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jerryking : fascination   6

How fascination is a brand’s trump card - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Jun. 19, 2016

She boils it down to seven forms in her book Fascinate and an online diagnostic tool:

Innovation: Such brands revolve around the language of creativity. She lists five adjectives that indicate how to make that advantage come alive: forward-thinking, entrepreneurial, bold, surprising, and visionary. Virgin and Apple are exemplars. Innovation brands open our eyes to new possibilities and change expectations. They invent surprising solutions; they do the opposite of what is expected.

Passion: This is about relationships – building a strong tie between the brand and users. Key adjectives: expressive, optimistic, sensory, warm, and social.

Power: This brand trait speaks of confidence. Key adjectives: assertive, goal-oriented, decisive, purposeful, and opinionated. The Tesla she and her husband recently bought is a power brand – not afraid to have opinions and lead the way. Beyoncé is also a power brand. Power brands need not be overpowering; they can guide gently, even lovingly. But they are confident, pursuing specific goals.

Prestige: This is about excellence. Key adjectives: ambitious, results-oriented, respected, established, and concentrated. It’s a mark of excellence such as Chanel or Louis Vuitton. People shell our big bucks for the prestige of Channel sunglasses, she notes, while Louis Vuitton maintains its standards by shredding unsold bags so they don’t end up sold at discount somewhere. She points to Brooks Brothers and Calvin Klein losing their prestige status as they opt for stores in malls.

Trust: This brand trait expresses the language of stability. Key adjectives: stable, dependable, familiar, comforting, predictable. I

Mystique: this is the language of listening, saying “Mystique reveals less than expected. It provokes questions. These brands know when to talk, and when to be quiet.” Key adjectives: observant, calculated, private, curiosity-provoking, and substantive (e.g. KFC’s 11 secret herbs and spices play to this sense of mystery).

Alert: This is the language of details. Key adjectives: organized, detailed, efficient, precise and methodical. ... Public-health campaigns are alert brands.

To use her shortcut, you need to identify the prime advantage you hold for prospects and customers.
brands  branding  brand_purpose  hacks  Harvey_Schachter  fascination  prestige  trustworthiness  innovation  books  political_power  mystique  forward-thinking 
june 2016 by jerryking
5 Spectacular Marketing Insights From Cirque du Soleil On Customer Intimacy | momentology
By Lisa Lacy, 21st of April 2016 at 14:05 PM.

So how does Cirque du Soleil use get closer to its fans? Here are five marketing insights from Derricks.

1. Be Ready To Ask & Re-Ask Questions

the live entertainment brand isn’t the new kid on the block anymore....undergoing a huge transformation as a result in part of private investment firm TPG acquiring a majority stake last year.

“And what’s fascinating is this inflection point is a chance to re-ask all the questions,” Derricks said. “Everything is back on the table again. Our brand is incredibly strong on stage, but where we’re challenged is what happens beyond the lights and how to interact with you.”

2. Don’t Miss The Marketing Basics
it’s hard for a brand like Cirque du Soleil to simply deliver an app or the like, so “given the crowded market, there’s a lot of basic blocking and tackling as much as finding the next brand new thing. Sometimes it’s about being in the right place at the right time.”

That means Cirque du Soleil capitalizes on traditional out-of-home tactics like taxi toppers and marquis ads, as well as videos in taxis to create awareness and buzz.

3. Have Smaller Conversations & Tell Stories

Derricks said the brand is hearing from its fans that they want to know more about the performers and what goes on behind the scenes.

“Where we’re challenged is selling the concept of the show itself,” Derricks said. “The most radical thing we can do is to be more intimate. I don’t know if we can be louder, but we can be more intimate and [and bring you] behind the curtain, which is a fascinating new adventure for Cirque du Soleil.

4. Bring People To You

Another part of Cirque du Soleil’s marketing strategy involves breaking down the shows into their component parts and connecting with audiences from there....As a result, the brand has begun experimenting with master classes in fields like makeup and dance.

5. Conduct Team Building Activities

What’s more, noting the circus itself has changed drastically as traditional circuses included acts in which performers were related by blood and were therefore very tightly knit, Derricks said Cirque du Soleil, which includes groups of performers without family ties, had to conjure up its own unique methods of fostering trust....As a result, Cirque du Soleil created Spark Sessions, or corporate experiences for networking, business development and/or milestones, to get other companies involved and to help teach what it has since learned about trust and leadership, "
private_equity  TPG  Guy_Laliberté  entrepreneur  fascination  Cirque_du_Soleil  customer_experience  storytelling  customer_intimacy  LBMA  out-of-home  teams  trustworthiness  brands  insights  outreach  live_performances  corporate_training  inflection_points 
april 2016 by jerryking
The Art of Focus
June 2, 2014 | - NYTimes.com | David Brooks.

The way to discover a terrifying longing is to liberate yourself from the self-censoring labels you began to tell yourself over the course of your mis-education. These formulas are stultifying, Phillips argues: “You can only recover your appetite, and appetites, if you can allow yourself to be unknown to yourself. Because the point of knowing oneself is to contain one’s anxieties about appetite.”[JCK: anti the valorization of self-awareness??]

Thus: Focus on the external objects of fascination, not on who you think you are. Find people with overlapping obsessions. Don’t structure your encounters with them the way people do today, through brainstorming sessions (those don’t work) or through conferences with projection screens.

Instead look at the way children learn in groups. They make discoveries alone, but bring their treasures to the group. Then the group crowds around and hashes it out. In conversation, conflict, confusion and uncertainty can be metabolized and digested through somebody else. If the group sets a specific problem for itself, and then sets a tight deadline to come up with answers, the free digression of conversation will provide occasions in which people are surprised by their own minds.
children  constraints  curiosity  David_Brooks  fascination  focus  howto  metabolism  mis-education  passions  self-awareness  self-censorship  self-discovery  sustained_inquiry  uncertainty  unknowns 
june 2014 by jerryking
When it comes to innovation, Canada needs more inquisitive minds
Sept. 11 2013 | The Globe and Mail | by TODD HIRSCH.

There are solutions to Canada’s innovation deficit. The Conference Board of Canada, which prepared the Canadian analysis for the WEF report, makes several smart suggestions. Encouraging more spending on R&D, making better use of advanced technology, and increasing the research linkages between universities and industry all make sense.

But a big part of the problem is our knee-jerk reaction to expect governments to provide the solutions. Need corporate R&D? Ask Ottawa for more tax credits. Lacking venture capital? Insist tax dollars are put into a fund. Want more high tech? Demand provincial governments to spend more on university research.

Good public policies can certainly nudge us in the right direction, but it’s lazy to sit back and wait for government to solve the problem. The truth is that tax credits and research subsidies do not drive innovation. Curiosity drives innovation.

Maybe we’re asking the wrong question. Instead of “what policy can drive innovation?”, we need to ask “how can we become a society of inquisitive individuals?” That’s a more difficult question. It is too simplistic to call for more creativity in the classrooms, but surely strong literacy skills at an early age form the bedrock of curiosity and innovative thinking in adulthood. Children who are encouraged to read, to question, to wonder and to imagine will carry those abilities with them into adulthood.
bottom-up  Todd_Hirsch  economists  innovation  competitiveness_of_nations  Canada  Canadian  WEF  rankings  curiosity  counterintuitive  public_policy  inquisitiveness  literacy  reframing  problem_framing  children  parenting  fascination  asking_the_right_questions  questions 
september 2013 by jerryking
Cirque, Sid Lee team up to create marketing ‘events’ - The Globe and Mail
Jun. 20 2013 | The Globe and Mail | SUSAN KRASHINSKY - MARKETING REPORTER.

Cirque du Soleil is bringing its sense for spectacle to the marketing world, teaming up with Montreal ad agency Sid Lee to launch a branded entertainment company. The joint venture will aim to help brands create experiences that people actually want to watch, listen to, and experience. The joint venture, Sid Lee Entertainment, has been a year and a half in the making, and is an attempt to address a fundamental shift in advertising: away from pushing messages to consumers, and toward creating engaging content....Marketers have been approaching Cirque for years to develop entertainment projects, Mr. Lamarre said, but the company was unable to figure out how to do that without having it conflict with its own brand.

The goal is to create events engaging enough that the brands behind them can sell tickets, Mr. Cesvet said – and to potentially create a new economic model for an industry in flux.

“With advertising, we’re still selling hours,” he said. “What we want to do with this entertainment division is transform the revenue stream of our business … what clients expect from agencies is a lot more complex. You have to do an app, you have to do interactive experiences. I don’t think the value is recognized.”
marketing  branding  brands  Cirque_du_Soleil  Montreal  advertising_agencies  partnerships  joint_ventures  events  event_marketing  ideaCity  product_launches  customer_experience  experiential_marketing  content_creators  live_performances  interactivity  inbound_marketing  entertainment  Sid_Lee  Susan_Krashinsky  creating_valuable_content  fascination 
june 2013 by jerryking
Our fascination with the well-to-do: The money myth;
Feb 12, 2002 | National Post. . pg. SR.1.FR| Deirdre McMurdy

Inherited wealth continues to be relatively rare. About 80% of the country's millionaires represent first-generation wealth.

It's worth noting that it isn't the option-soaked corporate fat cats or the sharp-shooting lawyers who earn the biggest bucks: small business owners and entrepreneurs are four times more likely to be millionaires than those who work for others. They usually do it, furthermore, by retaining a narrow focus on their objective and working extremely hard in low-glamour Old Economy industries like packaging, auto parts or waste disposal.

For the most part, these are frugal folks who live modestly among us and quietly manage their holdings. And that's not just the case in Canada. American sociologists Thomas Stanley and William Danko -- who wrote the 1999 bestseller, The Millionaire Next Door -- found that most millionaires live in homes worth less than $300,000, drive three-year-old U.S.-made cars and never pay more than US$400 for a suit....Within the genus of millionaires, the Bay Street and Wall Street crowds are a distinct species. Those who have coined it in capital markets are a breed apart -- and certainly not representative of most millionaires...But our admiration for wealth is not without its caveats. Some forms and display of money are more inspiring than others. We may aspire to the toys and the lifestyle, but stock-market fortunes are subtly less respected than those garnered through manufacturing or more traditional methods. Accurately or not, the view tends to prevail that market millionaires have been lucky in a game of chance.
ProQuest  high_net_worth  myths  small_business  entrepreneur  owners  capital_markets  unglamorous  modesty  frugality  hard_work  focus  obsessions  industrial_economy  fascination  inheritors  first-generation  founders 
october 2011 by jerryking

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