHERAR
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Dec. 03 2014

Like everything that is worthwhile doing, a promotion to VP requires hard work, lengthy preparation and thoughtfulness. Challenge yourself to view things from a higher perspective starting from how your own work is helping to drive a broader organizational strategy and how it can be leveraged to support other parts of the organization. Take this type of thinking to the interview and then into your new role as a VP and you can help your organization scale new heights.
howto  executive_management  movingonup  leadership  interviews  hard_work  companywide 
december 2014 by jerryking
Korn/Ferry’s CEO: What Boards Want in Executives - WSJ
By LAUREN WEBER
Dec. 9, 2014

Korn/Ferry has been trying to boost its business in talent management, offering recruiting and development tools aimed at professional employees....Korn/Ferry’s slow transition by acquiring leadership-development firms like PDI Ninth House and Global Novations LLC, and converting its bank of knowledge about executive careers into a portfolio of products that organizations can buy or license, from interview guides to software that helps managers identify and cultivate high-potential employees.

Mr. Burnison: For the boardroom or the C-suite, the technical competencies are a starting point. What we’ve seen through our research is that the No. 1 predictor of executive success is learning agility. So we want to get a real line of sight into a person’s thinking style and leadership style. Right now, you’re seeing me how I want you to see me. What you really want to know is “How does Gary make decisions under pressure?”

WSJ: What is learning agility?

Mr. Burnison: It comes down to people’s willingness to grow, to learn, to have insatiable curiosity. Think about the levers of growth that a CEO has. You can consolidate, or tap [new markets], or innovate. When it comes down to the last two, particularly innovation, you want a workforce that is incredibly curious.
Korn_Ferry  executive_search  boards_&_directors_&_governance  CEOs  talent_management  turnover  executive_management  learning_agility  adaptability  C-suite 
december 2014 by jerryking
Wall Street a target for Twitter’s headhunters - The Globe and Mail
ROBERT CYRAN
Wall Street a target for Twitter’s headhunters Add to ...
SUBSCRIBERS ONLY
NEW YORK — Reuters
Published Tuesday, Jul. 01 2014
executive_search  executive_management  Wall_Street  Twitter 
july 2014 by jerryking
Forget the CV, data decide careers - FT.com
July 9, 2014 | FT |By Tim Smedley.

The human touch of job interviews is under threat from technology, writes Tim Smedley, but can new techniques be applied to top-level recruitment?

I no longer look at somebody's CV to determine if we will interview them or not," declares Teri Morse, who oversees the recruitment of 30,000 people each year at Xerox Services. Instead, her team analyses personal data to determine the fate of job candidates.

She is not alone. "Big data" and complex algorithms are increasingly taking decisions out of the hands of individual interviewers - a trend that has far-reaching consequences for job seekers and recruiters alike.

The company whose name has become a synonym for photocopy has turned into one that helps others outsource everyday business processes, from accounting to human resources. It recently teamed up with Evolv, which uses data sets of past behaviour to predict everything from salesmanship to loyalty.

For Xerox this means putting prospective candidates for the company's 55,000 call-centre positions through a screening test that covers a wide range of questions. Evolv then lays separate data it has mined on what causes employees to leave their call-centre jobs over the candidates' responses to predict which of them will stick around and which will further exacerbate the already high churn rate call centres tend to suffer.

The results are surprising. Some are quirky: employees who are members of one or two social networks were found to stay in their job for longer than those who belonged to four or more social networks (Xerox recruitment drives at gaming conventions were subsequently cancelled). Some findings, however, were much more fundamental: prior work experience in a similar role was not found to be a predictor of success.

"It actually opens up doors for people who would never have gotten to interview based on their CV," says Ms Morse. Some managers initially questioned why new recruits were appearing without any prior relevant experience. As time went on, attrition rates in some call centres fell by 20 per cent and managers no longer quibbled. "I don't know why this works," admits Ms Morse, "I just know it works."

Organisations have long held large amounts of data. From financial accounts to staff time sheets, the movement from paper to computer made it easier to understand and analyse. As computing power increased exponentially, so did data storage. The floppy disk of the 1990s could store barely more than one megabyte of data; today a 16 gigabyte USB flash drive costs less than a fiver ($8).

It is simple, then, to see how recruiters arrive at a point where crunching data could replace the human touch of job interviews. Research by NewVantage Partners, the technology consultants, found that 85 per cent of Fortune 1000 executives in 2013 had a big data initiative planned or in progress, with almost half using big data operationally.

HR services provider Ceridian is one of many companies hoping to tap into the potential of big data for employers. "From an HR and recruitment perspective, big data enables you to analyse volumes of data that in the past were hard to access and understand," explains David Woodward, chief product and innovation officer at Ceridian UK.

This includes "applying the data you hold about your employees and how they've performed, to see the causal links between the characteristics of the hire that you took in versus those that stayed with you and became successful employees. Drawing those links can better inform your decisions in the hiring process."

Data sets need not rely on internal data, however. The greatest source of big data is the internet, which is easy for both FTSE 100 and smaller companies to access.

"Social media data now gives us the ability to 'listen' to the business," says Zahir Ladhani, vice-president at IBM Smarter Workforce. "You can look at what customers are saying about your business, what employees are saying, and what you yourself are saying - cull all that data together and you can understand the impact.

"Most recruitment organisations now use social media and job-site data," says Mr Ladhani. "We looked at an organisation which had very specialised, very hard to find skill sets. When we analysed the data of the top performers in that job family, we found out that they all hung out at a very unique, niche social media site. Once we tapped into that database, boom!"

Ceridian, too, has worked with companies to "effectively scan the internet to see what jobs are being posted through the various job boards, in what parts of the country," says Mr Woodward. "If you're looking to open a particular facility in a part of the country, for example, you'll be able to see whether there's already a high demand for particular types of skills."

Experts appear split on whether the specialisation required for executive recruitment lends itself to big data.

"I hire 30,000 call-centre people on an annual basis - we don't hire that many executives," says Ms Morse, adding "there's not enough volume". However Mr Ladhani disagrees, believing that over time the data set an organisation holds on senior management hires would become statistically valid.

As more companies start to analyse their employee data to make hiring decisions, could recruitment finally become more of a science than an art?

"The potential is clearly much greater now than ever before to crunch very large volumes of data and draw conclusions from that which can make better decisions," says Mr Woodward. "The methods and computing power being used in weather forecasting 10 years ago are now available to us all . . . who knows where this may go."

It is a trend worth considering - to get your next job, perfecting your CV could well be less important than having carefully considered the footprint you leave in cyberspace.

Case study Demographic drilling-down helps LV=recast recruitment ads

Kevin Hough, head of recruiting at insurance firm LV=, was a pioneer of big data before he had heard the term.

A year ago, the question of where best to target the firm's recruitment advertising provided an innovative answer. LV= looked up the postcodes at which its current staff lived and organised the findings by the employee's level of seniority, explains Mr Hough. "Using software called Geo-Maps, which works similarly to Google Maps, we could zoom in and out of clusters of our people to see where they are willing to travel from to get to work."

Next, the insurer looked at the locations from which candidates were applying and compared those with the postcodes of current staff. It also looked at the locations and interests of its followers on social media sites, such as Facebook and LinkedIn. The analysis included their interests, stated sexual orientation, ethnicity and gender.

This allowed the firm to create a profile of its typical, successful candidate, also taking into consideration their age and location.

"What was really interesting was the reach some of our advertising was having and, more importantly, some of the gaps," Mr Hough says.

The analysis, which took little investment or expertise, has allowed LV= to redesign its recruitment advertising.

"Sometimes, with all the clever systems that people have in organisations, you can be blinded to the simple, raw data that is there," says Mr Hough.

Next, LV= will add performance review data, taking the analysis to a higher level. He explains that this piece of work will ask who of the group recruited a year before is still there.

"It will help shape not only how we attract people, but will even start to shape some of the roles themselves," he says.

Tim Smedley

By Tim Smedley
analytics  call_centres  Ceridian  data  data_driven  data_storage  Evolv  executive_management  FTSE_100  hard_to_find  hiring  internal_data  job_boards  Managing_Your_Career  massive_data_sets  personal_data  predictive_analytics  recruiting  résumés  small_business  social_media  unstructured_data  Xerox 
july 2014 by jerryking
4 Common Traits of the Best Chief Operating Officers
APRIL 4, 2014 | | Entrepreneur.com | Ryan Caldbeck.

1. They are strategic with a focus on details.
2. They appreciate talent.
3. They have no ego:
4. They are data driven:
COO  executive_management  ksfs  data_driven  humility  strategic_thinking  detail_oriented  best_of 
july 2014 by jerryking
The COO—An Enigma to Many | Venture Philanthropy Partners
When contemplating the COO role, it’s important to focus on substance over form. Specifically, the title of COO (the form) is much less important than an organization coming to grips with its need for effective operational management—that is, the management capacity (people, systems, and know-how) that allows an organization to ensure that its “trains run on time” (the substance). And, the colloquialism of the “trains running on time” means that things run effectively and efficiently, within budget, and with the information to know in a timely manner when they are (or aren’t) doing so.

But, an important caveat for good operational management comes from a favorite Druckerism: “It is more important to do the right thing, than to do things right.” I’d prefer a nonprofit producing meaningful, lasting outcomes for children and families that is an operational disaster to one that is “well-managed”, but having only incremental benefit in helping those they serve.

Effective operations must yield improved results. In business, this is measured in profits, market share, low employee turnover, and satisfied clients.... operational effectiveness? Well-written job descriptions, elaborate policies and procedures, human resource management guidelines and handbooks, expensive software systems, and a score of other things, in all honesty, have little to do with it. These are merely symbols, not the essence of good operations. If you have a clear vision of your work that is commonly shared, if people know what to do, if they care deeply and are well-trained and equipped for their work, if they feel respected and heard, if there is good internal communication, if programs are of high quality, if leaders demonstrate a continual need for the organization and those in it to improve, and if you establish a rigor and integrity in how all of this is managed by using timely, factual information and managerial common sense—then you can have “good operations.”
COO  executive_management  operations  Peter_Drucker  on-time 
july 2014 by jerryking
Google Releases Employee Data, Illustrating Tech's Diversity Challenge
MAY 28, 2014 | - NYTimes.com | By CLAIRE CAIN MILLER.

Silicon Valley remains a white man’s world.

Thirty percent of Google’s 46,170 employees worldwide are women, the company said, and 17 percent of its technical employees are women. Comparatively, 47 percent of the total workforce in the United States is women and 20 percent of software developers are women, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Of its United States employees, 61 percent are white, 2 percent are black and 3 percent are Hispanic. About one-third are Asian — well above the national average — and 4 percent are of two or more races. Of Google’s technical staff, 60 percent are white, 1 percent are black, 2 percent are Hispanic, 34 percent are Asian and 3 percent are of two or more races.

In the United States workforce over all, 80 percent of employees are white, 12 percent are black and 5 percent are Asian, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics....“Google is not where we want to be when it comes to diversity, and it’s hard to address these kinds of challenges if you’re not prepared to discuss them openly, and with the facts,” Laszlo Block, Google’s senior vice president for people operations, wrote in a blog post....Tech companies have often blamed the lack of diverse workforces on the pipeline — they can only hire the people who apply for jobs, and those tend to be white and Asian men, they say..
executive_management  Google  Claire_Cain_Miller  talent_pipelines  Silicon_Valley  African-Americans  women  diversity  Laszlo_Bock 
may 2014 by jerryking
What executives should know about open data
anuary 2014 | McKinsey & Company | by Michael Chui, James Manyika, and Steve Van Kuiken.
open_data  McKinsey  executive_management  data  MyData 
january 2014 by jerryking
Executive search firm rebuilds after staff defections - The Globe and Mail
RICHARD BLACKWELL

The Globe and Mail

Published Thursday, Jan. 09 2014

The shift to specialization in the executive-search business has partly been spurred by social media, Mr. Lovas said. Using sites such as LinkedIn, it is easy for anyone to come up with a list of chief financial officers, for example, but only a recruiter with a specialization in CFOs will have the knowledge and relationships necessary to determine who is truly qualified for a position and get them to consider a job change.

Another major shift in the head-hunting business, he said, is the increasing need to find interim managers to run a client company until a permanent employee can be found.

Indeed, the “interim management” business could be a bigger business than the basic executive search business within a decade, Mr. Lovas said. “It is one of the great trends in recruiting going forward.”
executive_search  professional_service_firms  relationships  LinkedIn  CFOs  interim  executive_management  defections 
january 2014 by jerryking
Four Executives on Succeeding in Business as a Woman - NYTimes.com
October 12, 2013 | NYT | By ADAM BRYANT.

You need to spend political capital — be unafraid to introduce people, compliment somebody when it’s deserved and stand up for something you really believe in, rather than just go with the flow. I don’t mean being a perennial troublemaker, but it’s about having conviction and courage. Spend that political capital you earn by being intellectually credible, by being a fighter for the people on your team when appropriate, and by arguing for principles that matter. Those are qualities that give you credit. If you’re waiting for the perfect moment to spend that capital, you’re going to be sidelined your whole career waiting to just kind of enter the ring.

Women can and should do a better job of helping one another to be in that transactional forum, and to get over the anxiety that we’re going to be found wanting on the wrong side of that equation. We’re undervaluing the role that we can play in the success of other people and the organization. So don’t be afraid to spend some of that political capital. You have to be well prepared, you have to be smart, you have to be on time, you have to be responsive, you have to be respectful, you have to have principles. But once you have all those things and you’ve built a track record, don’t wait for the perfect day.
women  CEOs  movingonup  lessons_learned  gender_gap  executive_management  leaders  leadership  political_capital  principles  courage  convictions  punctuality  transactions  transactional_relationships  troublemakers  responsiveness  on-time 
october 2013 by jerryking
For Twitter, Success Came After Founders' Exit - WSJ.com
October 3, 2013 | WSJ | By SHIRA OVIDE and YOREE KOH.

For Twitter, Success Came After Founders' Exit
Ailing Startup Finds Its Legs After Pushing Aside Those That Brought It to Life
Twitter  start_ups  CEOs  executive_management  exits 
october 2013 by jerryking
Shakeups in the "C Suite": Hail to the New Chiefs
July-August 2012 | World Future Society Vol. 46, No. 4 |By Geoffrey Colon.

Here are a few more additions to the “C Suite” that we might anticipate as technological and economic trends shape the corporate future.

* Earned Media Officer
* Chief Content Officer
* Open-Source Manager
* Chief Linguist
* Chief Data Scientist
executive_management  CMOs  data_scientists 
july 2013 by jerryking
Working Well With Executive Recruiters - WSJ.com
May 4, 2008 | WSJ | By SARAH E. NEEDLEMAN.

Be Sure
Be Specific
Provide references
Ask smart questions
Explain rejections
Stay involved
Suggest moving on
Sarah_E._Needleman  recruiting  executive_management  executive_search  Korn_Ferry 
february 2013 by jerryking
Bosses, Get Better at Big Data - At Work - WSJ
October 19, 2012 |WSJ | by Javier Espinoza. (share with Birju Patel for CBC).

Firms need to do more to exploit it....CEOs need to better identify ways data can help businesses gain more insight into their customers or operations.

“The struggle has always been how companies can harness information,” he says. “Senior managers are moving the discussion from managing data to one around how can we actually exploit data. That’s quite a significant shift.”
* Share responsibility for what IT departments can deliver.
* Set up a data lab.
* Break down the silo mentality.
executive_management  massive_data_sets  organizing_data  silo_mentality 
january 2013 by jerryking
Tips for executive contracts
?? | Globe & Mail | Malcolm J. MacKillop

* Responsibilities & performance
* Benefits
* Perks
* Golden parachutes
* Golden handcuffs
* Arbitration clauses
*
contracts  employment_law  tips  executive_management  law  legalese 
december 2012 by jerryking
Quick-Change Artists May Find Fast Route to Executive Positions
May. 9, 1995 | WSJ | HAL LANCASTER

HERE'S A HOT career tip for the truly ambitious: Be a change agent.

Change agents, i.e. corporate alchemists who can reinvent a company's culture and operations, are the Holy Grail of executive searches these days....with so many companies looking for new brooms to sweep away their cobwebs, every manager or consultant on the prowl for bigger responsibilities wants to be one. But job seekers beware, because these positions _ which can range from unit heads to CEOs _ can be booby traps. CEOs love the idea of change, but the actual practice can be a blow to their egos.

Recruiter Dennis Krieger tells of the executive brought in to revamp the financial department of an industrial distributor. Four months later, the CEO wanted to fire him for being ``too aggressive and upsetting too many people,'' Mr. Krieger says. The CEO reconsidered after conceding the executive had met his goals.

``They say they want you to question everything, but they don't really want that,'' says Terry Gallagher, executive vice president of Battalia Winston in New York...a wise change agent often is more of a prod than a broom. ``A real change agent isn't someone who's going to make a lot of changes,'' Mr. Herz says. They're diplomats and motivators who will ``change the mood'' so those around them can make changes....investigate before accepting a job. A conservative approach, says executive recruiter Rex T. Olsen of Enterchange Executive Horizons, is to look for a company where change has already begun. ``Management may say it wants change, but if nothing is going on, how can you tell?''
executive_management  movingonup  change  Hal_Lancaster  Managing_Your_Career  organizational_change  organizational_culture  organizational_design  change_agents  managing_change  executive_search 
december 2012 by jerryking
When a Recruiter Comes Knocking, Be Ready to Respond - WSJ.com
August 6, 1996 | WSJ |By PERRI CAPELL.
* Always take the call. If you don't cooperate, chances are you won't be contacted by the firm again.
*Find out more about the firm. Although there is some blurring of the lines, search firms usually are divided into two types -- retained and contingency -- and it helps to know the difference. Retained firms such as Korn/Ferry, the world's largest in terms of revenue, and Heidrick & Struggles in Chicago are paid to conduct a search, even if no one is ultimately hired. Contingency firms, such as Management Recruiters International, Cleveland, and Robert Half International , RHI -0.34% Menlo Park, Calif., getpaid only if their candidate is placed.
*READ BETWEEN the lines. During your first conversation, you won't be given the name of the hiring company, just a brief description of the opening and its requirements. The recruiter will then ask if you know anyone suitable for the job. Be equally discreet in return.
* Be articulate and positive. The fact that you've been called means you have the right background for an opening. Don't assume you're just chatting; the search firm will be evaluating whether you have the communication skills and other "intangibles" needed for the job.

* Don't exaggerate. When asked about your accomplishments or earnings, don't embellish.
executive_search  executive_management  Managing_Your_Career  preparation  readiness 
december 2012 by jerryking
How to Stay Hired
March 1995 | Report on Business Magazine | Trevor Cole. Article explores the roles of communication and office culture in determining how long a new executive lasts in his job.
Rogers  organizational_culture  Managing_Your_Career  managing_up  Communicating_&_Connecting  listening  first90days  executive_management 
december 2012 by jerryking
Making the Change From Middle Manager To a Seat at the Top - WSJ.com
July 7, 1998 | WSJ | By HAL LANCASTER

Less surprising, delivering results matters. Thinking strategically, being persuasive, being politically adroit and having a "significantly broader organizational awareness" also tend to make up a successful manager, ...Earn respect for being exceptionally good at what you do and show that you can run a business independently. Translation: Deliver results without a lot of hand-holding....a seldom-mentioned trait: consistency. "They must show consistency in the decisions they make and in their behavior," ..."A lot of people fail to make the next move because they really don't understand" how to assess risk," she says. "Or they don't have a Plan B."
Hal_Lancaster  ksfs  Managing_Your_Career  movingonup  executive_management  risk-assessment  risk-management  contingency_planning  JCK  transitions  companywide  middle_management  consistency  decision_making  Plan_B  off-plan  hand-holding  strategic_thinking  personal_accomplishments 
december 2012 by jerryking
In this case, you don't want to recycle
December 25, 1997 | Chicago Tribune | By Carol Kleiman.

To avoid rapid "recycling," according to Baiocchi:

1. Don't accept a position if you don't know who your boss will be.

2. Recognize that cultural and personality fit are as important as a business fit.

3. Don't be rushed into accepting a job.

4. Make sure you get direct answers to important questions.

5. Don't take an interim position if you're qualified for the next higher slot.

6. Get your employment agreement in writing.

"Success is getting what you want," said Baiocchi. "Happiness is wanting what you get."
Managing_Your_Career  lessons_learned  executive_management  outplacement 
december 2012 by jerryking
Growth Hacker is the new VP Marketing | @andrewchen
The rise of the Growth Hacker
The new job title of “Growth Hacker” is integrating itself into Silicon Valley’s culture, emphasizing that coding and technical chops are now an essential part of being a great marketer. Growth hackers are a hybrid of marketer and coder, one who looks at the traditional question of “How do I get customers for my product?” and answers with A/B tests, landing pages, viral factor, email deliverability, and Open Graph. On top of this, they layer the discipline of direct marketing, with its emphasis on quantitative measurement, scenario modeling via spreadsheets, and a lot of database queries. If a startup is pre-product/market fit, growth hackers can make sure virality is embedded at the core of a product. After product/market fit, they can help run up the score on what’s already working.

This isn’t just a single role – the entire marketing team is being disrupted. Rather than a VP of Marketing with a bunch of non-technical marketers reporting to them, instead growth hackers are engineers leading teams of engineers. The process of integrating and optimizing your product to a big platform requires a blurring of lines between marketing, product, and engineering, so that they work together to make the product market itself. Projects like email deliverability, page-load times, and Facebook sign-in are no longer technical or design decisions – instead they are offensive weapons to win in the market.

The stakes are huge because of “superplatforms” giving access to 100M+ consumers
These skills are invaluable and can change the trajectory of a new product. For the first time ever, it’s possible for new products to go from zero to 10s of millions users in just a few years. Great examples include Pinterest, Zynga, Groupon, Instagram, Dropbox. New products with incredible traction emerge every week. These products, with millions of users, are built on top of new, open platforms that in turn have hundreds of millions of users – Facebook and Apple in particular. Whereas the web in 1995 consisted of a mere 16 million users on dialup, today over 2 billion people access the internet. On top of these unprecedented numbers, consumers use super-viral communication platforms that rapidly speed up the proliferation of new products – not only is the market bigger, but it moves faster too.

Before this era, the discipline of marketing relied on the only communication channels that could reach 10s of millions of people – newspaper, TV, conferences, and channels like retail stores. To talk to these communication channels, you used people – advertising agencies, PR, keynote speeches, and business development. Today, the traditional communication channels are fragmented and passe. The fastest way to spread your product is by distributing it on a platform using APIs, not MBAs. Business development is now API-centric, not people-centric.

Whereas PR and press used to be the drivers of customer acquisition, instead it’s now a lagging indicator that your Facebook integration is working. The role of the VP of Marketing, long thought to be a non-technical role, is rapidly fading and in its place, a new breed of marketer/coder hybrids have emerged.
growth  marketing  hacks  blogs  Silicon_Valley  executive_management  virality  experimentation  trial_&_error  coding  platforms  executive_search  CMOs  measurements  growth_hacking  APIs  new_products  lagging_indicators  offensive_tactics 
december 2012 by jerryking
Why Does Google Crave Elites for Their Management Team While Apple Eschews Them? - Forbes
Eric Jackson, Contributor

I cover the business of technology
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11/27/2012
Google  Apple  talent_management  executive_management  talent 
november 2012 by jerryking
Making Sense of Ambiguous Evidence
September 2008 | HBR | A Conversation with Documentary Filmmaker Errol Morris.

The information that top managers receive is rarely unfiltered. Unpopular opinions are censored. Partisan views are veiled as objective arguments. Honest mistakes are made. The manager is then left to sort it all out and come to a wise conclusion.

Few people know how to get an accurate read on a situation like documentarian Errol Morris. He is the award-winning director of such films as The Thin Blue Line and this year’s Standard Operating Procedure, an exploration of the elusive truth behind the infamous photographs taken at Abu Ghraib prison. The Guardian has ranked him among the world’s top 10 directors, crediting him with “a forensic mind” and “a painter’s eye.”

In this article, Morris talks with HBR’s Lisa Burrell about how he sorts through ambiguous evidence and contradictory views to arrive at the real story. “I don’t believe in the postmodern notion that there are different kinds of truth,” he says. “There is one objective reality, period.” Getting to it requires keeping your mind open to all kinds of evidence—not just the parts that fit with your first impressions or developing opinions—and, often, far more investigation than one would think.

If finding the truth is a matter of perseverance, convincing people of it is something of an art, one with which Morris has had much experience not only as a documentarian but also as a highly sought-after director of TV ads for companies like Apple, Citibank, Adidas, and Toyota. He holds up John Kerry’s 2004 bid for the U.S. presidency as a cautionary tale: Kerry struck voters as inauthentic when he emphasized only his military service and failed to account for his subsequent war protest. Morris would have liked to interview him speaking in his own words—natural, unscripted material—so that his humanity, which seemed to get lost in the campaign, could emerge.
anecdotal  HBR  executive_management  CEOs  contradictions  information  information_flows  evidence_based  objective_reality  information_gaps  authenticity  sense-making  ambiguities  uncertainty  persuasion  forensics  postmodern  filmmakers  documentaries  judgment  cautionary_tales 
august 2012 by jerryking
What Makes a Top Executive?
1983 | Psychology Today | by Morgan W.McCall, Jr. and Michael M. Lombardo.
Executives, like the rest of us, are a patchwork of strengths and weaknesses....The fatal flaws of executives who failed to live up to their potential.

1. Insensitive to others: abrasive, intimidating style.
2. Cold, aloof, arrogant
3. Betrayal of Trust—failure to meet commitments.
4. Overly ambitious—plays politics, pushes too hard to get ahead.
5. Failure to handle specific performance problems—failure to handle problems then not admit the problem, try to cover up or shift blame.
6. Overmanaging: unable to delegate or build a team.
7. Unable to select and develop an effective staff.
8. Unable to think broadly or strategically—too much attention to detail and minor technical problems.
9. Unable to adapt to a boss with a different style.
10. Overdependence on one’s boss or mentor.

These flaws matter because:
1. Strengths become weaknesses
2. Deficiencies eventually matter
3. Success goes to their heads
4. Events conspire

Part of handling adversity lies in knowing what not to do. Know which behavioural patterns will colleagues and superiors consider intolerable...Seek diversity in the forms of success.
career_ending_moves  CEOs  character_traits  EQ  executive_management  leadership  leadership_development  listening  managing_people  Managing_Your_Career  movingonup  Myers-Briggs  overdependence  people_skills  personality_types/traits  strengths  weaknesses 
july 2012 by jerryking
Women, Welch Clash at Forum
May 4, 2012 | WSJ | By JOHN BUSSEY.

He had this advice for women who want to get ahead: Grab tough assignments to prove yourself, get line experience, and embrace serious performance reviews and the coaching inherent in them.

"Without a rigorous appraisal system, without you knowing where you stand...and how you can improve, none of these 'help' programs that were up there are going to be worth much to you," he said. Mr. Welch said later that the appraisal "is the best way to attack bias" because the facts go into the document, which both parties have to sign.
Jack_Welch  GE  work_life_balance  rigour  gender_gap  movingonup  executive_management  performance  performance_reviews 
may 2012 by jerryking
Olaf Olafsson, ‘Restoration’ Author and Time Warner Manager - NYTimes.com
March 5, 2012 | NYT | By DAVID CARR.

Profiles Olaf Olafsson, executive vice president for international and corporate strategy at Time Warner who has also written four books in the past 12 years. His work is characterized by meticulous attention to place and historical events....Born in Reykjavik and the son of a novelist, Mr. Olafsson came to the United States to study at Brandeis University in Massachusetts, graduating with a degree in physics. He eventually ended up working at Sony, where he founded Sony Interactive Entertainment in 1991 and led the rollout of the Sony PlayStation in the United States and Europe. At Time Warner he is a strategic adviser on digital and international matters and oversees a $500 million investment fund for new ventures...“Restoration” is an ambitious historical novel, “Absolution,” “The Journey Home” and “Walking into Night”
writers  David_Carr  Iceland  rollouts  executive_management  novels  books  historical_fiction  physicists 
march 2012 by jerryking
Apple Hires Dixons Chief to Run Retail Stores - Jessica E. Vascellaro - News - AllThingsD
Jessica E. Vascellaro, Reporter, The Wall Street Journal

Apple Hires Dixons Chief to Run Retail Stores

January 31, 2012
Apple  retailers  Jessica_E._Vascellaro  executive_management  hiring 
march 2012 by jerryking
The High Cost of the Gender Gap - WSJ.com
NOVEMBER 21, 2011 | WSJ | By REBECCA BLUMENSTEIN.

The High Cost of the Gender Gap
Dominic Barton, Geena Davis and Debra Lee on why CEOs need to focus more on women.
By REBECCA BLUMENSTEIN
Viacom  BET  McKinsey  actors  gender_gap  Dominic_Barton  CEOs  women  executive_management  high-cost 
december 2011 by jerryking
Executives Looking to Get Ahead Should Get to Know the Board - WSJ.com
OCTOBER 16, 2011 |WSJ| By JOANN S. LUBLIN
High Aspirations? Get to Know the Board

MGM Resorts International promoted senior executive Corey Sanders three times between 2005 and 2009 to high-level management posts. But in order to move up further, he needed to improve his boardroom presentations because he sometimes lost directors' attention, Chief Executive Jim Murren told him two years ago.

So in December 2009, the hotel and casino operator brought in a speech coach for Mr. Sanders. The all-day session included videotaping one of his prior presentations.

"You could see I wasn't relaxed," Mr. Sanders remembers. "I wasn't using my hands and that made me look stiff." As a result, "I didn't sound confident." Mr. Murren then had him informally train with a colleague. They worked together before, during and after board meetings for six months.

Mr. Sanders, who advanced to chief operating officer late last year, "now communicates complex information effectively to the board without reading from a script," Mr. Murren reports. Meanwhile, Mr. Sanders is reaching out to MGM directors "so they get to know me."
movingonup  public_speaking  Communicating_&_Connecting  boards_&_directors_&_governance  executive_management  Joann_S._Lublin 
november 2011 by jerryking
Breaking your own glass ceiling - The Globe and Mail
LEAH EICHLER | Columnist profile
From Saturday's Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Sep. 16, 2011
women  glass_ceilings  movingonup  executive_management 
september 2011 by jerryking
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