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jerryking : expertise   28

The Future of Elite Schools in the Trump Era (and the Future of Blogging) - The Atlantic
James Fallows
3:05 PM / April 14, 2018

a message that came in from a reader in an elite-university college town. (OK: It’s New Haven.) He says that an under-appreciated aspect of Donald Trump’s war on expertise deserves further attention. .....From where I sit, the schools are woefully under-prepared for the Trump onslaught and I predict that they will get slammed and have to change their policies. To imagine what future Harvard classes will look like if the schools lose the court cases, look to what happened to Berkeley when they were constrained by Proposition 209 from considering using affirmative action policies-- the percentage of Asian American and White students increased, while Black and Latino representation decreased.

When I think about the rise of Trump, I believe that part of the blame should rest at the feet of Harvard, Yale and their peers.

Clinton, Bush, and Obama stacked their administration with graduates from these schools and the global economic system that they created (and profited from) had important flaws that hurt certain sectors of the US and provided fertile ground for Trump's dark vision of a sort of economic conspiracy holding back real Americans. As a group, they often were arrogant and felt that they knew best. Yet they also weren't smart enough to understand how the economic world that they created actually had some fundamental flaws that would come to threaten the elite global world view that they thought was inevitable.
James_Fallows  elitism  Ivy_League  Colleges_&_Universities  Red_states  Donald_Trump  expertise  Department_of_Justice  admissions 
april 2018 by jerryking
For workers, challenge is all to easily ducked
July 2017 | Financial Times | Tim Harford

Cal Newport: Deep Work
Robert Twiggs : Micromastery

The modern knowledge worker — a programmer, a lawyer, a newspaper columnist — might appear inoculated from Adam Smith’s concern. We face not monotony but the temptations of endless variety, with the entire internet just a click away. All too easily, we can be pulled into the cycle of what slot-machine designers call a “ludic loop”, repeating the same actions again and again. Check email. Check Facebook. Check Instagram. Check Twitter. Check email. Repeat....what is a ludic loop but “performing a few simple operations, of which the effects, too, are perhaps always the same”?

Smith was concerned about jobs that provided no mental challenge: if problems or surprises never arose, then a worker “has no occasion to exert his understanding, or to exercise his invention, in . . . removing difficulties which never occur.”

For the modern knowledge worker, the problem is not that the work lacks challenge, but that the challenge is easily ducked. This point is powerfully made by computer scientist Cal Newport in his book Deep Work. Work that matters is often difficult. It can be absorbing in mid-flow and satisfying in retrospect, but it is intimidating and headache-inducing and full of false starts.

[Responding to ] Email is easier. And reading Newport’s book I realised that email posed a double temptation: not only is it an instant release from a hard task, but it even seems like work. Being an email ninja looks professional and seems professional — but all too often, it is displacement activity for the work that really matters.

A curious echo of Smith’s warning comes in Robert Twigger’s new book Micromastery. Mr Twigger sings the praises of mastering one small skill at a time: not how to cook, but how to make the perfect omelette; not how to build a log cabin, but how to chop a log. We go deep — as Newport demands — but these sharp spikes of skill are satisfying, not too hard to acquire and a path to true expertise.

They also provide variety. “Simply growing up in the premodern period guaranteed a polymathic background,” writes Twigger. To prosper in the premodern era required many different skills; a smart person would be able to see a problem from many angles. A craft-based, practical upbringing means creative thinking comes naturally. “It is only as we surge towards greater specialisation and mechanisation that we begin to talk about creativity and innovation.”

Three lessons:
(1) learning matters. Smith wanted schooling for all; Twigger urges us to keep schooling ourselves. Both are right.
(2) serious work requires real effort, and it can be tempting to duck that effort. Having the freedom to avoid strenuous thinking is a privilege I am glad to have — but I am happier when I don’t abuse that freedom. [Mavity says: “If you need to produce an idea, isolating yourself can be enormously beneficial.”......“How you do that in a big open-plan office with 100 other people trying to be creative at the same time?.......Solitude is in hopelessly short supply at a time when companies are captivated by the financial allure of the open-plan office and its evil twin, hot-desking. ]
(3) old-fashioned craft offered us something special. To Smith it was the challenge that came from solving unpredictable problems. To Twigger it is the variety of having to do many small things well. To Newport, it is the flow that comes from deep immersion in a skill that requires mastery. Perhaps all three mean the same thing.

Smith realised that the coming industrial age threatened these special joys of work. The post-industrial age threatens them too, in a rather different way. ....“The understandings of the greater part of men are necessarily formed by their ordinary employments,” wrote Smith. So whether at work or at play, let us take care that we employ ourselves wisely.
Adam_Smith  books  busywork  Cal_Newport  distractions  expertise  GTD  hard_work  industrial_age  knowledge_workers  lessons_learned  productivity  polymaths  premodern  procrastination  skills  solitude  thinking_deliberatively  Tim_Harford  what_really_matters 
august 2017 by jerryking
How Successful People Network with Each Other
JANUARY 21, 2016 | ???| Dorie Clark. Ms. Clark is a marketing strategist and professional speaker who teaches at Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business. She is the author of Reinventing You and Stand Out. You can receive her free Stand Out Self-Assessment Workbook.

As you advance in your career, you have more experience and more connections to draw on for networking. But chances are you’ve also become a lot busier — as have the really successful people you’re now trying to meet. How do you get the attention of people who get dozens of invitations per week and hundreds of emails per day? And how do you find time to network with potential new clients or to recruit new employees when your calendar is packed?

The typical advice that’s given to entry-level employees — Invite people to coffee! Connect with them on LinkedIn! — simply doesn’t work for people at the top of their careers. Instead, you need to leverage an entirely different strategy, something I call “inbound networking.”

In the online world, “inbound marketing” is a term that was popularized about a decade ago by HubSpot cofounders Brian Halligan and Dharmesh Shah. It refers to the practice of creating valuable content, such as articles or podcasts, that draws customers to you directly (as opposed to spending a lot of time on cold calls or paying for advertising to lure them in).

Networking is facing a similar inflection point. Most professionals are constantly bombarded with Facebook and LinkedIn connection requests, not to mention endless requests to “pick their brain.” Trying to stand out in the midst of that noise is a losing battle, and you probably don’t have time to send a bunch of cold emails anyway.

Instead, you can successfully network with the most prominent people by doing something very different from everyone else: attracting them to you with inbound networking. In other words, make yourself interesting enough that they choose to seek you out. Here are three ways to do it.

(1) Identify what sets you apart. (What's your special sauce?). One of the fastest ways to build a connection with someone is to find a commonality you share with them (your alma mater, a love of dogs, a passion for clean tech). That’s table stakes. But the way to genuinely capture their interest is to share something that seems exotic to them. It will often vary by context: In a roomful of political operatives, the fact that I was a former presidential campaign spokesperson is nice but not very interesting. But at a political fundraiser populated by lawyers and financiers, that background would make me a very desirable conversation partner.

The more interesting you seem, the more that powerful people will want to seek you out. And yet it can be hard for us to identify what’s most interesting about ourselves; over time, even the coolest things can come to seem banal. Ask your friends to identify the most fascinating elements of your biography, your interests, or your experiences — then do the same for them. At one recent workshop I led, we discovered that one executive had been a ball boy for the U.S. Open tennis tournament in his youth, and one attorney is an avid and regular surfer in the waters of New York City. Both are intriguing enough to spark a great conversation.

(2) Become a connoisseur. Almost nothing elicits more interest than genuine expertise. If someone is drawn to a topic that you’re knowledgeable about, you’ll move to the top of their list. Since publishing my books, I’ve had innumerable colleagues seek me out to get advice about finding an agent or fine-tuning their manuscripts.

But sometimes it’s even better when your expertise is outside the fold of your profession. Richard, a financial journalist I profiled in my book Reinventing You, was able to build better and deeper relationships with his sources after he started to write part-time about food and wine. He discovered that his Wall Street contacts would proactively call him up to get information about hot new restaurants or the best places to entertain their clients.

You can also use nontraditional expertise to build multidimensional connections. Bill Gates and Warren Buffett could certainly have a decent conversation about business. But it’s their expert-level seriousness about the card game bridge that cemented their bond, eventually leading to Buffett’s decision to entrust billions to the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

When you’re an expert in a given niche, you can often connect on a level playing field with people who, under other circumstances, might be out of reach. One friend of mine, a corporate executive who produces jazz records on the side, recently got invited to the home of an internationally famous rock star as Grammy campaign season heated up.

If you know a lot about wine, or nutrition, or salsa dancing, or email marketing, or any of a million other subjects, people who care about that topic are sure to be interested in what you have to say.

(3) Become the center of the network. It’s not easy to build a high-powered network if you’re not already powerful. But New York City resident Jon Levy took the position that the best way to get invited to the party is to host the party. Nearly six years ago, he started hosting twice-monthly “Influencers” dinner gatherings, featuring luminaries in different fields. Levy’s gatherings now attract a guest roster of Nobel laureates and Olympic athletes. But he certainly didn’t start there.

Begin by inviting the most interesting professionals you know and asking them to recommend the most interesting people they know, and over time you can build a substantial network. At a certain point you’ll gain enough momentum that professionals who have heard about the dinners will even reach out to ask for an invitation. As Levy joked to one publication, “One day, I hope to accomplish something worthy of an invite to my own dinner.” When you’re the host, pulling together a great event liberates you to invite successful people who you might not normally consider your peers but who embrace the chance to network with other high-quality professionals.

I’ve also hosted more than two dozen dinner parties to broaden my network and meet interesting people. But that’s certainly not the only way to connect. These days, any professional who makes the effort to start a Meetup or Facebook group that brings people together could accomplish something similar.

The world is competing for the attention of the most successful people. If you want to meet them — and break through and build a lasting connection — the best strategy is to make them come to you. Identifying what’s uniquely interesting about you and becoming a connoisseur and a hub are techniques that will ensure you’re sought after by the people you’d most like to know.
networking  via:enochko  Communicating_&_Connecting  connoisseurship  hubs  creating_valuable_content  idea_generation  content_creators  personal_branding  attention_spans  inbound_marketing  high-quality  expertise  think_threes  special_sauce  personal_accomplishments  inflection_points  insights 
april 2017 by jerryking
Dancing with Disruption - Mike Lipkin
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By Mike Lipkin
#1. Become someone who knows.....a secret is a formula or knowledge that is only known to a few. If you own a secret, you have the power to share it so you can turn the few into the many. Secrets are everywhere – hiding in plain sight. The difference between someone who knows and someone who doesn’t is the willingness to do the work, find the information, talk to the people and formulate one’s strategy. Be a source of joy and not a source of stress!! Disruption begins long before.....Mastering other people's emotions....Add in a way that thrills and delights others!! Prospective of Personal Mastery....industry connection + internal influence.
# 2. Have an audacious ambition. If you want to be a disruptor, you can be humble, but you can’t be modest. You have to dream big....dream bigger than anything that gets in its way.
#3. Be simultaneously analytical and creative. There may be a gap in the market, but is there a market in the gap? ...Disruption demands left and right brain firing together. Your intuition may alert you to the opportunity but it’s your intellect that builds your business case. That’s why you need wingmen or women to complement your capacity. Fly social not solo.
#4. Be prolific. The more you lose, the more you win. 1.0 is always imperfect. You will hear the word “no” hundreds of times more than the word “yes.” The best way to get ready is to do things before you’re ready. The best you can do is get it as right as you can the first time [i.e. "good enough"] and then get better, stronger, smarter. Disruptors try a lot more things than disruptees. They fail fast and they fail forward. [Practice: repeated performance or systematic exercise for the purpose of acquiring skill or proficiency.
#5. Communicate like magic. If you want to be a disruptor, you must be a great communicator. ... the right words generate oxytocin – the love hormone, whereas the wrong words generate cortisol, the stress hormone. .... tell your story in a way that opens people’s hearts, minds and wallets to you. Create a vocabulary.
#6. Be a talent magnet. Disruption demands the boldest and brightest partners....The best talent goes where it earns the highest return. Reputation is everything. [What would Mandela do?]
#7. Play like a champion today. Disruptors may not always play at their best but they play their best every day. They bring their A-Game no matter who they’re playing....you feel their intensity and passion. How hard are you hustling on any given day? Everything matters. There is no such thing as small. They’re all in, all the time.
disruption  personal_branding  uncertainty  hard_work  Pablo_Picasso  creativity  intuition  intensity  passions  talent  failure  partnerships  reputation  Communicating_&_Connecting  storytelling  thinking_big  expertise  inequality_of_information  knowledge_intensive  imperfections  audacity  special_sauce  prolificacy  affirmations  unshared_information  good_enough  pairs  Mike_Lipkin  CAIF 
april 2017 by jerryking
The Power of ‘Why?’ and ‘What If?’ - The New York Times
JULY 2, 2016 | New York Times | By WARREN BERGER.

business leaders want the people working around them to be more curious, more cognizant of what they don’t know, and more inquisitive — about everything, including “Why am I doing my job the way I do it?” and “How might our company find new opportunities?”....Companies in many industries today must contend with rapid change and rising uncertainty. In such conditions, even a well-established company cannot rest on its expertise; there is pressure to keep learning what’s new and anticipating what’s next. It’s hard to do any of that without asking questions.

Steve Quatrano, a member of the Right Question Institute, a nonprofit research group, explains that the act of formulating questions enables us “to organize our thinking around what we don’t know.” This makes questioning a good skill to hone in dynamic times.....So how can companies encourage people to ask more questions? There are simple ways to train people to become more comfortable and proficient at it. For example, question formulation exercises can be used as a substitute for conventional brainstorming sessions. The idea is to put a problem or challenge in front of a group of people and instead of asking for ideas, instruct participants to generate as many relevant questions as they can.......Getting employees to ask more questions is the easy part; getting management to respond well to those questions can be harder.......think of “what if” and “how might we” questions about the company’s goals and plans........Leaders can also encourage companywide questioning by being more curious and inquisitive themselves.
asking_the_right_questions  questions  curiosity  humility  pretense_of_knowledge  unknowns  leadership  innovation  idea_generation  ideas  information_gaps  cost_of_inaction  expertise  anticipating  brainstorming  dynamic  change  uncertainty  rapid_change  inquisitiveness  Dr.Alexander's_Question  incisiveness  leaders  companywide 
july 2016 by jerryking
Expertise in scaling up is the visible secret of Silicon Valley - FT.com
September 15, 2015 |FT| Reid Hoffman.

Most observers instinctively conclude that Silicon Valley is great because it has a unique ability to create start-ups. Most observers are wrong....Why does Silicon Valley continue to produce a disproportionate share of industry-transforming companies like Google, Facebook and LinkedIn? Or the next generation of companies like Airbnb, Dropbox, and Uber? The answer, which has been hiding in plain sight, is Silicon Valley’s ability to support scale-ups....Most of the impact and value creation in Silicon Valley actually occurs after the start-up phase ends and the scale-up phase begins.
Building great, world-changing companies requires more than just building a cool app and raising money. Entrepreneurs need to build massive organisations, user bases and businesses, at a dizzyingly rapid pace.....So what makes Silicon Valley so good at scale-ups? The obvious answers are talent and capital. Both offer a scale-up positive feedback loops. The competitor that gets to scale first nearly always wins. First-scaler advantage beats first-mover advantage. Once a scale-up occupies the high ground in its ecosystem, the networks around it recognise its leadership, and talent and capital flood in....talent and capital are necessary but not sufficient. The key success factor is actually a comprehensive and adaptable approach to scale. A scale-up grows so fast that conventional management approaches are doomed to fail. ...Change, not stability, is the default state at every stage and in every facet of the company. Continually reinventing yourself, your product and your organisation won’t be easy, but it will allow you to use rapid scaling as a strategic weapon to attain and retain market leadership.
blitzscaling  capital  change  constant_change  disproportionality  entrepreneur  expertise  first_movers  ksfs  networks  Reid_Hoffman  reinvention  scaling  Silicon_Valley  special_sauce  start_ups  talent  user_bases 
september 2015 by jerryking
What to Learn in College to Stay One Step Ahead of Computers - NYTimes.com
MAY 22, 2015 | NYT | By ROBERT J. SHILLER.

The successful occupations, by this measure, shared certain characteristics: People who practiced them needed complex communication skills and expert knowledge. Such skills included an ability to convey “not just information but a particular interpretation of information.” They said that expert knowledge was broad, deep and practical, allowing the solution of “uncharted problems.”

These attributes may not be as beneficial in the future. But the study certainly suggests that a college education needs to be broad and general, and not defined primarily by the traditional structure of separate departments staffed by professors who want, most of all, to be at the forefront of their own narrow disciplines.....In a separate May 5 statement, Prof. Sean D. Kelly, chairman of the General Education Review Committee, said a Harvard education should give students “an art of living in the world.”

But how should professors do this? Perhaps we should prepare students for entrepreneurial opportunities suggested by our own disciplines. Even departments entirely divorced from business could do this by suggesting enterprises, nonprofits and activities in which students can later use their specialized knowledge....I continue to update the course, thinking about how I can integrate its lessons into an “art of living in the world.” I have tried to enhance my students’ sense that finance should be the art of financing important human activities, of getting people (and robots someday) working together to accomplish things that we really want done.
Robert_Shiller  Yale  Harvard  college-educated  education  students  automation  machine_learning  Colleges_&_Universities  finance  continuing_education  continuous_learning  Communicating_&_Connecting  indispensable  skills  Managing_Your_Career  21st._century  new_graduates  interdisciplinary  curriculum  entrepreneurship  syllabus  interpretation  expertise  uncharted_problems 
may 2015 by jerryking
How Not to Drown in Numbers - NYTimes.com
MAY 2, 2015| NYT |By ALEX PEYSAKHOVICH and SETH STEPHENS-DAVIDOWITZ.

If you’re trying to build a self-driving car or detect whether a picture has a cat in it, big data is amazing. But here’s a secret: If you’re trying to make important decisions about your health, wealth or happiness, big data is not enough.

The problem is this: The things we can measure are never exactly what we care about. Just trying to get a single, easy-to-measure number higher and higher (or lower and lower) doesn’t actually help us make the right choice. For this reason, the key question isn’t “What did I measure?” but “What did I miss?”...So what can big data do to help us make big decisions? One of us, Alex, is a data scientist at Facebook. The other, Seth, is a former data scientist at Google. There is a special sauce necessary to making big data work: surveys and the judgment of humans — two seemingly old-fashioned approaches that we will call small data....For one thing, many teams ended up going overboard on data. It was easy to measure offense and pitching, so some organizations ended up underestimating the importance of defense, which is harder to measure. In fact, in his book “The Signal and the Noise,” Nate Silver of fivethirtyeight.com estimates that the Oakland A’s were giving up 8 to 10 wins per year in the mid-1990s because of their lousy defense.

And data-driven teams found out the hard way that scouts were actually important...We are optimists about the potential of data to improve human lives. But the world is incredibly complicated. No one data set, no matter how big, is going to tell us exactly what we need. The new mountains of blunt data sets make human creativity, judgment, intuition and expertise more valuable, not less.

==============================================
From Market Research: Safety Not Always in Numbers | Qualtrics ☑
Author: Qualtrics|July 28, 2010

Albert Einstein once said, “Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted.” [Warning of the danger of overquantification) Although many market research experts would say that quantitative research is the safest bet when one has limited resources, it can be dangerous to assume that it is always the best option.
human_ingenuity  data  analytics  small_data  massive_data_sets  data_driven  information_overload  dark_data  measurements  creativity  judgment  intuition  Nate_Silver  expertise  datasets  information_gaps  unknowns  underestimation  infoliteracy  overlooked_opportunities  sense-making  easy-to-measure  Albert_Einstein  special_sauce  metrics  overlooked  defensive_tactics  emotional_intelligence  EQ  soft_skills  overquantification  false_confidence 
may 2015 by jerryking
Getting Started in ‘Big Data’ - The CFO Report - WSJ
February 4, 2014 | WSJ |by JAMES WILLHITE.

executives and recruiters, who compete for talent in the nascent specialty, point to hiring strategies that can get a big-data operation off the ground. They say they look for specific industry experience, poach from data-rich rivals, rely on interview questions that screen out weaker candidates and recommend starting with small projects.

David Ginsberg, chief data scientist at business-software maker SAP AG , said communication skills are critically important in the field, and that a key player on his big-data team is a “guy who can translate Ph.D. to English. Those are the hardest people to find.”

Along with the ability to explain their findings, data scientists need to have a proven record of being able to pluck useful information from data that often lack an obvious structure and may even come from a dubious source. This expertise doesn’t always cut across industry lines. A scientist with a keen knowledge of the entertainment industry, for example, won’t necessarily be able to transfer his skills to the fast-food market.

Some candidates can make the leap. Wolters Kluwer NV, a Netherlands-based information-services provider, has had some success in filling big-data jobs by recruiting from other, data-rich industries, such as financial services. “We have found tremendous success with going to alternative sources and looking at different businesses and saying, ‘What can you bring into our business?’ ” said Kevin Entricken, the company’s chief financial officer.
massive_data_sets  analytics  data_scientists  cross-industry  recruiting  howto  poaching  plain_English  connecting_the_dots  storytelling  SAP  Wolters_Kluwer  expertise  Communicating_&_Connecting  unstructured_data  war_for_talent  talent  PhDs  executive_search  artificial_intelligence  nontraditional 
june 2014 by jerryking
Do People Need Libraries in the Digital Age? - Speakeasy - WSJ
Feb 12, 2014| WSJ| by Christopher John Farley.

Google recently launched a program called “Helpouts” which connects people with experts. There’s no reason future libraries couldn’t do something similar, acting as a hub for putting people in touch, via Skype or in person, with book authors, professors, and learned members of the community. A number of places around the world are already setting up such “living libraries,” allowing people to contact people in the know directly. The Ptolemies pioneered a similar concept, bringing together some of the leading thinkers of the Hellenistic world for the Museum at Alexandria, which was linked to the Great Library.

Libraries of the future could be places we go not to just check out books, but to check out each other–to participate, face to face, in cultural activities in a way we can’t do over the internet. Some of this is being done. Perhaps more of it needs to be done soon.
libraries  expertise  human_experience  personal_libraries  personal_connections 
february 2014 by jerryking
Ten ways to position yourself as a thought leader - The Globe and Mail
Jeff Quipp (for Charles Waud & WaudWare)

Contributed to The Globe and Mail

Published Friday, Dec. 13 2013

key tips for professionals and business owners looking to carve out their place as thought leaders:

1. Blog. Wordpress is a popular platform and easy to use. Set up your blog and your editorial calendar (what you’ll blog about/when) at the same time with a commitment to blogging once a week.

2. Create e-books and white papers. This content showcases in-depth knowledge and entices website visitors to subscribe in order to access the information. By offering a valuable piece of content in exchange for their contact information you can continue to share insights and solicit feedback that informs your future content creation. These items are subsequently shared through various social networks thereby growing your profile as an authority. To begin this process, identify the areas for which you have the expertise to create a “how-to” guide. Offer information that is enduring while incorporating timely examples. Once created, the link and a call to action to download the e-book should be placed on every relevant page of your website. Using the contact information that was submitted in order to download the e-book, you can then carry on a dialogue with a captive audience and continue to define yourself as an authority in that space/on that topic.

3. PR and media coverage. Earned media is the signal that what you are doing or saying is newsworthy. Obtaining coverage of new initiatives, launches, and products adds profile and builds your caché in the public eye. Earned media is much more trusted than owned or paid media. It’s worth the investment to outsource this to an expert. You can be a thought leader and still outsource part of the effort to communicate that fact.

4. Speak at conferences (expertise). Every time you put yourself in the role of presenter or panel speaker for conferences you are building your authority as the go-to for those looking to glean new learning and best practices. Especially when the conference speaks to your industry, it takes confidence in your own knowledge and expertise to take on that role. If you establish yourself as being assured of your authority, others will confirm it through word of mouth and insider discussions about those speaker events. Look for opportunities by researching conferences by geography, topic, industry or associations with which you want to connect. When speaking, err on the side of giving people more -- not less -- so they walk away impressed, give good reviews, and buoy your reputation as a desired speaker.

5. Make yourself available through Q & A sites. Whether it’s an online industry forum or LinkedIn, professional chats are an ever-increasing avenue to get your thoughts and opinions seen.

6. Twitter chats. Every day, thousands of Twitter chats take place bringing people from all across the globe together, online, in real time, to discuss topics of interest.

7. Publish news early. Sharing news is vital on social media channels to carve out your space as an authority; it shows you’re on top of what’s happening. But being among the first to do so is key. Anyone can retweet the headline from today’s paper. Share it early and go the extra mile to find and share emerging news from less prevalent sources – keep in mind time differences and get your news from sources that may be ahead.

8. Expert commentary (expertise) on breaking news in your field. The latest launch, merger, acquisition. There are always changes and those are just the facts. What about the impact and the future it bears? Offer your expert commentary to key media as the news happens. Offer thoughtful input and practical tips to address changes or exploit opportunities; this is where your trusted PR experts come in handy. Additionally use these opportunities to fuel a blog and leverage those posts on your website and social media channels where they often get additional pick up. Remember, ***don’t just share the news – add value – say what it means to your current/prospective clients.***

9. Connect with other thought leaders. Comment on blogs or in LinkedIn groups within your industry. It will help get your name out there on topics that current and prospective stakeholders are interested in talking about and your comments will also be found in Google searches of your name. If other thought leaders are talking to you and about you that translates to a level of success by association.

10. Be a mentor. Offer your support to those coming up in the field. Whether it’s in the form of informational interviews, reviewing a proposal and providing feedback, speaking at postsecondary institutions or sitting on program advisory committees. By growing your presence as a source of influence and inspiration others will seek out your advice, input and professional service and spread the word about your authority.
thought_leadership  expertise  personal_branding  Managing_Your_Career  JCK  mentoring  content_creators  creating_valuable_content  public_speaking 
december 2013 by jerryking
At Your Service
Autumn 2013 | University of Toronto Magazine| By Janet Rowe.

Personal librarians help first-year students understand U of T’s libraries....For students who haven’t been assigned a personal librarian, Vine offers an insider secret. “One of my favourite ‘hidden’ resources is a set of bibliographies on many subjects,” she says. “Prepared by experts, each item has an abstract that can help you figure out if the article is suitable for your assignment – a big time-saver for busy students. The trick is to look under ‘Oxford Bibliographies Online’ in the library catalogue.” Bonus: many paywall-protected articles are free when accessed through the library website.
personal_libraries  libraries  uToronto  curation  Colleges_&_Universities  research  paywalls  hidden  personalization  outreach  expertise 
november 2013 by jerryking
Help yourself by helping others
?? | Globe & Mail | Lynda Taller-Wakter.

* Define your objectives, then find an organization that can help you achieve them. if fund raising is the skill you want to develop, target a bigger organization with canvassing and other related opportunities.
* Don’t dismiss the importance of volunteer work on a résumé.
* Volunteer, even if you don’t think you have the time.
* Volunteer work can build your esteem - an important stepping stone for getting back to work.
* Test your skills in the marketplace as soon as possible.
* Joining the right organizations can raise your profile at work.
* Network wisely
* Develop acumen in a new field. If career is behind your volunteering, supplement it: there are courses in such areas as fund raising and festivals management.
volunteering  Managing_Your_Career  business_acumen  résumés  expertise  job_search  tips  serving_others  networking  generosity 
december 2012 by jerryking
Striking a Balance Between Expertise, Wearing Many Hats - WSJ.com
April 30, 1996 | WSJ | By HAL LANCASTER.
Managers Must Balance Expertise and Generality.

SHOULD TODAY'S managers be generalists or specialists?

Generalists, says the conventional wisdom, because today's shrinking corporations are eliminating so many specialist functions. The people left are in charge of more employees and more departments, managing teams made up of various specialties. Besides, today's hot technological specialty can quickly become obsolete.

As usual, however, the conventional wisdom is an oversimplification. Most people in big companies still advance based on accomplishments in some area of expertise. And to keep up in fast-moving markets, companies often need even deeper levels of expertise than they once did.
Managing_Your_Career  Hal_Lancaster  generalists  specialists  oversimplification  expertise 
december 2012 by jerryking
Taking Risk To the Marketplace
March 6, 2000 | Fortune Magazine | By Thomas A. Stewart.

* "You should always value the ability to move and change, because that creates options, and options are valuable,"
* Traditional risk management, with its emphasis on real property and financial events, isn't enough for knowledge companies, whose big risks are intellectual assets, such as brand equity, human capital, innovation, and their network of relationships.
* you have to know what's at risk-- which isn't always easy for intangible assets.
* Each intangible asset has a different risk profile.
*Thinking like a portfolio manager works for risk management as well as for strategy, says Bruce Pasternak, head of the strategic leadership practice at Booz Allen & Hamilton. In either case, adaptability is a cardinal virtue; the top goal is organizational flexibility. All-or-nothing bets like insurance have limited use in protecting cash flows from intangibles because their value is so uncertain, says Anjana Bhattacharee, director of Aporia, a British startup developing tools to manage those risks. Hedging also has problems. Says Bjarni Armannsson, head of the Icelandic Investment Bank in Reykjavik: "It's difficult to find a counterparty for intellectual risks." To hedge against falling gas prices, Enron can sell the risk to someone who fears rising prices, like a utility, but how do you hedge against a loss of expertise or brand equity

* Markets are full of risk, but it turns out that they're a lot safer than rigid structures. Intellectual assets and operations obey no one's command and are subject to discontinuous--i.e., quantum--change. There are four ways to respond to risk: Avoid it, reduce it, transfer it, or accept it. The one thing you can't do, if it's intellectual risk, is tie it up and subdue it.
Thomas_Stewart  risks  risk-management  organizational_flexibility  adaptability  binary_decisionmaking  intellectual_risks  human_capital  insurance  intellectual_assets  brand_equity  intangibles  networks  interconnections  discontinuities  expertise  portfolios  options  portfolio_management  cash_flows  generating_strategic_options  optionality  brittle  antifragility  step_change  counterparties  network_risk 
december 2012 by jerryking
Operational Expertise Makes the Difference
Fall 2004 | The Journal of Private Equity | Peter L. Tourtellot

In the last decade, companies in need of innovative change-agents learned to look outside their industries for new chief executives. These leaders were just what the companies needed: outsiders with a fresh perspective that
encourage strategic and organizational change. When a company is in distress. it needs to make drastic changes An industry outsider. with a wide range of operational experience is in the best position to get a handle on the root causes of trouble and identify applicable solutions from other industries that may never have occurred to the faltering company. Simply put. the need for industry experience in a turnaround situation is a myth. An industry outsider is the best source for the out-of-the-box thinking needed to reverse a company's decline.
turnarounds  execution  CEOs  private_equity  change_agents  industry_expertise  expertise  operations  outsiders  decline  out-of-the-box  fresh_eyes 
august 2012 by jerryking
Higher turnover level changing the face of corporate boards in Canada - The Globe and Mail
Feb. 20 2012 | G&M | JANET MCFARLAND

Boards are adding more people with specific industry expertise – rather than business generalists – as well as more first-time directors and far more female directors, according to a new study of 100 of Canada’s largest company boards by executive search firm Spencer Stuart.
boards_&_directors_&_governance  women  turnover  expertise  industry_expertise 
july 2012 by jerryking
Starting Up in High Gear
July-August 2000 | HBR |An Interview with Vinod Khosla by David Champion and Nicholas G. Carr.

To create the kind of new wealth you’re talking about, we’re going to have to see massive investments in information technology. Where’s the money going to come from?

It’s going to come out of corporate budgets. Companies invest wherever they’re going to get the biggest returns, and right now that’s IT. Look at the trend in capital expenditures. Twenty years ago, information technology accounted for about 10% of capital expenditures in the United States. ...
Today, if you have a plan for a new business, you circulate it in the venture community and you get funded in a week. What you don’t get is an honest, painstaking critique. What are the downsides in your plan? What are the shortcomings? What are the weak links? The strengths of your idea get a lot of attention, but the weaknesses get ignored—and ultimately it’s the weaknesses of your plan that will kill you. A start-up is only as strong as its weakest link....
The first thing we focused on was getting the right set of people for the company—the right gene pool. We started out on the technical end. Pradeep had helped architect the Ultrasparc processor at Sun, so he had strong skills in building technical architectures and could apply those skills to routers. But he needed somebody with experience in building and operating an IP network, and he needed somebody who’d done operating systems software for routers and somebody who’d done protocols for routers. So we drew out a map that said, “Here are the ten different areas of expertise we need.” Then we made a list of the companies doing the best work in each area, and we listed the five people in each company who would make good targets. We went after those people, and piece by piece we assembled a multidisciplinary team that could make Juniper a leader.
IT  interviews  HBR  Kleiner_Perkins  start_ups  large_companies  management_consulting  Vinod_Khosla  executive_search  shortcomings  weaknesses  new_businesses  CAPEX  weak_links  Nicholas_Carr  talent_acquisition  gene_pool  expertise  team_risk  wealth_creation  cross-pollination  interdisciplinary  teams  protocols 
june 2012 by jerryking
The Trouble with Big Data
May 5, 2012 | | What's The Big Data?| GilPress

“With too little data, you won’t be able to make any conclusions that you trust. With loads of data you will find relationships that aren’t real… On net, having a degree in math, economics, AI, etc., isn’t enough. Tool expertise isn’t enough. You need experience in solving real world problems, because there are a lot of important limitations to the statistics that you learned in school. Big data isn’t about bits, it’s about talent.”.....The “talent” of “understanding the problem and the data applicable to it” is what makes a good scientist: The required skepticism, the development of hypotheses (models), and the un-ending quest to refute them, following the scientific method that has brought us remarkable progress over the course of the last three hundred and fifty years.
in_the_real_world  massive_data_sets  blogs  skepticism  challenges  problems  problem_solving  expertise  statistics  talent  spurious  data_quality  data_scientists  haystacks  correlations  limitations 
june 2012 by jerryking
7 Easy Steps to Bootstrapping Success
Oct 1, 2010 | Inc. Magazine | By Andrew Park. In this economy,
you can pretty much forget about financing. And it's probably just as
well, says marketing guru Seth Godin, author of The Bootstrapper's
Bible. People often ask him for advice on raising venture capital for
their start-ups, and "nine times out of 10, I advise them they
shouldn't," he says. Instead, take these seven steps to self-funded
stardom. (1) GET CLOSE TO YOUR CUSTOMERS ; (2) MAKE CLIENTS PAY UP FRONT
;(3)FIND THE FREE LUNCH ;(4) FORGET STEALTH MODE ; (5)BECOME AN
EXPERT ; (6) ASK FOR HELP ; (7) BE PATIENT
Seth_Godin  bootstrapping  entrepreneurship  inspiration  start_ups  asking_for_help  funding  finance  tips  venture_capital  charge_for_something  stealth  expertise  patience  Pablo_Picasso  strategic_patience 
september 2010 by jerryking
globeadvisor.com: Experts of wrong: Beware biases of people-in-the-know
August 11, 2010 | The Globe and Mail | HARVEY SCHACHTER
who reviews Wrong, By David H. Freedman,
Little Brown, 295 pages, $31.99. Wrong: is an all-out assault on
experts, and, perhaps more significantly, our mindsets, which give the
experts more licence than they deserve...." Freedman says, "expert
wisdom usually turns out to be at best highly contested and ephemeral
and at worst flat-out wrong."... " A key problem is what he calls the
certainty principle. Given an expert who equivocates on some approach
and an expert who is dramatically certain, we opt for the expert with
conviction. "... " We want advice that's simple, clear-cut, doubt-free,
universal in application, upbeat, actionable, and palatable, in the
sense of conforming to our predispositions rather than challenging those
biases. " " "We happen to be complex creatures living in a complex
world, so why would we expect answers to any questions to be simple?" "
book_reviews  David_Freedman  complexity  conformity  expertise  Harvey_Schachter  biases  pretense_of_knowledge  overconfidence  certainty  confirmation_bias  books  questions  predispositions 
august 2010 by jerryking
The Path to Growth - WSJ.com
MARCH 3, 2007 | Wall Street Journal | By NORMAN T. SHEEHAN
& GANESH VAIDYANATHAN. Even the most successful business models
erode over time making adaptability the key to thriving under tough
conditions. To avoid getting stuck in a rut, companies must constantly
adapt business models to threats and opportunities. While most managers
consider a host of conventional approaches, there's another way to
approach the problem: Look at value-creation strategies. Here are three
such strategies:
* Industrial efficiency, which creates value by producing
standardized offerings at low cost. Manufacturers and fast-food
restaurants rely on this approach.
* Network services, which creates value by connecting clients to
other people or other parts of the network. Telcos, delivery services
and Internet middlemen such as eBay use this method.
* Knowledge intensive, which creates value by applying customized
expertise to clients' problems. Law firms and medical practices are
prime examples.
networks  orchestration  growth  business_models  strategies  value_creation  law_firms  expertise  eBay  efficiencies  industrial-strength  inequality_of_information  delivery_networks  middlemen  knowledge_intensive  low-cost 
february 2010 by jerryking
The Digitalization of the World - Adam Smith, Esq.
11 January, 2010 | Adam Smith, Esq. | post by Bruce MacEwen.
"Education, as a role for us, should I hope be obvious. We educate our
clients, " and "We don't just rent this knowledge out to our clients, we
should impart it so it becomes their own.
Financial/medical advisers are people to whom we entrust (one hopes) our
every secret, hope, and fear. We should serve the same function. ... We
should be able to provide them with various roadmap's, decision trees,
alternative ways of pursuing their objectives, with lesser and greater
ratios of return and reward. Hands-on personal care? Yes, because there
is no substitute for being there. The more amazing technology and
collaboration-at-a-distance becomes (what the Web, ultimately, is all
about), the more important face to face personal meetings are. The more
people you know "virtually," the more you want to meet them in person."
Bruce_MacEwen  JCK  client_management  inequality_of_information  trustworthiness  knowledge_intensive  management_consulting  indispensable  professional_education  digital_life  teaching  decision_trees  ratios  roadmaps  risk-assessment  strategic_thinking  risks  face2face  personal_meetings  personal_touch  generating_strategic_options  client_development  expertise  digitalization 
january 2010 by jerryking
How to be a packager
Posted by Seth Godin on June 29, 2009

Seth was a book packager which has nothing to do with packaging and a bit more to do with books. It's a great gig and there are useful lessons, because there are dozens of industries just waiting for "packaging"....A book packager is like a movie producer, but for books. You invent an idea, find the content and the authors, find the publisher and manage the process. Book packagers make almanacs, illustrated books, series books for kids and the goofy one-off books you find at the cash register. Seth did everything from a line of almanacs to a book on spot and stain removal. It was terrific fun, and in a good year, a fine business.....there are advantages to this model (and not just for books).

First, the world needs packagers. Packagers that can find isolated assets and connect them in a way that creates value, at the same time that they put in the effort to actually ship the product out of the door. ...
Second, in many industries there are 'publishers' who need more products to sell. Any website with a lot of traffic and a shopping cart can benefit from someone who can assemble products that they can profitably sell. Apple uses the iPhone store to publish apps. It's not a perfect analogy, because they're not taking any financial risk, but the web is now creating a new sort of middleman who can cheaply sell a product to the end user. We also see this with Bed, Bath and Beyond commissioning products for their stores, or Trader Joe's doing it with food items.

Any time you can successfully bring together people who have a reputation or skill with people who sell things, you're creating value. If you find an appropriate scale, it can become a sustainable, profitable business.

The skills you bring to the table are vision, taste and a knack for seeing what's missing. You also have to be a project manager, a salesperson and the voice of reason, the person who brings the entire thing together and to market without it falling apart. Like so many of the businesses that are working now, it doesn't take much cash, it merely takes persistence and drive.

Here are some basic rules of thumb that I learned the hard way:

* It's much easier to sell to an industry that's used to buying. Books were a great place for me to start because book publishers are organized to buy projects from outsiders. It's hard enough to make the sale, way too hard to persuade the person that they should even consider entering the market. (PS stay away from the toy business).
* Earning the trust of the industry is critical. The tenth sale is a thousand times easier than the second one (the first one doesn't count... beginner's luck).
* Developing expertise or assets that are not easily copied is essential, otherwise you're just a middleman.
* Patience in earning the confidence of your suppliers (writers, brands, factories, freelancers) pays off.
* Don't overlook obvious connections. It may be obvious to you that Eddie Bauer should license its name and look to a car company, but it might not be to them.
* Get it in writing. Before you package up an idea for sale to a company that can bring it to market, make sure that all the parties you're representing acknowledge your role on paper.
* As the agent of change, you deserve the lion's share of the revenue, because you're doing most of the work and taking all of the risk. Agenting is a good gig, but that's not what I'm talking about.
* Stick with it. There's a Dip and it's huge. Lots of people start doing things like this, and most of them give up fairly quickly. It might take three or five years before the industry starts to rely on you.
* Work your way up. Don't start by trying to license the Transformers or Fergie. They won't trust a newbie and you wouldn't either.
Seth_Godin  howto  business_development  expertise  one-of-a-kind  licensing  patience  large_companies  voids  vision  persistence  change_agents  overlooked_opportunities  packaging  value_added  non-obvious  latent  hidden  information_synthesis  creating_valuable_content 
july 2009 by jerryking
Easing Back to Work After You've Retired - WSJ.com
OCTOBER 28, 2008 | Wall Street Journal | by SARAH E. NEEDLEMAN.
(1) Leverage your expertise. (2) If need be, pursue a passion. (3)
Start your search now. (4) Get up to date.(5) Tap your network.(6) Hide
any resentment.
Sarah_E._Needleman  retirement  baby_boomers  tips  Second_Acts  passions  expertise 
may 2009 by jerryking

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