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What’s Next for Comey? Probably Not ‘a Normal Job’ - The New York Times
By MATTHEW GOLDSTEIN and ALEXANDRA STEVENSON MAY 13, 2017

Few can boast of a résumé like James B. Comey’s: top federal prosecutor, chief lawyer for both the world’s largest defense contractor and the world’s biggest hedge fund, and most recently director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

There’s just one problem: He was fired by President Trump, who has called him a “showboat” and a “grandstander.”

So where does Mr. Comey go next?...If Mr. Comey writes a book, he will not be the first F.B.I. director to do so. [Louis Freeh did 8 yrs ago]
......Mr. Comey might not be a candidate to lobby the current administration, his experience with financial crime and cybersecurity would appeal to most Wall Street firms and corporations, recruitment executives said.....“He is so high profile now that just a normal job is way beneath him,” said Jason Wachtel, a managing partner at JW Michaels & Company, a recruitment firm that specializes in placing lawyers at hedge funds and private equity firms. “Most of the hedge funds aren’t going to be big enough for him.”....A big law firm is another possibility.....Most law firms would see Mr. Comey as a big get, said Allan Ripp, a public relations consultant for law firms.

“From a sheer branding perspective, he would be a great hire — even if you bring him in as a counsel and not a partner,” .......In the near term, teaching is also an option. Mr. Comey briefly held a senior research post at Columbia Law School after leaving Bridgewater in January 2013.

Daniel C. Richman, a Columbia law professor and friend of Mr. Comey’s, who helped woo him to Columbia in 2013, said the former F.B.I. director “would be welcomed back, and he knows it.”
FBI  career_paths  executive_search  James_Comey  firings  financial_crimes  cyber_security 
may 2017 by jerryking
No Canadians need apply: the worrying trend in arts hiring - The Globe and Mail
KATE TAYLOR
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Aug. 05, 2016

What is worrying is the pattern: It suggests that Canadian cultural institutions are not nurturing their own talents.

If Canadian curators cannot aspire to eventually manage the museums where they work, or Canadian stage directors need never consider running Canada’s festivals, they will not give their institutions the best of themselves. They will either slump into the self-fulfilling prophecy of lower expectations or they will go abroad.

Of course, museum and festival management is, like many a business, an increasingly global game and these things do go through cycles – Anderson was rapidly replaced by one of his Canadian curators, Matthew Teitelbaum, a Torontonian who ran the AGO for 17 years before moving to the helm of the Boston Museum of Fine Arts last year.

But the recent trend suggests that the boards of large Canadian institutions need to band together to discuss how they can better mentor and nurture potential leaders.

Perhaps they should also take a careful look at the assumptions they are making in their hiring processes. These big appointments are often trumpeted with announcements that stress the long, complicated and, most of all, international searches that have been undertaken to find candidates. That may actually be part of the problem: the increasing use of headhunters to fill these jobs. Executive-recruitment agencies charging large fees to conduct searches deep into the United States or over to Europe are unlikely to conclude that the best person for the job is sitting down the hall or across the street from the incumbent.
cultural_institutions  CEOs  hiring  glass_ceilings  Canadian  museums  galleries  arts  festivals  boards_&_directors_&_governance  home_grown  mentoring  institutional_memory  executive_search  succession  leadership  curators 
august 2016 by jerryking
Recruiting has changed – and so should you - The Globe and Mail
LEAH EICHLER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jan. 23 2015

how then, should job seekers manage their social media presence?

The two recommend a tasteful profile that clearly communicates a candidate’s history. A judiciously worded profile, they say, is more likely to get a stamp of approval from recruiters than one than one that goes overboard in listing professional feats and accomplishments.

Once a recruiter can check off the required skills and experience for a job description, that’s when questions of personality and relationship with the hiring organization come into play. It is this crucial attention to the soft skills that differentiates some executive search firms from those merely engaged in their own online search.
Leah_Eichler  recruiting  LinkedIn  executive_search  personal_branding  JCK  Managing_Your_Career 
january 2015 by jerryking
Korn/Ferry’s CEO: What Boards Want in Executives - WSJ
By LAUREN WEBER
Dec. 9, 2014

Korn/Ferry has been trying to boost its business in talent management, offering recruiting and development tools aimed at professional employees....Korn/Ferry’s slow transition by acquiring leadership-development firms like PDI Ninth House and Global Novations LLC, and converting its bank of knowledge about executive careers into a portfolio of products that organizations can buy or license, from interview guides to software that helps managers identify and cultivate high-potential employees.

Mr. Burnison: For the boardroom or the C-suite, the technical competencies are a starting point. What we’ve seen through our research is that the No. 1 predictor of executive success is learning agility. So we want to get a real line of sight into a person’s thinking style and leadership style. Right now, you’re seeing me how I want you to see me. What you really want to know is “How does Gary make decisions under pressure?”

WSJ: What is learning agility?

Mr. Burnison: It comes down to people’s willingness to grow, to learn, to have insatiable curiosity. Think about the levers of growth that a CEO has. You can consolidate, or tap [new markets], or innovate. When it comes down to the last two, particularly innovation, you want a workforce that is incredibly curious.
Korn_Ferry  executive_search  boards_&_directors_&_governance  CEOs  talent_management  turnover  executive_management  learning_agility  adaptability  C-suite 
december 2014 by jerryking
Wall Street a target for Twitter’s headhunters - The Globe and Mail
ROBERT CYRAN
Wall Street a target for Twitter’s headhunters Add to ...
SUBSCRIBERS ONLY
NEW YORK — Reuters
Published Tuesday, Jul. 01 2014
executive_search  executive_management  Wall_Street  Twitter 
july 2014 by jerryking
Getting Started in ‘Big Data’ - The CFO Report - WSJ
February 4, 2014 | WSJ |by JAMES WILLHITE.

executives and recruiters, who compete for talent in the nascent specialty, point to hiring strategies that can get a big-data operation off the ground. They say they look for specific industry experience, poach from data-rich rivals, rely on interview questions that screen out weaker candidates and recommend starting with small projects.

David Ginsberg, chief data scientist at business-software maker SAP AG , said communication skills are critically important in the field, and that a key player on his big-data team is a “guy who can translate Ph.D. to English. Those are the hardest people to find.”

Along with the ability to explain their findings, data scientists need to have a proven record of being able to pluck useful information from data that often lack an obvious structure and may even come from a dubious source. This expertise doesn’t always cut across industry lines. A scientist with a keen knowledge of the entertainment industry, for example, won’t necessarily be able to transfer his skills to the fast-food market.

Some candidates can make the leap. Wolters Kluwer NV, a Netherlands-based information-services provider, has had some success in filling big-data jobs by recruiting from other, data-rich industries, such as financial services. “We have found tremendous success with going to alternative sources and looking at different businesses and saying, ‘What can you bring into our business?’ ” said Kevin Entricken, the company’s chief financial officer.
massive_data_sets  analytics  data_scientists  cross-industry  recruiting  howto  poaching  plain_English  connecting_the_dots  storytelling  SAP  Wolters_Kluwer  expertise  Communicating_&_Connecting  unstructured_data  war_for_talent  talent  PhDs  executive_search  artificial_intelligence  nontraditional 
june 2014 by jerryking
Executive search firm rebuilds after staff defections - The Globe and Mail
RICHARD BLACKWELL

The Globe and Mail

Published Thursday, Jan. 09 2014

The shift to specialization in the executive-search business has partly been spurred by social media, Mr. Lovas said. Using sites such as LinkedIn, it is easy for anyone to come up with a list of chief financial officers, for example, but only a recruiter with a specialization in CFOs will have the knowledge and relationships necessary to determine who is truly qualified for a position and get them to consider a job change.

Another major shift in the head-hunting business, he said, is the increasing need to find interim managers to run a client company until a permanent employee can be found.

Indeed, the “interim management” business could be a bigger business than the basic executive search business within a decade, Mr. Lovas said. “It is one of the great trends in recruiting going forward.”
executive_search  professional_service_firms  relationships  LinkedIn  CFOs  interim  executive_management  defections 
january 2014 by jerryking
Rosario María Astuvilca - The Globe and Mail
Appointment notice
Rosario María Astuvilca

Content by: Odgers Berndtson

Published Wednesday, Oct. 09 2013
appointments  women  mining  executive_search  Latinos  Hispanic_Americans 
november 2013 by jerryking
The headhunter’s role in the digital age - The Globe and Mail
RENEE SYLVESTRE-WILLIAMS

Special to The Globe and Mail

Published Thursday, Jun. 13 2013

headhunters can find and assess candidates to find the perfect person for a particular job. This saves companies a lot of time, she adds, making it worth their while to pay for a headhunter’s services.

“We identify the talent pool for that specific [job] requirement,” Ms. Pastor explains. “We want to find people who don’t contact us. LinkedIn is one tool and there is a small per cent of talented people there because not everyone is on it.”
executive_search  headhunters  LinkedIn  talent  human_resources  leadership  human_capital  talent_management  talent_pools 
june 2013 by jerryking
Working Well With Executive Recruiters - WSJ.com
May 4, 2008 | WSJ | By SARAH E. NEEDLEMAN.

Be Sure
Be Specific
Provide references
Ask smart questions
Explain rejections
Stay involved
Suggest moving on
Sarah_E._Needleman  recruiting  executive_management  executive_search  Korn_Ferry 
february 2013 by jerryking
Quick-Change Artists May Find Fast Route to Executive Positions
May. 9, 1995 | WSJ | HAL LANCASTER

HERE'S A HOT career tip for the truly ambitious: Be a change agent.

Change agents, i.e. corporate alchemists who can reinvent a company's culture and operations, are the Holy Grail of executive searches these days....with so many companies looking for new brooms to sweep away their cobwebs, every manager or consultant on the prowl for bigger responsibilities wants to be one. But job seekers beware, because these positions _ which can range from unit heads to CEOs _ can be booby traps. CEOs love the idea of change, but the actual practice can be a blow to their egos.

Recruiter Dennis Krieger tells of the executive brought in to revamp the financial department of an industrial distributor. Four months later, the CEO wanted to fire him for being ``too aggressive and upsetting too many people,'' Mr. Krieger says. The CEO reconsidered after conceding the executive had met his goals.

``They say they want you to question everything, but they don't really want that,'' says Terry Gallagher, executive vice president of Battalia Winston in New York...a wise change agent often is more of a prod than a broom. ``A real change agent isn't someone who's going to make a lot of changes,'' Mr. Herz says. They're diplomats and motivators who will ``change the mood'' so those around them can make changes....investigate before accepting a job. A conservative approach, says executive recruiter Rex T. Olsen of Enterchange Executive Horizons, is to look for a company where change has already begun. ``Management may say it wants change, but if nothing is going on, how can you tell?''
executive_management  movingonup  change  Hal_Lancaster  Managing_Your_Career  organizational_change  organizational_culture  organizational_design  change_agents  managing_change  executive_search 
december 2012 by jerryking
When a Recruiter Comes Knocking, Be Ready to Respond - WSJ.com
August 6, 1996 | WSJ |By PERRI CAPELL.
* Always take the call. If you don't cooperate, chances are you won't be contacted by the firm again.
*Find out more about the firm. Although there is some blurring of the lines, search firms usually are divided into two types -- retained and contingency -- and it helps to know the difference. Retained firms such as Korn/Ferry, the world's largest in terms of revenue, and Heidrick & Struggles in Chicago are paid to conduct a search, even if no one is ultimately hired. Contingency firms, such as Management Recruiters International, Cleveland, and Robert Half International , RHI -0.34% Menlo Park, Calif., getpaid only if their candidate is placed.
*READ BETWEEN the lines. During your first conversation, you won't be given the name of the hiring company, just a brief description of the opening and its requirements. The recruiter will then ask if you know anyone suitable for the job. Be equally discreet in return.
* Be articulate and positive. The fact that you've been called means you have the right background for an opening. Don't assume you're just chatting; the search firm will be evaluating whether you have the communication skills and other "intangibles" needed for the job.

* Don't exaggerate. When asked about your accomplishments or earnings, don't embellish.
executive_search  executive_management  Managing_Your_Career  preparation  readiness 
december 2012 by jerryking
Growth Hacker is the new VP Marketing | @andrewchen
The rise of the Growth Hacker
The new job title of “Growth Hacker” is integrating itself into Silicon Valley’s culture, emphasizing that coding and technical chops are now an essential part of being a great marketer. Growth hackers are a hybrid of marketer and coder, one who looks at the traditional question of “How do I get customers for my product?” and answers with A/B tests, landing pages, viral factor, email deliverability, and Open Graph. On top of this, they layer the discipline of direct marketing, with its emphasis on quantitative measurement, scenario modeling via spreadsheets, and a lot of database queries. If a startup is pre-product/market fit, growth hackers can make sure virality is embedded at the core of a product. After product/market fit, they can help run up the score on what’s already working.

This isn’t just a single role – the entire marketing team is being disrupted. Rather than a VP of Marketing with a bunch of non-technical marketers reporting to them, instead growth hackers are engineers leading teams of engineers. The process of integrating and optimizing your product to a big platform requires a blurring of lines between marketing, product, and engineering, so that they work together to make the product market itself. Projects like email deliverability, page-load times, and Facebook sign-in are no longer technical or design decisions – instead they are offensive weapons to win in the market.

The stakes are huge because of “superplatforms” giving access to 100M+ consumers
These skills are invaluable and can change the trajectory of a new product. For the first time ever, it’s possible for new products to go from zero to 10s of millions users in just a few years. Great examples include Pinterest, Zynga, Groupon, Instagram, Dropbox. New products with incredible traction emerge every week. These products, with millions of users, are built on top of new, open platforms that in turn have hundreds of millions of users – Facebook and Apple in particular. Whereas the web in 1995 consisted of a mere 16 million users on dialup, today over 2 billion people access the internet. On top of these unprecedented numbers, consumers use super-viral communication platforms that rapidly speed up the proliferation of new products – not only is the market bigger, but it moves faster too.

Before this era, the discipline of marketing relied on the only communication channels that could reach 10s of millions of people – newspaper, TV, conferences, and channels like retail stores. To talk to these communication channels, you used people – advertising agencies, PR, keynote speeches, and business development. Today, the traditional communication channels are fragmented and passe. The fastest way to spread your product is by distributing it on a platform using APIs, not MBAs. Business development is now API-centric, not people-centric.

Whereas PR and press used to be the drivers of customer acquisition, instead it’s now a lagging indicator that your Facebook integration is working. The role of the VP of Marketing, long thought to be a non-technical role, is rapidly fading and in its place, a new breed of marketer/coder hybrids have emerged.
growth  marketing  hacks  blogs  Silicon_Valley  executive_management  virality  experimentation  trial_&_error  coding  platforms  executive_search  CMOs  measurements  growth_hacking  APIs  new_products  lagging_indicators  offensive_tactics 
december 2012 by jerryking
Starting Up in High Gear
July-August 2000 | HBR |An Interview with Vinod Khosla by David Champion and Nicholas G. Carr.

To create the kind of new wealth you’re talking about, we’re going to have to see massive investments in information technology. Where’s the money going to come from?

It’s going to come out of corporate budgets. Companies invest wherever they’re going to get the biggest returns, and right now that’s IT. Look at the trend in capital expenditures. Twenty years ago, information technology accounted for about 10% of capital expenditures in the United States. ...
Today, if you have a plan for a new business, you circulate it in the venture community and you get funded in a week. What you don’t get is an honest, painstaking critique. What are the downsides in your plan? What are the shortcomings? What are the weak links? The strengths of your idea get a lot of attention, but the weaknesses get ignored—and ultimately it’s the weaknesses of your plan that will kill you. A start-up is only as strong as its weakest link....
The first thing we focused on was getting the right set of people for the company—the right gene pool. We started out on the technical end. Pradeep had helped architect the Ultrasparc processor at Sun, so he had strong skills in building technical architectures and could apply those skills to routers. But he needed somebody with experience in building and operating an IP network, and he needed somebody who’d done operating systems software for routers and somebody who’d done protocols for routers. So we drew out a map that said, “Here are the ten different areas of expertise we need.” Then we made a list of the companies doing the best work in each area, and we listed the five people in each company who would make good targets. We went after those people, and piece by piece we assembled a multidisciplinary team that could make Juniper a leader.
IT  interviews  HBR  Kleiner_Perkins  start_ups  large_companies  management_consulting  Vinod_Khosla  executive_search  shortcomings  weaknesses  new_businesses  CAPEX  weak_links  Nicholas_Carr  talent_acquisition  gene_pool  expertise  team_risk  wealth_creation  cross-pollination  interdisciplinary  teams  protocols 
june 2012 by jerryking
The tricks to recruiting top talent
Oct. 04, 2010 | The Globe & Mail | VIRGINIA GALT. Top
desires of a job seeker. Money: “Most of us who deal with this have a
rule of thumb that you have to give at least a 10% increase to move
anybody,” says Toronto lawyer Stewart Saxe. An equity stake: “The real
upside is in the equity participation if you are at a senior enough
level,” said recruiter Tom Long. “What they are looking for is the
opportunity to participate … and have a home run.” Work-life balance:
“Three weeks of vacation is now pretty standard. In addition, some shops
close between Christmas and New Years, and a lot of firms are also
giving five personal days as floaters,” said Katie Dolgin .
“Flexibility, being able to work from home occasionally if they have a
sick child, is important.” A safety net: This is particularly important
for executives who leave big jobs for smaller, younger enterprises,
recruiters say. Many candidates will insist on severance clauses to
protect themselves if things go south.
talent  recruiting  Virginia_Galt  Google  LinkedIn  Pablo_Picasso  ksfs  small_business  executive_management  executive_search  safety_nets  inducements  work_life_balance  equity  flexibility 
october 2010 by jerryking

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