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jerryking : fast-paced   17

How to Organize Your Kitchen Like a Professional Chef
April 3, 2019 | The New York Times | By Janelle Zara.

“Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat,” by chef Samin Nosrat focuses on those four elements as the pillars of flavor.

An exacting standard of organization......is what keeps fast-paced kitchens running smoothly. “When you have a place for everything, you don’t have to think twice,” she says, because there’s no searching for what you need. “It’s about not having to do the extra work.”....... organize your the cabinets, pantry and drawers in the kitchen — because, “just throwing things in a drawer is selling yourself short.”

All cookware should fall under the four pillars of “prep, cook, serve, store,” and should be divided accordingly. Drawers marked “PREP” includes tools like mixing bowls, mortar and pestle, a scale and a measuring glass, while the “COOK” drawer is full of pots and pans. Items for serving — plates, bowls and glasses — are in the cupboard, her resealable containers are all stacked in a drawer of their own, and never shall the four ever meet.

Sort by flavor and function

“Knowing there’s a zone for everything makes it easier to just go and find,” says Bennett, whose refrigerator contents have been grouped based on flavor profile and function: Asian sauces, American sauces, fruits, vegetables and pickled things each have a designated section. On the countertop, she keeps what she calls her “flavor station,” a reliable wooden bowl stocked with shallots, garlic and red onions. “They’re the raw materials,” she says, “the all-around the basics of good flavor.

Date and label

With all these identical containers, knowing what’s inside and when you bought it is essential. There are, however, no label makers here. “In a professional kitchen, everything is labeled with painters tape,” Bennett says, “but chalkboard paint with a chalkboard pen looks nice, and it’s also easier to read.”

Keep everything in plain sight

Bennett hates the guessing game of pulling knives out of a butcher block to see which is which. She prefers to keep them in a drawer or on a magnetic strip mounted to the wall. “It’s all about visibility and making it easily accessible,” she says. On the same note, she transfers her dry goods to labeled, transparent plastic or glass containers from Restaurant Depot or the Container Store so that she can always see what’s inside, a trick she learned from doing restaurant inventory.

Keep your gadgets to a minimum

The tools in your kitchen don’t need to spark joy, but you should toss the things you never use, no single-utility items.

Don’t keep all your eggs in one basket

Separating like items into different trays and baskets makes them easier to grab on the go: All of Bennett’s vitamins and medicine bottles are in one tray in the fridge; her utensils are divided up by open rectangular boxes in drawers;

Keep shopping bags in the car
That way you’ll never forget to bring them to the market.

Store essentials close at hand
“Counter space is precious real estate,” (jk: finite_resources ) says Bennett, so only the truly necessary basics get to stay there.
books  chefs  fast-paced  finite_resources  GTD  howto  kitchens  self-discipline  self-organization 
april 2019 by jerryking
Brands Invent New Lines for Only Amazon to Sell WSJ
Jan. 25, 2019 | WSJ | By Annie Gasparro and Laura Stevens.

Amazon gets exclusive products, while brands receive faster customer feedback, marketing support and increased sales.......To build a big line of exclusive products on its site, Amazon.com Inc. AMZN 0.95% is pushing other brand manufacturers to do most of the work.

The online retail giant is asking consumer-goods companies to create brands exclusively for Amazon after finding that developing them on its own is too costly and time-consuming.....Amazon’s initiative is the latest example of the e-commerce giant flexing its muscles in order to offer the lowest prices and widest selection, as it seeks to cut into the market share of big-brand manufacturers.....Manufacturers generally benefit from selling their products through a range of retailers. Also, they risk cannibalizing higher-margin sales of their main brands by offering comparable products under different labels. But those entering deals with Amazon view the arrangement as a golden opportunity.

In exchange for creating exclusive products, the brands get help launching their products on Amazon.com, faster customer feedback when testing new products, marketing support, and, of course, revenue from the sales. They also can appear at the top of search results—a big draw given that Amazon’s platform lists an estimated 550 million items......Speed was paramount. “We had to take what would normally be 12 to 24 months of development to 90 days,”....Amazon, on its own, has been quietly adding to its in-house brands in recent years. Analysts estimate the site now offers more than 100. ....Amazon sometimes promotes its own brands higher in search results on its site, like “Amazon’s Choice” and sponsored items, or as default results in voice searches using Amazon’s Alexa virtual assistant.

In-house brands often generate a higher profit margin for retailers, including Amazon, and can draw in customers because they can’t find those brands elsewhere. But developing a new brand and formulating products takes time..... the program offers manufacturers a way to “launch brands and products directly to Amazon customers.”

Amazon is increasingly important for consumer-product manufacturers. It now accounts for roughly half of all sales online,.....Amazon’s program also can be used for “orphan brands” that manufacturers have stopped selling or that never made it to market.....Amazon has no issue going full-court press on private label, and pursuing all these brands. If the quality and pricing architecture don’t fit and they have to pivot, they’ll do so,” said Todd Mitchell, president of Compass Marketing Inc., which works with Amazon. “They’re not limited to the constructs of shelf space.”
accelerated_lifecycles  Amazon  brands  cannibalization  CPG  e-commerce  exclusivity  fast-paced  in-house  manufacturers  new_products  orphan_brands  private_labels  product_development  product_launches  shelf_space  speed 
january 2019 by jerryking
Running Is the Worst Way to Get Fit - Tonic
Nick English

Nov 17 2016

Running is a crappy way to lose fat and an inferior way to boost cardiovascular health, but it's somehow become the most popular exercise on Earth after walking.....It's an incredibly inefficient way to build strength. And as we all know, a strong body is the number one way to prevent injuries, increase metabolism, burn fat, and stay mobile and functional in old age. Folks "do cardio" because they want to burn off their bellies. And running is a bad pick.

"That's usually what the mentality is, that it's a way to get leaner and lose weight, but doing other things outside of running will probably have a better effect at catalyzing that result," he says. Boyce's fat-loss prescription, like that of practically any trainer worth their salt, is compound strength exercises. That means multi-joint movements like the squat, deadlift, overhead press, chin-ups, pull-ups, and push-ups......Studies have consistently shown that weight training and sprinting are more effective than running at targeting belly fat and creating a good hormonal environment for fat loss, meaning better insulin sensitivity, less of the stress hormone cortisol, and more growth hormone and testosterone. ....exercising the heart at a higher intensity is a better way to get the job done. Studies have shown that shorter sessions of anaerobic training, like fast-paced resistance training or sprints, are just as good for heart health as long, drawn-out runs and better at maintaining muscle and increasing aerobic fitness (or VO2 max, if you want to be specific). ...."In many ways, sprinting is safer than running,"....you're going to have more of a fat loss effect from sprinting for the same reasons you get it from weights: You're doing things that require strength, explosiveness, exertion, and intensity, so your muscles are going to have to work a little bit harder, they're going to burn more calories, and you're going to be more metabolic after you finish your workout as well.".....
aerobic  cardiovascular  compound_movements  deadlifts  exercise  fast-paced  fat-burning  fitness  functional_strength  howto  interval_training  high-impact  high-intensity  injury_prevention  metabolic_rate  military_press  pull-ups  running  squats  strength_training 
april 2018 by jerryking
Chaos has its limits even in Donald Trump’s White House
March 23, 2018 | FT | Tim Harford.

The disadvantage of chaos is that it is destabilising; the advantage is that it may destabilise your foes more than you. About four decades ago the US military strategist John Boyd gave a series of influential talks about this idea.

Boyd, whose admirers included senior Republican Dick Cheney and management guru Tom Peters, argued for rapid, confusing manoeuvres, improvised if need be, with the aim of disorienting the enemy. Create enough chaos and you could completely paralyse your foe. If the chaos made life uncomfortable for your own side, no matter. Synchronisation, said Boyd, was not for organisations, but for watches.

This messy, improvised approach to tactics is not entirely new. Sun Tzu, the near-mythical author of The Art of War, declared that “quickness is the essence of war”, but also advised being “without ascertainable shape”. This sounds like the incessant, incomprehensible activity of the Trump White House.....On the battlefield, the master of messy improvisation was the German general Erwin Rommel. He championed swift, energetic action, even if it left his own men scrambling to figure out what was happening.....The same fast-paced seizing of opportunities has worked for some businesses. In the early years of Amazon, Jeff Bezos was clear that he needed to get ahead of rivals such as Barnes & Noble and Toys R Us, even if it meant chaos within Amazon. A more methodical start-up would have been caught and crushed....Of course the more ponderous forces of planning and organisation may reassert themselves in the end....Facebook’s old mantra, “move fast and break things”, suddenly looks less clever. Mark Zuckerberg must now explain exactly what he has broken.....there are limits to improvisation, ambiguity and self-contradictions....On a playing field criss-crossed by technical and legal details, EU negotiator Michel Barnier’s ploddingly careful preparation now seems to be paying dividends.
blitzkrieg  chaos  destabilization  fast-paced  improvisation  leadership  messiness  speed  Sun_Tzu  Tim_Harford  Tom_Peters 
march 2018 by jerryking
Explosion in data ushers in new high-tech era.pdf
December 5, 2016 | Financial Times | Ian Whylie.

However, one of the consequences of the introduction of AI into consulting will be greater clarification of consulting methodologies, predicts Harvey Lewis, Deloitte's UK artificial intelligence lead in technology consulting. There will be repeatable, common approaches that are supported by machines, and then a class of essentially human approaches for dealing with more varied, wide-ranging and uncertain problems........However, AI could also have a significant impact on the way strategy consultants do their job.

“Consulting firms have a lot of intellectual property locked up inside their consultants’ heads, which, if codified and converted into algorithms, can be used by computers instead,” he says. “This will allow computers to work on the repeatable consulting tasks by following prescribed methodologies, while the human consultants are freed to work on those projects where inputs, outputs and outcomes are more uncertain or which require greater creativity, subjectivity, social interaction and perceptiveness or human judgment.”

Clients want us to arrive, ready to load in their data, and provide insights on the first day of the project
Paul Daugherty. If consulting can be codified then the cost of performing certain types of consulting work is likely to fall, says Mr Lewis. This means that consulting can be offered to more organisations, such as start-ups, small and medium enterprises and charities that might not previously have been able to afford consulting services.

“The days of old-style consulting, where the work was centred around a bunch of people mulling over a PowerPoint presentation and analysis for the client, are either dead or dying fast,” says Mr Daugherty. “Increasingly, strategy consulting is moving to fast-paced database analysis, supported by machine learning. Clients will want us to arrive, ready to load in their data, understand the situation and particular dynamics of their business and provide insights on the first day of the project.”
Accenture  artificial_intelligence  automation  data  fast-paced  insights  machine_learning  management_consulting  PowerPoint  situational_awareness  virtual_agents 
april 2017 by jerryking
Why strategy is dead in the water - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Nov. 16 2014

Old line discussions of "strategy" assumed that one's competitors today will be one's competitors forever. It also assumed that companies can control distribution and send out targeted marketing messages to prospects and customers. These days, competition can come at you from all directions – witness, for example, the many companies with which Amazon.com, once just a book seller, competes. Distribution is wild and woolly, and in an era of social media, companies no longer control the messages about their offerings.

“Control and predictability have been greatly diminished,”
Here are seven factors that prevent you from being classically strategic:

1. Incrementalism has been disrupted
2. Outcomes are unpredictable.
3. The past is no longer a predictor.
4. Competitive lines have been dissolved.
5. Information is abundant (i.e. the commoditization_of_information)
6. It hard to forecast value.
7. Fast trumps long-term.
fast-paced  commoditization_of_information  strategy  Michael_Porter  Harvey_Schachter  long-term  unpredictability  GE  IBM  data  information_overload  incrementalism  Amazon  kaleidoscopic 
november 2014 by jerryking
A Makeover for Maps - NYTimes.com
January 6, 2014| NYT | By QUENTIN HARDY.

Eric Rodenbeck is rethinking how data is presented.

“It doesn’t work if it’s not moving,” said Mr. Rodenbeck, the head of Stamen Design, a San Francisco studio that Google, Facebook and Microsoft have all used for help in turning fast-paced digital information into easily understood images. “It doesn’t work if you can’t touch it.”....Nowadays, devices and people are unceasingly uploading all kinds of information about the economy, locations, weather and even what sweater makes them happy. With this flood of data, some believe traditional ways of displaying information do not work well anymore. So there is a demand for Mr. Rodenbeck’s sort of creative thinking about the humble pie chart....charts of fast-changing data reports can provide a clearer idea of the information gathered. The animated changes may be shapes on a map growing and shrinking, colors of bar charts changing or positions of lines rising or fading.
animation  charts  ClearStory  Communicating_&_Connecting  data  design  fast-changing  fast-paced  GE  infographics  mapping  visualization 
january 2014 by jerryking
The Race for Faster Delivery of Everything - Corporate Intelligence - WSJ
December 11, 2013, 7:34 PM

The Race for Faster Delivery of Everything

Article
Comments (2)

Corporate Intelligence HOME PAGE »

By
Tom Gara
delivery  time-based  Amazon  AmazonFresh  supply_chains  UPS  EBay  EBay_Now  shippers  perishables  logistics  delivery_times  speed  fulfillment  same-day  delivery_services  fast-paced 
december 2013 by jerryking
Book Chat on 'The Big Thirst': The Future of Water
May 3, 2011 | NYTimes.com. | By DAVID LEONHARDT. Who reviews,
‘The Big Thirst’: The Future of Water by Charles Fishman, who a longtime
writer for Fast Company magazine. Fishman previously wrote “The
Wal-Mart Effect,” which was an Economist “book of the year” in 2006 and a
finalist in The Financial Times’s awards for best business
book.....Free water — water so cheap you never think about cost when
making water use decisions — is a silent disaster. When something is
free, the message is: It’s unlimited. Free water leads to constant waste
and misallocation.
“We will not, going forward, have water that has all three of those
qualities at the same time: unlimited, unthinkingly inexpensive and
safe.” ....Reminds me of an adage often cited in engineering circles:
"Good, fast, cheap - - pick any two." [JCK: Optimization--the balancing speed, rigor, quality, and agility. Leave perfection to higher powers.]
water  books  water_footprints  future  free  optimization  pricing  resource_allocation  misallocations  waste  inexpensive  engineering  fast  cheap  fast-paced 
may 2011 by jerryking
Randomized testing is fast and cheap, but few seem interested
Lenore Skenazy. Advertising Age. (Midwest region edition). Chicago: Oct 1, 2007. Vol. 78, Iss. 39; pg. 22, 1 pgs
testing  research_methods  randomness  randomized  trial_&_error  fast  cheap  fast-paced 
august 2009 by jerryking

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