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We need to talk about the boys -
MAY 5, 2018 | The Globe and Mail | MARGARET WENTE.

It’s girls who get all the attention these days. But it’s the boys we should be worried about. Boys lag girls in school at every level. They drop out, get in trouble with the law, and become disconnected from the mainstream – sometimes for good.

Jamil Jivani was heading there himself. He grew up in Brampton, Ont....At age 16, he couldn’t read – or didn’t care enough to. He was convinced the system was rigged against him. His role models were gansta rappers. Police officers gave him a hard time. His dad wasn’t in the picture.....Mr. Jivani is now 30. He is a law professor, a graduate of Yale, and an activist for disadvantaged communities. His personal story is the powerful thread running through his new book, Why Young Men: Rage, Race and the Crisis of Identity......He aims to change the conversation from “either/or” to “and also.” “If you’re trying to change the conditions young men grow up in,” he says, “you need to talk about both law enforcement and families.”

He gets pushback saying things like that. “People are used to hearing a certain kind of narrative – the world is unfair, racist, biased, and the primary concern we should have is that these are systems that oppress us – systemic racism, sexism, and so on. It’s amazing how much this passes as a truth.”

Mr. Jivani believes that we can’t address the crisis of young men without talking about families and culture. For boys, fathers are their first line of defence. Without fathers, they may have no positive role models for how to be a man.

“A lot of people in the black community want to talk about fatherlessness,” he says. But we seldom hear from them. The voices you hear are all from one side, and the media seldom seek out any other perspectives.

People censor themselves too. “..... Black Lives Matter makes things worse. “It’s a style of activism that tries to define people – to tell them this is what you’re supposed to think and do because of your identity.” ....“BLM’s approach to activism focuses on having an enemy that must be defeated,” he writes. “It is accusatory at its core.”
Margaret_Wente  fatherhood  parenting  dysfunction  Black_Lives_Matter  African_Canadians  books  crisis  systemic_discrimination  systemic_racism  lawyers  Osgoode  family_breakdown  values  dropouts  achievement_gaps  Yale  activism  economically_disadvantaged  victimhood 
may 2018 by jerryking
J.D. Vance and the Anger of the White Working Class - WSJ
By ALEXANDRA WOLFE
July 29, 2016

J.D. Vance credits his grandparents, religion and his time in the Marine Corps from 2003 to 2007 for helping him to get his life together. Whereas many of the people around him growing up seemed to have a feeling of “learned helplessness” and didn’t think their decisions mattered, he says, he learned the opposite in the Marines: “My decisions did matter and I did have some control over my own life.”.....“In the family life that I grew up in, the way you handled conflict resolution with your spouse or your partner was by screaming and yelling, and if things got really bad, maybe throwing stuff or hitting and punching them,” he says. He only later realized that rather than fighting to win, he should try to solve problems in a relationship. .....“Concretely, I want pastors and church leaders to think about how to build community churches, to keep people engaged, and to worry less about politics and more about how the people in their communities are doing,” he says. “I want parents to fight and scream less, and to recognize how destructive chaos is to their children’s future.”

He thinks that school leaders could help by being more cognizant of what’s going on in students’ home lives. But most of all he wants people to hold themselves responsible for their own conduct and choices. “Those of us who weren’t given every advantage can make better choices, and those choices do have the power to affect our lives,” he says.
books  Yale  working_class  Appalachia  Rust_Belt  poverty  hopelessness  social_mobility  resentments  grievances  values  habits  USMC  helplessness  conflict_resolution  whites  deindustrialization  industrial_Midwest  family_breakdown  underclass  J.D._Vance  faith_leaders  individual_agency  individual_autonomy 
july 2016 by jerryking
Trump nation: An insider’s tour - The Globe and Mail
MARGARET WENTE
The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Jul. 19, 2016

What explains the appeal of Donald Trump? Many pundits have tried to answer this question and fallen short. But J.D. Vance nails it. His stunning new book, Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of A Family and Culture in Crisis, doesn’t even mention Mr. Trump.....It’s misleading to describe the problems of the white working class as an economic crisis. Above all, it is a cultural, spiritual and psychological crisis. The real challenge is not so much the loss of jobs as the loss of values, order and meaning. The yawning chasm between the working and the middle class isn’t about money. It’s about habits and attitudes and a sense of powerlessness.....Mr. Trump is “cultural heroin” – the newest opioid of the masses. He, too, offers an easy escape from problems that seem overwhelming and hopeless.

The issues described in Hillbilly Elegy – low social mobility, the yawning gap between the haves and the have-nots, the waning prospects and social decay experienced by people at the bottom of the ladder – are among the greatest challenges of our times. They can’t be fixed with technocratic or government solutions.
books  Margaret_Wente  working_class  J.D._Vance  Appalachia  Rust_Belt  poverty  Donald_Trump  resentments  grievances  values  habits  social_mobility  hopelessness  helplessness  industrial_Midwest  whites  family_breakdown  underclass 
july 2016 by jerryking
Forcing Black Men Out of Society - NYTimes.com
Devah Pager

This astounding shortfall in black men translates into lower marriage rates, more out-of-wedlock births, a greater risk of poverty for families and, by extension, less stable communities. The missing men should be a source of concern to political leaders and policy makers everywhere.

While the 1.5 million number is startling, it actually understates the severity of the crisis that has befallen African-American men since the collapse of the manufacturing and industrial centers, which was quickly followed by the “war on drugs” and mass imprisonment, which drove up the national prison population more than sevenfold beginning in the 1970s.

In addition to the “missing,” millions more are shut out of society, or are functionally missing, because of the shrinking labor market for low-skilled workers, racial discrimination or sanctions that prevent millions who have criminal convictions from getting all kinds of jobs. At the same time, the surge in imprisonment has further stigmatized blackness itself, so that black men and boys who have never been near a jail now have to fight the presumption of criminality in many aspects of day-to-day life — in encounters with police, in schools, on the streets and on the job....William Julius Wilson wrote in his 1996 book, “When Work Disappears,” for the first time in the 20th century, most adults in many poor inner-city neighborhoods were not working.... Devah Pager wrote in her book, “Marked: Race, Crime and Finding Work in an Era of Mass Incarceration.”
understated  African-Americans  men  criminality  incarceration  racial_disparities  racial_discrimination  books  stereotypes  children  deindustrialization  war_on_drugs  stigmatization  family_breakdown  instability  unemployment  mass_incarceration  joblessness  William_Julius_Wilson  blackness  presumptions 
april 2015 by jerryking
Joseph Epstein: What's Missing in Ferguson, Mo. - WSJ
Aug. 12, 2014 | WSJ | By JOSEPH EPSTEIN.

The black family—the absence of fathers—is the problem. The old dead analyses, the pretty panaceas, are paraded. Yet nothing new is up for discussion. Discussion itself is off the table. Except when Bill Cosby, Thomas Sowell or Shelby Steele and a few others have dared to speak about the pathologies at work—and for doing so, these black figures are castigated.

President Obama, as leader of all the people, is not well positioned for the job of leading the black population that finds itself mired in despond. Someone is needed who commands the respect of his or her people, and the admiration of that vast—I would argue preponderate—number of middle-class whites who understand that progress for blacks means progress for the entire country.

The older generation of civil-rights leaders proved its mettle through physical and moral courage. The enemy was plain—rear-guard segregationists of the old South—and the target was clear: wrongful laws that had to be, and were, rescinded. The morality of the matter was all on these leaders' side. In Little Rock, in Montgomery, in Selma and elsewhere, they put their lives on the line. And they won.

The situation today for a civil-rights leader is not so clear, and in many ways more complex. After the victories half a century ago, civil rights may be a misnomer. Economics and politics and above all culture are now at the heart of the problem. Blacks largely, and inexplicably, remain pledged to a political party whose worn-out ideas have done little for them while claiming much. Slipping off the too-comfortable robes of victimhood is essential, as is discouraging everything in ghetto culture that has dead-end marked all over it.
Ferguson  African-Americans  leaders  leadership  Michael_Brown  '60s  '50s  NAACP  MLK  civil_rights  fatherhood  dysfunction  victimhood  thug_code  family_breakdown 
august 2014 by jerryking
The Family Stories That Bind Us — This Life - NYTimes.com
By BRUCE FEILER
Published: March 15, 2013

The single most important thing you can do for your family may be the simplest of all: develop a strong family narrative..... Psychologists have found that every family has a unifying narrative, he explained, and those narratives take one of three shapes.

First, the ascending family narrative: “Son, when we came to this country, we had nothing. Our family worked. We opened a store. Your grandfather went to high school. Your father went to college. And now you. ...”

Second is the descending narrative: “Sweetheart, we used to have it all. Then we lost everything.”

“The most healthful narrative,” Dr. Duke continued, “is the third one. It’s called the oscillating family narrative: ‘Dear, let me tell you, we’ve had ups and downs in our family. We built a family business. Your grandfather was a pillar of the community. Your mother was on the board of the hospital. But we also had setbacks. You had an uncle who was once arrested. We had a house burn down. Your father lost a job. But no matter what happened, we always stuck together as a family.’ ”

Dr. Duke said that children who have the most self-confidence have what he and Dr. Fivush call a strong “intergenerational self.” They know they belong to something bigger than themselves.... Any number of occasions work to convey this sense of history: holidays, vacations, big family get-togethers, even a ride to the mall. The hokier the family’s tradition, he said, the more likely it is to be passed down. He mentioned his family’s custom of hiding frozen turkeys and canned pumpkin in the bushes during Thanksgiving so grandchildren would have to “hunt for their supper,” like the Pilgrims.
bouncing_back  Communicating_&_Connecting  family  family_breakdown  family_trees  generational_wealth  legacies  mission_statements  narratives  origin_story  resilience  sense-of-belonging  storytelling  the_single_most_important  values 
june 2013 by jerryking
Shall We Overcome? - WSJ.com
October 14, 2005 | WSJ |By CHARLES JOHNSON.

As Louis Farrakhan, Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton prepare for yet another symbolic and substanceless "Million Man March" in Washington, all three have managed to dodge the joke about the first such rally a decade ago (the one in which Mr. Farrakhan dazzled the world with his knowledge of numerology): namely, that black men in America are the only group ever to march in protest of themselves. I'm guessing that the rationale for this weekend's gathering is identical to that of the initial march. It is a lament we have heard in one guise or another for 3½ decades: Our family is in crisis; black men are an endangered species....On the one hand, we are CEOs at AOL Time Warner, American Express and Merrill Lynch; we have served as secretary of state and White House national security adviser; we are mayors, police chiefs, best-selling novelists, MacArthur fellows, Nobel laureates, professors, billionaires, scientists, stockbrokers, engineers,etc...But there is a second, disturbing profile that reveals too high a percentage of black men being AWOL as fathers and husbands; as disappearing from our colleges (UC Berkeley's 2004-05 freshman class had only 108 African-Americans out of 3,600 students, with less than 40 males, and not one black among the 800 entering students in engineering); as graduating from high school with an eighth-grade level of proficiency in math and reading; in prison, on probation or on parole (a third of black men in their 20s). With the HIV infection rate doubling for blacks in the past decade, as well as urban violence, hypertension, social stress and heart disease, the number of black men now trails black women by two million....we are finally willing to acknowledge a national "boy problem" in general, one with devastating consequences for black males in particular...We have already allowed the talent, resources and genius of two generations of young black men who might have enriched this republic to be squandered by gang violence, by poor academic preparation, by the lack of good parenting and by the celebration of an irresponsible "thug life" that is ethically infantile and, predictably, embraced by a notoriously values-challenged entertainment industry....Two things could not be more clear in 2005: First, without strong, self-sacrificing, frugal and industrious fathers as role models, our boys go astray, never learn how to be parents (or men), and perpetuate the dismal situation of single-parent homes run by tired and overworked black women. The black family as a survival unit fails, which leads to the ever-fragile community collapsing along with it. Second, our black predecessors (particularly Booker T. Washington with his corny but unfailingly correct "gospel of the toothbrush") understood from the era of Reconstruction until the late 1960s how indispensable was the black family for sustaining a fight against racism that by its very nature can only be measured in centuries, and for ensuring that our progress toward liberation, personal and political, would not be lost in but a single generation as it now threatens to be.
African-Americans  Al_Sharpton  Booker_T._Washington  crisis  dysfunction  endangered  family_breakdown  fatherhood  frugality  industriousness  Jesse_Jackson  leadership  Louis_Farrakhan  Reconstruction  self-sacrifice  single_parents  thug_code 
august 2012 by jerryking
Problem starts at home
February 7, 2008 | The Caribbean Camera | editorial by Raynier Maharaj.

Any effort to address the failure rate of black students will fail if it does not take the specific home environment into consideration. That’s the key. Educational intervention has to be designed to replace what is lacking at home to be successful.
Remember this: if 40 percent of black students are dropping out of the school system, this means 60 percent are finishing school in the exact same system. Not just that, but children of other minority backgrounds are exceling in same school system where the curriculum also does not address their specific ethnic or cultural needs.
Look, we cannot be afraid to say where real problem is, for that is the only way it can be addressed.
editorials  African_Canadians  Afrocentric  Caribbean  dropouts  dysfunction  family_breakdown  high_schools  parenting  TDSB 
august 2012 by jerryking
Memo to Toronto school board: Are you nuts?
February 2, 2008 | G& M pg. A23 | Jeffrey Simpson.

Given the provincial election results, it is hard to fathom how the Toronto District School Board could be sanctioning "Afrocentric schools" that, although theoretically open to all, are clearly designed for black students only, or almost only. How could it be that having rejected an extension of religiously based schools just a few months ago, the province's largest city will now countenance the creation of racially based ones?

Of course, the board was pressured, as boards often are, by interest groups with a cause - in this case, the theory that inadequate educational achievement can be improved by changing the curriculum. That poor achievement - a 40 per cent dropout rate by black students - is supposed to be lowered if the curriculum is more Afrocentric, which will be quite a trick in mathematics, physics, biology, foreign languages, basic civics, and even the broad sweep of world and Canadian history.
The theory is largely unsound. The much more frequent explanations for poor student achievement, for blacks or any other group, have much less to do with curriculum than factors over which schools have little control: dysfunctional families, troubled neighbourhoods, few role models (absent fathers), poverty, gangs or, in a few immigrant communities, attitudes toward education (especially for females) that are not easily reconciled with mainstream Canadian ones.

All the discourse about inclusiveness, that usually forms a staple of trendy, leftish discourse, has been discarded by the Toronto board in favour of its opposite: membership based overwhelmingly on one characteristic of the human and educational experience - race. As such, it is at profound variance with an important goal of a "public" school system, and should therefore be rejected.
Jeffrey_Simpson  African_Canadians  TDSB  identity_politics  Afrocentric  education  schools  dropouts  public_schools  race  achievement_gaps  family_breakdown  dysfunction  fatherhood  out-of-wedlock 
august 2012 by jerryking
July 19: When society’s broken, and other letters to the editor - The Globe and Mail
july 19 2012 | G&M | David McInnis

Margaret Wente (Broken Families Caused This – July 18) shows courage and candour in naming fatherless families as one of the significant, if not precipitating, reasons for the rise in violence in Toronto’s low-income communities.

During a period of cultural studies in Kingston, Jamaica, a few years ago, I listened as academics discussed the role of “matrifocal” families as a contributing factor to the breakdown of social cohesion in that country. Matrifocal is not to be confused with matriarchal: In the latter, women have the power; in the former, they are a segment of the dispossessed.

Matrifocal societies are ones in which groupings of women, usually mothers with children of various paternities, grandmothers, even great-grandmothers all live under the same roof. They become the dominant model for family life. Males come and go as they choose, and usually contribute little if at all to the family’s maintenance, financially or emotionally.

In such families, not only do male children suffer from the lack of decisive and stable male role models, they are often subject to discrediting messages about and toward males by the female family members.

Small wonder young males growing up in such environments lack direction and are attracted to pseudo-families (gangs) that they falsely assume can provide them with a sense of self-respect.

We must surely find a way of supporting such families and the fragile and emerging egos of this vulnerable element in the population.

David McInnis, Ancaster, Ont.
letters_to_the_editor  directionless  Toronto  dysfunction  violence  Margaret_Wente  parenting  fatherhood  Jamaicans  family_breakdown 
july 2012 by jerryking
Broken families behind the violence -
Jul. 18 2012 | The Globe and Mail |Margaret Wente.

"The single most significant root cause is not guns or crummy housing or racism or inadequate policing or lenient sentencing or lack of jobs or insufficient social programs. It is family and community breakdown. Most especially, it’s absent fathers.

Social programs are essential. But all the social programs in the world can’t make up for family disintegration."
Toronto  violence  Margaret_Wente  dysfunction  family_breakdown  fatherhood  parenting 
july 2012 by jerryking
Two Classes in America, Divided by ‘I Do’ - NYTimes.com
July 14, 2012 | NYT | By JASON DePARLE.

The economic storms of recent years have raised concerns about growing inequality and questions about a core national faith, that even Americans of humble backgrounds have a good chance of getting ahead. Most of the discussion has focused on labor market forces like falling blue-collar wages and lavish Wall Street pay.

But striking changes in family structure have also broadened income gaps and posed new barriers to upward mobility. College-educated Americans like the Faulkners are increasingly likely to marry one another, compounding their growing advantages in pay. Less-educated women like Ms. Schairer, who left college without finishing her degree, are growing less likely to marry at all, raising children on pinched paychecks that come in ones, not twos.

Estimates vary widely, but scholars have said that changes in marriage patterns — as opposed to changes in individual earnings — may account for as much as 40 percent of the growth in certain measures of inequality.
marriage  parenting  family  family_breakdown  income  income_distribution  Matthew_effect  social_classes  college-educated  social_mobility  self-perpetuation  compounded  blue-collar  inequality 
july 2012 by jerryking
Free-Market Socialism - NYTimes.com
By DAVID BROOKS
January 23, 2012

Adam Davidson’s illuminating article in the current issue of The Atlantic is important because it shows the interplay between economic forces (globalization and technology) and social forces (single parenthood and the breakdown of community support). Globalization and technological change increase the demands on workers; social decay makes it harder for them to meet those demands.

Across America, millions of mothers can’t rise because they don’t have adequate support systems as they try to improve their skills. Tens of millions of children have poor life chances because they grow up in disorganized environments that make it hard to acquire the social, organizational and educational skills they will need to become productive workers.

Tens of millions of men have marred life chances because schools are bad at educating boys, because they are not enmeshed in the long-term relationships that instill good habits and because insecure men do stupid and self-destructive things.

Over the past 40 years, women’s wages have risen sharply but, as Michael Greenstone and Adam Looney of the Hamilton Project point out, median incomes of men have dropped 28 percent and male labor force participation rates are down 16 percent. Next time somebody talks to you about wage stagnation, have them break it down by sex. It’s not only globalization and technological change causing this stagnation. It’s the deterioration of the moral and social landscape, especially for men.
children  David_Brooks  disorganization  equality_of_opportunity  family  family_breakdown  gender_gap  globalization  habits  insecurity  joblessness  Obama  relationships  self-destructive  single_parents  social_decay  social_fabric  support_systems  technological_change  underclass  wage_stagnation 
january 2012 by jerryking
Charles Murray on the New American Divide - WSJ.com
JANUARY 21, 2012 | WSJ | By CHARLES MURRAY

The New American Divide
The ideal of an 'American way of life' is fading as the working class falls further away from institutions like marriage and religion and the upper class becomes more isolated. Charles Murray on what's cleaving America, and why.

When Americans used to brag about "the American way of life"—a phrase still in common use in 1960—they were talking about a civic culture that swept an extremely large proportion of Americans of all classes into its embrace. It was a culture encompassing shared experiences of daily life and shared assumptions about central American values involving marriage, honesty, hard work and religiosity.

Over the past 50 years, that common civic culture has unraveled. We have developed a new upper class with advanced educations, often obtained at elite schools, sharing tastes and preferences that set them apart from mainstream America. At the same time, we have developed a new lower class, characterized not by poverty but by withdrawal from America's core cultural institutions.
Charles_Murray  family_breakdown  marriage  religion  social_integration  social_classes  '50s  '60s  values  civics  underclass  cultural_institutions  social_fabric  whites  working_class  fault_lines  hard_work  disintegration  shared_consciousness  upper-income 
january 2012 by jerryking
The need for fathers
Nov 29, 2005| The Globe and Mail pg. A.20 | Carol Richards-Sauer.

Your editorial rightly claims we need to admit that the absence of black fathers contributes to social alienation and violent behaviour among some of their sons. The silence that you decry, however, is not universal.

Recently, I have participated in a town-hall meeting and been in the audience at a round-table discussion about gun violence.

Each time, at least one brave black person from the audience spoke about the issue. Each time, their comments sparked little discussion or self-evaluation.

The topic is rarely addressed because too many community leaders, often self-appointed, have become too focused on blaming forces from without that we can't control as primary or sole causes of black disenfranchisement.

We need to recognize also those forces from within that we can control. We need to characterize ourselves not just as people to whom bad things are done (racism, police brutality, school suspensions etc.) but also as people who make choices that sometimes lead to bad results.

This is necessary to make any true change and to win helpful alliances
ProQuest  fatherhood  family  dysfunction  African_Canadians  disenfranchisement  silence  individual_choice  autonomy  violence  killings  family_breakdown  systemic_discrimination  systemic_racism  beyond_one's_control 
november 2011 by jerryking
Boys without dads
Nov 28, 2005| The Globe and Mail. pg. A.14 | Robert Sciuk.

Finally, someone has had the guts to stand up and speak the truth of the dysfunctional family and the impact that growing up fatherless has upon the children and the teens of both sexes within the black communities (The Many Fatherless Boys In Black Families -- editorial, Nov. 26). While The Globe brings to light the issues, it holds back from stating the obvious fact that our government provides financial incentives to perpetuate the situation.

In Canada, we have strong, state-sponsored financial incentives for unwed teenage mothers to have and to keep their children, even in the absence of a caring nuclear family with which to provide a proper upbringing. Perhaps it's time to adjust the way we help these troubled teens to avoid unwanted conceptions rather than reward them financially for having babies.
ProQuest  letters_to_the_editor  silence  African_Canadians  courage  dysfunction  family  fatherhood  family_breakdown  out-of-wedlock 
november 2011 by jerryking
The many fatherless boys in black families
Nov 26, 2005 | The Globe and Mail. pg. A.26 | Editorials

...Yet as politicians at all three levels and black community leaders scramble for answers to the anarchy, no one has dared talk about the crisis of fatherlessness in the black community.

The silence is inexcusable. Growing up without a father present is now the norm for many black children in Canada, particularly those of Jamaican ancestry. Nearly half of all black children under 14 in Canada have just one parent in the home, compared to slightly under one in five of Canadian children as a whole, census figures from 2001 show. Two in three Jamaican-Canadian children in Toronto are being raised by a single parent...."without strong, self-sacrificing, frugal and industrious fathers as role models, our boys go astray, never learn how to be parents (or men), and perpetuate the dismal situation of single-parent homes run by tired and overworked black women. The black family as a survival unit fails, which leads to the ever-fragile community collapsing along with it."

Poor neighbourhoods in Toronto are crying out for involved fathers. The city's deputy police chief, Keith Forde, who is black, says that invariably when he speaks to predominantly black audiences, two or three mothers approach him to be a Big Brother to their sons. "Nothing hurtsme more in all I do in policing than hav-ing to say no to these parents."

Girls' lives, too, are deeply harmed in fatherless communities. At least a decade ago, Mr. Forde heard from 13- and 14-year-old girls in Rexdale, a dangerous suburb of Toronto, that the boys were insisting: "If you want to be my girlfriend you have to get pregnant for me."...The "survival unit," the black family, is being fatally weakened by the lack of fathers. No matter how helpful social programs, additional police or tougher gun laws may be, they are not the heart of the problem. Reuniting fathers and children should be the top priority. Where are the black fathers, and where are all those who should be calling them to their duty?
African_Canadians  dysfunction  family  silence  JCA  editorials  Toronto  fatherhood  killings  thug_code  family_breakdown  statistics  role_models  Jamaican  violence  say_"no"  Fifty-Cent  parenting 
november 2011 by jerryking
Separating races is not the answer
Oct 12, 2005 |The Globe and Mail. pg. A.22 |

...And why does it want this? Because black youths are shooting one another in the street. Ergo, says the coalition, society is failing black people. The school system, the justice system and the police are failing them. Even multiculturalism is failing them, because it presupposes an open society of equals rather than the real world in which blacks face racism and discrimination. Multiculturalism "doesn't allow us to focus on communities that are in crisis and need a targeted approach," Margaret Parsons, the executive director of the African Canadian Legal Clinic, told a Toronto newspaper. "It does not address racism."

This is quite stunning. Agencies that have been sitting on the sidelines for years have decided within two months that they have the answer. When community activist Dudley Laws declared in the summer of 2001 that at least 94 black youths had been killed by other black youths since 1996, the silence from black community groups was deafening. Now those groups wish to pick up their ball and bat and go home.

Segregating people by race, voluntary or otherwise, is not a solution. It compounds the problems of poverty, exclusion and related pathologies, including rampant fatherlessness and its flip side, out-of-control youth. Creating separate offices and separate schools, and tearing down behavioural codes that apply to everyone, will send a destructive message to everyone: that people do not have to live together, that separate is not so bad as long as it is equal.
ProQuest  in_the_real_world  segregation  African_Canadians  violence  killings  silence  editorials  dysfunction  fatherhood  family_breakdown 
november 2011 by jerryking
Even in the city, it takes a village to raise a child space space
November 29, 2005 | The Globe and Mail – Page A21 | By WILLIAM THORSELL

It was wonderful last week to hear a pastor at another Toronto funeral for a young murdered black man demand that dysfunctional families and communities accept responsibility themselves for the trauma. Stop laying most of the blame on others, he said; face the fact that much of the pathology comes from within the home. The mourners in the church applauded. Many people who might try to help these troubled communities defer, waiting for the communities themselves to speak honestly about their own condition. At the core, it is a matter of values
William_Thorsell  Toronto  African_Canadians  funerals  murders  silence  killings  deaths  dysfunction  poverty  family_breakdown  values  face_the_facts 
november 2011 by jerryking
The 'H' Word - WSJ.com
APRIL 12, 2007 | WSJ | By LIONEL TIGER.

The coercive trend is that ordinary African-American males earn decreasing amounts of money compared to women of their community. They are more accident-prone, more imprisoned and have frailer family lives than women do. Is this why they smoothly call them whores, out of desperate resentment at their own ineffectuality?

There are structural reasons for this beyond the craven crumminess of popular culture. When African and Arab slavers captured people for the New World, they preferred to break up families. Subsequent slave-owning policies sustained that pattern. As well, many slaves were taken from West African societies in which biological mothers and fathers didn't necessary share child caretaking but mother and her brother did. When I lived in Ghana years ago, Christian families with father and mother in the household were called "same muddah same fadduh" in the street. It's likely that continuities persist, as they certainly do in Caribbean societies.

There's also a massive contemporary reason for the invidiousness many African-American men feel in the presence of women -- their relative failure in a school system which broadly favors females. By college age, there is a sharp fall-off of male enrollment in general and of African-American men specifically.
Colleges_&_Universities  slang  basketball  women  family_breakdown  athletes_&_athletics  race  languages  profanity  misogyny  African-Americans  gender_gap  slavery  masculinity  Afro-Caribbeans  disrespect 
november 2011 by jerryking
Family breakdown is one cause of our economic woes - The Globe and Mail
Neil Reynolds | Columnist profile | E-mail
Globe and Mail Update
Published Monday, Oct. 03, 2011
economic_crisis  family  family_breakdown 
october 2011 by jerryking
Op-Ed Contributor - Moynihan’s Message - NYTimes.com
May 28, 2010 | NYT | By JAMES T. PATTERSON. FORTY-FIVE years
ago this month, Assistant Secretary of Labor Daniel Patrick Moynihan
began quietly circulating a report he had recently completed, “The
Negro Family: The Case for National Action” , about the “tangle of
pathology” — out-of-wedlock births, fatherless households — damaging
low-income black families...."Meanwhile Moynihan’s pessimistic
prophecies have come true. In 1965, a quarter of nonwhite births in the
United States were out of wedlock, eight times the proportion among
whites. Today the proportion of nonmarital births among non-Hispanic
blacks exceeds 72 %, compared with a proportion among non-Hispanic
whites of around 28 %.

Only 38 % of black children now live with married parents, compared with
three-quarters of non-Hispanic white children. Many boys in fatherless
families drop out of school, fail to find living-wage work and turn to
idleness or crime. Many girls become poverty-stricken single mothers
themselves. "
op-ed  African-Americans  race_relations  public_policy  Daniel_Moynihan  poverty  fatherhood  out-of-wedlock  family_breakdown  low-income 
may 2010 by jerryking

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