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We need to talk about the boys -
MAY 5, 2018 | The Globe and Mail | MARGARET WENTE.

It’s girls who get all the attention these days. But it’s the boys we should be worried about. Boys lag girls in school at every level. They drop out, get in trouble with the law, and become disconnected from the mainstream – sometimes for good.

Jamil Jivani was heading there himself. He grew up in Brampton, Ont....At age 16, he couldn’t read – or didn’t care enough to. He was convinced the system was rigged against him. His role models were gansta rappers. Police officers gave him a hard time. His dad wasn’t in the picture.....Mr. Jivani is now 30. He is a law professor, a graduate of Yale, and an activist for disadvantaged communities. His personal story is the powerful thread running through his new book, Why Young Men: Rage, Race and the Crisis of Identity......He aims to change the conversation from “either/or” to “and also.” “If you’re trying to change the conditions young men grow up in,” he says, “you need to talk about both law enforcement and families.”

He gets pushback saying things like that. “People are used to hearing a certain kind of narrative – the world is unfair, racist, biased, and the primary concern we should have is that these are systems that oppress us – systemic racism, sexism, and so on. It’s amazing how much this passes as a truth.”

Mr. Jivani believes that we can’t address the crisis of young men without talking about families and culture. For boys, fathers are their first line of defence. Without fathers, they may have no positive role models for how to be a man.

“A lot of people in the black community want to talk about fatherlessness,” he says. But we seldom hear from them. The voices you hear are all from one side, and the media seldom seek out any other perspectives.

People censor themselves too. “..... Black Lives Matter makes things worse. “It’s a style of activism that tries to define people – to tell them this is what you’re supposed to think and do because of your identity.” ....“BLM’s approach to activism focuses on having an enemy that must be defeated,” he writes. “It is accusatory at its core.”
Margaret_Wente  fatherhood  parenting  dysfunction  Black_Lives_Matter  African_Canadians  books  crisis  systemic_discrimination  systemic_racism  lawyers  Osgoode  family_breakdown  values  dropouts  achievement_gaps  Yale  activism  economically_disadvantaged  victimhood 
may 2018 by jerryking
Joseph Epstein: What's Missing in Ferguson, Mo. - WSJ
Aug. 12, 2014 | WSJ | By JOSEPH EPSTEIN.

The black family—the absence of fathers—is the problem. The old dead analyses, the pretty panaceas, are paraded. Yet nothing new is up for discussion. Discussion itself is off the table. Except when Bill Cosby, Thomas Sowell or Shelby Steele and a few others have dared to speak about the pathologies at work—and for doing so, these black figures are castigated.

President Obama, as leader of all the people, is not well positioned for the job of leading the black population that finds itself mired in despond. Someone is needed who commands the respect of his or her people, and the admiration of that vast—I would argue preponderate—number of middle-class whites who understand that progress for blacks means progress for the entire country.

The older generation of civil-rights leaders proved its mettle through physical and moral courage. The enemy was plain—rear-guard segregationists of the old South—and the target was clear: wrongful laws that had to be, and were, rescinded. The morality of the matter was all on these leaders' side. In Little Rock, in Montgomery, in Selma and elsewhere, they put their lives on the line. And they won.

The situation today for a civil-rights leader is not so clear, and in many ways more complex. After the victories half a century ago, civil rights may be a misnomer. Economics and politics and above all culture are now at the heart of the problem. Blacks largely, and inexplicably, remain pledged to a political party whose worn-out ideas have done little for them while claiming much. Slipping off the too-comfortable robes of victimhood is essential, as is discouraging everything in ghetto culture that has dead-end marked all over it.
Ferguson  African-Americans  leaders  leadership  Michael_Brown  '60s  '50s  NAACP  MLK  civil_rights  fatherhood  dysfunction  victimhood  thug_code  family_breakdown 
august 2014 by jerryking
Why David Beckham is not a babysitter - The Globe and Mail
COURTNEY SHEA

Special to The Globe and Mail

Published Thursday, Sep. 12 2013,
parenting  fatherhood 
october 2013 by jerryking
My ex doesn’t want to be a father to our child. Should I accept it? - The Globe and Mail
DAVID EDDIE

Special to The Globe and Mail

Published Thursday, Jul. 04 2013

The girl currently taking shape in your uterus will one day want to: 1) know who her father is; 2) spend time with him; 3) have her shoelaces tied, bandages applied, be dropped off and picked up at school, be taken to the doctor and maybe even the emergency room, be hugged and consoled when her pet dies, have things explained – like how flowers grow and who would win in a battle between Godzilla and a T-Rex.
fatherhood  advice  relationships 
july 2013 by jerryking
The dangers of older dads
February 15, 2013 | - Life - Macleans.ca |by Anne Kingston.
fatherhood  aging 
march 2013 by jerryking
Manhood and the Power of Glory
February 26, 1990 | TIME | by Lance Morrow

The movie Glory is, as the historian James M. McPherson has written, the most powerful and historically accurate film ever made about the American Civil War. But Glory, which tells the story of one of the war’s first black regiments, has deeper meaning. The movie addresses the most profound theme of race in America in 1990. Glory is about black manhood and responsibility.
The worst problems of the black underclass today—young black men murdering other young black men; young black males fathering children of females who are virtually children themselves; young blacks lost to crack and heroin—alI connect directly to black manhood and responsibility.
African-Americans  history  movies  Civil_War  masculinity  responsibility  fatherhood  self-help  heroes  inspiration 
september 2012 by jerryking
Father's Age Poses Risk
August 23, 2012 | Reuters via the Globe & Mail | Kate Kelland
parenting  fatherhood  aging  genetics 
august 2012 by jerryking
Guns, gangs and Boston's miracle & Race is the elephant in the room
November 24, 2005 | G& M | Margaret Wente.

Mr. Rivers argues the black middle class has failed its poor by refusing to confront the cultural catastrophes that sweep boys into thug life. First, there's father absence, which leaves them unmoored and out of control. "The failure of black men to discipline their sons has created a generation of de facto orphans." Next, there are the toxic messages of gangsta rap that glorify outlaw life.

Gangsta rap and hip-hop -- which have spread to the slums of Paris,
Brixton and Rio -- moved into the void left by the decline of the
civil-rights movement. "The globalization of thug life," he says, "is
the direct result of the failure of the black middle class to engage
the crisis of the underclass." Tough words....Boston's anti-crime initiative has three legs: prevention, intervention
and enforcement. There are a lot of strategies to intervene with
high-risk kids before they turn into thugs. When it doesn't work, the
reverend is unequivocal about the consequences. "The thugs must be
locked up for a long time. They must be made an example of." One of his
challenges was to bring on board the people he calls the "hug-a-thug
liberals" -- those who see only victims, never criminals.

But he also challenged the law-and-order crowd -- the ones who see a
thug in every kid. All sides had to get past the rhetoric and focus on
what works. By now, there are strong networks among Boston's community
leaders, police and politicians; they regularly work together on crime
issues.
Margaret_Wente  pastors  Toronto  Eugene_Rivers  guns  gangs  Boston  fatherhood  African_Canadians  leadership  hip_hop  churches  voids  middle_class  African-Americans  thug_code  crisis  underclass  race  outlaws  toxic_behaviors 
august 2012 by jerryking
Shall We Overcome? - WSJ.com
October 14, 2005 | WSJ |By CHARLES JOHNSON.

As Louis Farrakhan, Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton prepare for yet another symbolic and substanceless "Million Man March" in Washington, all three have managed to dodge the joke about the first such rally a decade ago (the one in which Mr. Farrakhan dazzled the world with his knowledge of numerology): namely, that black men in America are the only group ever to march in protest of themselves. I'm guessing that the rationale for this weekend's gathering is identical to that of the initial march. It is a lament we have heard in one guise or another for 3½ decades: Our family is in crisis; black men are an endangered species....On the one hand, we are CEOs at AOL Time Warner, American Express and Merrill Lynch; we have served as secretary of state and White House national security adviser; we are mayors, police chiefs, best-selling novelists, MacArthur fellows, Nobel laureates, professors, billionaires, scientists, stockbrokers, engineers,etc...But there is a second, disturbing profile that reveals too high a percentage of black men being AWOL as fathers and husbands; as disappearing from our colleges (UC Berkeley's 2004-05 freshman class had only 108 African-Americans out of 3,600 students, with less than 40 males, and not one black among the 800 entering students in engineering); as graduating from high school with an eighth-grade level of proficiency in math and reading; in prison, on probation or on parole (a third of black men in their 20s). With the HIV infection rate doubling for blacks in the past decade, as well as urban violence, hypertension, social stress and heart disease, the number of black men now trails black women by two million....we are finally willing to acknowledge a national "boy problem" in general, one with devastating consequences for black males in particular...We have already allowed the talent, resources and genius of two generations of young black men who might have enriched this republic to be squandered by gang violence, by poor academic preparation, by the lack of good parenting and by the celebration of an irresponsible "thug life" that is ethically infantile and, predictably, embraced by a notoriously values-challenged entertainment industry....Two things could not be more clear in 2005: First, without strong, self-sacrificing, frugal and industrious fathers as role models, our boys go astray, never learn how to be parents (or men), and perpetuate the dismal situation of single-parent homes run by tired and overworked black women. The black family as a survival unit fails, which leads to the ever-fragile community collapsing along with it. Second, our black predecessors (particularly Booker T. Washington with his corny but unfailingly correct "gospel of the toothbrush") understood from the era of Reconstruction until the late 1960s how indispensable was the black family for sustaining a fight against racism that by its very nature can only be measured in centuries, and for ensuring that our progress toward liberation, personal and political, would not be lost in but a single generation as it now threatens to be.
African-Americans  Al_Sharpton  Booker_T._Washington  crisis  dysfunction  endangered  family_breakdown  fatherhood  frugality  industriousness  Jesse_Jackson  leadership  Louis_Farrakhan  Reconstruction  self-sacrifice  single_parents  thug_code 
august 2012 by jerryking
Memo to Toronto school board: Are you nuts?
February 2, 2008 | G& M pg. A23 | Jeffrey Simpson.

Given the provincial election results, it is hard to fathom how the Toronto District School Board could be sanctioning "Afrocentric schools" that, although theoretically open to all, are clearly designed for black students only, or almost only. How could it be that having rejected an extension of religiously based schools just a few months ago, the province's largest city will now countenance the creation of racially based ones?

Of course, the board was pressured, as boards often are, by interest groups with a cause - in this case, the theory that inadequate educational achievement can be improved by changing the curriculum. That poor achievement - a 40 per cent dropout rate by black students - is supposed to be lowered if the curriculum is more Afrocentric, which will be quite a trick in mathematics, physics, biology, foreign languages, basic civics, and even the broad sweep of world and Canadian history.
The theory is largely unsound. The much more frequent explanations for poor student achievement, for blacks or any other group, have much less to do with curriculum than factors over which schools have little control: dysfunctional families, troubled neighbourhoods, few role models (absent fathers), poverty, gangs or, in a few immigrant communities, attitudes toward education (especially for females) that are not easily reconciled with mainstream Canadian ones.

All the discourse about inclusiveness, that usually forms a staple of trendy, leftish discourse, has been discarded by the Toronto board in favour of its opposite: membership based overwhelmingly on one characteristic of the human and educational experience - race. As such, it is at profound variance with an important goal of a "public" school system, and should therefore be rejected.
Jeffrey_Simpson  African_Canadians  TDSB  identity_politics  Afrocentric  education  schools  dropouts  public_schools  race  achievement_gaps  family_breakdown  dysfunction  fatherhood  out-of-wedlock 
august 2012 by jerryking
July 19: When society’s broken, and other letters to the editor - The Globe and Mail
july 19 2012 | G&M | David McInnis

Margaret Wente (Broken Families Caused This – July 18) shows courage and candour in naming fatherless families as one of the significant, if not precipitating, reasons for the rise in violence in Toronto’s low-income communities.

During a period of cultural studies in Kingston, Jamaica, a few years ago, I listened as academics discussed the role of “matrifocal” families as a contributing factor to the breakdown of social cohesion in that country. Matrifocal is not to be confused with matriarchal: In the latter, women have the power; in the former, they are a segment of the dispossessed.

Matrifocal societies are ones in which groupings of women, usually mothers with children of various paternities, grandmothers, even great-grandmothers all live under the same roof. They become the dominant model for family life. Males come and go as they choose, and usually contribute little if at all to the family’s maintenance, financially or emotionally.

In such families, not only do male children suffer from the lack of decisive and stable male role models, they are often subject to discrediting messages about and toward males by the female family members.

Small wonder young males growing up in such environments lack direction and are attracted to pseudo-families (gangs) that they falsely assume can provide them with a sense of self-respect.

We must surely find a way of supporting such families and the fragile and emerging egos of this vulnerable element in the population.

David McInnis, Ancaster, Ont.
letters_to_the_editor  directionless  Toronto  dysfunction  violence  Margaret_Wente  parenting  fatherhood  Jamaicans  family_breakdown 
july 2012 by jerryking
Broken families behind the violence -
Jul. 18 2012 | The Globe and Mail |Margaret Wente.

"The single most significant root cause is not guns or crummy housing or racism or inadequate policing or lenient sentencing or lack of jobs or insufficient social programs. It is family and community breakdown. Most especially, it’s absent fathers.

Social programs are essential. But all the social programs in the world can’t make up for family disintegration."
Toronto  violence  Margaret_Wente  dysfunction  family_breakdown  fatherhood  parenting 
july 2012 by jerryking
Stephens: A Lesson Before Dying - WSJ.com
December 13, 2011 | WSJ | By BRET STEPHENS.

A Lesson Before Dying
To bemoan illness after a good life seemed ungrateful.

"The good death has increasingly become a myth," wrote the Yale surgeon and bioethicist Sherwin Nuland in his 1993 prize-winning book "How We Die." Dying, in Dr. Nuland's eloquent telling, amounts to "a series of destructive events that involve by their very nature the disintegration of the dying person's humanity." Who can—who would dare—judge a man's worth when his mind and body are being picked bare by disease?...Cancer is a heist culminating in murder....To grow up is to understand that the confidence a parent radiates around his children is rarely the confidence the parent feels. I knew my father well enough to know his various fears and insecurities...All this meant that the diagnosis should have been devastating to him. Yet he never betrayed the slightest sign of fear...Yet my father maintained his usual sangfroid even when it became clear that there would be no getting well. There were no five stages of grief, no bouts of denial, anger, bargaining and depression....Throughout his life my father taught me many lessons: about language, history and philosophy; about ethics, loyalty and love. In the end, he taught me that death cannot destroy the dignity of a dignified man.

Charles J. Stephens, 1937-2011. May his memory be for a blessing.
dying  deaths  hospice  lessons_learned  cancers  Bret_Stephens  fatherhood  grief  palliative_care  end-of-life  books  dignity 
april 2012 by jerryking
The need for fathers
Nov 29, 2005 | The Globe and Mail. pg. A.20 | Wayne Harris.

I am a Jamaican-born Canadian. It disheartens me to see Selwyn Pieters (Boys Without Dads -- letter, Nov. 28) and others claim that "systemic racism" in institutions and schools is "forcing black kids to drop out" and that this is part of the "big picture" of why black youth is in such a quandary.

Your editorial (The Many Fatherless Boys In Black Families -- Nov. 26) says it like it is. The root cause starts in the home, not the community.

If the fathers were there to guide, teach, nurture and lead, then the community would not have to provide focused counselling and intervention.
ProQuest  letters_to_the_editor  fatherhood  dysfunction  family  systemic_discrimination  the_big_picture 
november 2011 by jerryking
The need for fathers
Nov 29, 2005 | The Globe and Mail pg. A.20 |Brian P.H. Green.

First, no neighbourhood in Toronto is a ghetto. Lodz was a ghetto. Warsaw was a ghetto. Jane/Finch or Malvern certainly are not ghettos. A ghetto has a way in, but no way out. The casual over-use of this word exaggerates the hopelessness of some of Toronto's communities. And it debases the memory of people who were truly persecuted.

Second, if you can't get a "decent job" -- in Toronto, no less -- when the economy is operating at "full capacity," then maybe there's an argument for taking personal responsibility, instead of blaming society or institutionalized racism.
African_Canadians  Toronto  fatherhood  ProQuest  personal_responsibility  ghettos  racism  hopelessness  neighbourhoods  blaming_fingerpointing  letters_to_the_editor 
november 2011 by jerryking
The need for fathers
Nov 29, 2005| The Globe and Mail pg. A.20 | Carol Richards-Sauer.

Your editorial rightly claims we need to admit that the absence of black fathers contributes to social alienation and violent behaviour among some of their sons. The silence that you decry, however, is not universal.

Recently, I have participated in a town-hall meeting and been in the audience at a round-table discussion about gun violence.

Each time, at least one brave black person from the audience spoke about the issue. Each time, their comments sparked little discussion or self-evaluation.

The topic is rarely addressed because too many community leaders, often self-appointed, have become too focused on blaming forces from without that we can't control as primary or sole causes of black disenfranchisement.

We need to recognize also those forces from within that we can control. We need to characterize ourselves not just as people to whom bad things are done (racism, police brutality, school suspensions etc.) but also as people who make choices that sometimes lead to bad results.

This is necessary to make any true change and to win helpful alliances
ProQuest  fatherhood  family  dysfunction  African_Canadians  disenfranchisement  silence  individual_choice  autonomy  violence  killings  family_breakdown  systemic_discrimination  systemic_racism  beyond_one's_control 
november 2011 by jerryking
Boys without dads
Nov 28, 2005| The Globe and Mail. pg. A.14 | Robert Sciuk.

Finally, someone has had the guts to stand up and speak the truth of the dysfunctional family and the impact that growing up fatherless has upon the children and the teens of both sexes within the black communities (The Many Fatherless Boys In Black Families -- editorial, Nov. 26). While The Globe brings to light the issues, it holds back from stating the obvious fact that our government provides financial incentives to perpetuate the situation.

In Canada, we have strong, state-sponsored financial incentives for unwed teenage mothers to have and to keep their children, even in the absence of a caring nuclear family with which to provide a proper upbringing. Perhaps it's time to adjust the way we help these troubled teens to avoid unwanted conceptions rather than reward them financially for having babies.
ProQuest  letters_to_the_editor  silence  African_Canadians  courage  dysfunction  family  fatherhood  family_breakdown  out-of-wedlock 
november 2011 by jerryking
Fatherless, yes, but no statistic
Oct 21, 2010 | The Globe and Mail. pg. A.21 | Haille Bailey-Harris.

So one day, she went to the principal's office and the two of them developed a plan, a sort of intervention to ensure I didn't end up as one of those statistics. This was the plan:

Find other role models. My mom made sure I was surrounded by very positive adults, male and female. I'm lucky to have two big brothers, who've been great father figures, and one of my uncles sort of took me under his wing. And I was lucky to have teachers, two women in particular, who really believed in me.

Create a community family. Big Brothers and Big Sisters provided a great big sister for me. We waited for a big brother for a year, but there weren't enough men willing to join up, they said. And now I have a mentor through their program, too. My mom also enrolled me in programs offered by the school, community centre, church and public library that all helped me to feel accepted.

Nurture a love of reading. Instead of banning me from video games, my mom got me games that also required me to read (like Pokemon) and encouraged me to get books (even comics) that interested me. Gradually, I wanted to read books and, eventually, I wanted to read everything, all the time.

Do community service. My mom and I volunteer in our community because giving back makes you feel good about yourself. I've already finished the required volunteer hours to get my high-school diploma by helping kids read at the public library, and working at a homeless shelter and for the Raptors Foundation.

Eventually, with the help of our battle plan, I grew wiser and realized I had great potential (as do all children, no matter the circumstances). I started to try harder in school, I found better friends and became a role model myself.
ProQuest  African_Canadians  high_schools  self-help  statistics  fatherhood  letters_to_the_editor  strategies  family  dysfunction  role_models  parenting  self-reliance 
november 2011 by jerryking
The many fatherless boys in black families
Nov 26, 2005 | The Globe and Mail. pg. A.26 | Editorials

...Yet as politicians at all three levels and black community leaders scramble for answers to the anarchy, no one has dared talk about the crisis of fatherlessness in the black community.

The silence is inexcusable. Growing up without a father present is now the norm for many black children in Canada, particularly those of Jamaican ancestry. Nearly half of all black children under 14 in Canada have just one parent in the home, compared to slightly under one in five of Canadian children as a whole, census figures from 2001 show. Two in three Jamaican-Canadian children in Toronto are being raised by a single parent...."without strong, self-sacrificing, frugal and industrious fathers as role models, our boys go astray, never learn how to be parents (or men), and perpetuate the dismal situation of single-parent homes run by tired and overworked black women. The black family as a survival unit fails, which leads to the ever-fragile community collapsing along with it."

Poor neighbourhoods in Toronto are crying out for involved fathers. The city's deputy police chief, Keith Forde, who is black, says that invariably when he speaks to predominantly black audiences, two or three mothers approach him to be a Big Brother to their sons. "Nothing hurtsme more in all I do in policing than hav-ing to say no to these parents."

Girls' lives, too, are deeply harmed in fatherless communities. At least a decade ago, Mr. Forde heard from 13- and 14-year-old girls in Rexdale, a dangerous suburb of Toronto, that the boys were insisting: "If you want to be my girlfriend you have to get pregnant for me."...The "survival unit," the black family, is being fatally weakened by the lack of fathers. No matter how helpful social programs, additional police or tougher gun laws may be, they are not the heart of the problem. Reuniting fathers and children should be the top priority. Where are the black fathers, and where are all those who should be calling them to their duty?
African_Canadians  dysfunction  family  silence  JCA  editorials  Toronto  fatherhood  killings  thug_code  family_breakdown  statistics  role_models  Jamaican  violence  say_"no"  Fifty-Cent  parenting 
november 2011 by jerryking
Separating races is not the answer
Oct 12, 2005 |The Globe and Mail. pg. A.22 |

...And why does it want this? Because black youths are shooting one another in the street. Ergo, says the coalition, society is failing black people. The school system, the justice system and the police are failing them. Even multiculturalism is failing them, because it presupposes an open society of equals rather than the real world in which blacks face racism and discrimination. Multiculturalism "doesn't allow us to focus on communities that are in crisis and need a targeted approach," Margaret Parsons, the executive director of the African Canadian Legal Clinic, told a Toronto newspaper. "It does not address racism."

This is quite stunning. Agencies that have been sitting on the sidelines for years have decided within two months that they have the answer. When community activist Dudley Laws declared in the summer of 2001 that at least 94 black youths had been killed by other black youths since 1996, the silence from black community groups was deafening. Now those groups wish to pick up their ball and bat and go home.

Segregating people by race, voluntary or otherwise, is not a solution. It compounds the problems of poverty, exclusion and related pathologies, including rampant fatherlessness and its flip side, out-of-control youth. Creating separate offices and separate schools, and tearing down behavioural codes that apply to everyone, will send a destructive message to everyone: that people do not have to live together, that separate is not so bad as long as it is equal.
ProQuest  in_the_real_world  segregation  African_Canadians  violence  killings  silence  editorials  dysfunction  fatherhood  family_breakdown 
november 2011 by jerryking
Papa, Don't Preach: Why Some Fathers Don't Relate to Their Daughters - WSJ.com
NOVEMBER 6, 2003 | WSJ | By JEFFREY ZASLOW.

How do I look at women? Do I comment on their weight or attractiveness? What message does my behavior send to my daughter?

The session, part of a fathering conference sponsored by the group "Dads Empowered," was a reminder that these are precarious times for father/daughter relationships. Reams of research show that girls who are close to their dads are less likely to be promiscuous, develop eating disorders, drop out of school or commit suicide.
fatherhood  parenting  Jeffrey_Zaslow  relationships  daughters 
november 2011 by jerryking
Parenting Advice for Type A Parents Raising Type B Children - WSJ.com
OCTOBER 19, 2011 | WSJ | By SUE SHELLENBARGER.

Ambitious Parents, Mellow Children
Driven Type A's Often Struggle To Raise Type B Kids
personality_types/traits  parenting  children  fatherhood  advice  character_traits 
november 2011 by jerryking
My two girls: A father who has one of his daughters in private school, the other in public, worries about them both, for different reasons
A father who has one of his daughters in private school, the other in public, worries about them both, for different reasons;
Oct 30, 2000 | National Post pg. D.1.FRO |Tad Bradley*

Some parents believe in private schools; others are committed to the public system. Few straddle the fence -- or rather, have their brood on both sides.
ProQuest  fatherhood  parenting  schools  daughters  private_schools 
november 2011 by jerryking
The Secret of Dads' Success - WSJ.com
JUNE 14, 2011 By SUE SHELLENBARGER

How Fathers' Teasing, Tickling, Wrestling Teach Kids to Whine Less and Be More Independent
Sue_Shellenbarger  fatherhood  children  parenting 
june 2011 by jerryking
The Hip-Hop Generation, Raising Up Its Sons
By Natalie Hopkinson
Washington Post Staff Writer
Wednesday, October 18, 2006
parenting  fatherhood  African-Americans  Washington_D.C.  hip_hop 
january 2011 by jerryking
How to Raise Boys That Read (As Much as Girls Do): Not With Gross-Out Books and Video Game Bribes - WSJ.com
SEPTEMBER 24, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By THOMAS SPENCE. Hint: Not with gross-out books and video-game bribes.
masculinity  fatherhood  parenting  howto  reading 
october 2010 by jerryking
The burden and the glory of fatherhood
June 18, 2010 | The Globe and Mail | Will Ferguson
fatherhood  relationships 
june 2010 by jerryking
Bridging the Gap Between Fathers, Adult Daughters
JUNE 15, 2010 | WSJ.com | By ELIZABETH BERNSTEIN. Finding Dad's Softer Side.
fatherhood  relationships  masculinity  daughters 
june 2010 by jerryking
Op-Ed Contributor - Moynihan’s Message - NYTimes.com
May 28, 2010 | NYT | By JAMES T. PATTERSON. FORTY-FIVE years
ago this month, Assistant Secretary of Labor Daniel Patrick Moynihan
began quietly circulating a report he had recently completed, “The
Negro Family: The Case for National Action” , about the “tangle of
pathology” — out-of-wedlock births, fatherless households — damaging
low-income black families...."Meanwhile Moynihan’s pessimistic
prophecies have come true. In 1965, a quarter of nonwhite births in the
United States were out of wedlock, eight times the proportion among
whites. Today the proportion of nonmarital births among non-Hispanic
blacks exceeds 72 %, compared with a proportion among non-Hispanic
whites of around 28 %.

Only 38 % of black children now live with married parents, compared with
three-quarters of non-Hispanic white children. Many boys in fatherless
families drop out of school, fail to find living-wage work and turn to
idleness or crime. Many girls become poverty-stricken single mothers
themselves. "
op-ed  African-Americans  race_relations  public_policy  Daniel_Moynihan  poverty  fatherhood  out-of-wedlock  family_breakdown  low-income 
may 2010 by jerryking
What the Last Meal Taught Him
October 27, 2009 | NYTimes.com | By KIM SEVERSON
For a few great years, Mr. Keller finally knew what it meant to have a
dad around.

“Just to sit with your father and have a beer and smoke a cigar, that is
really important,” Mr. Keller said. "The chef, who has built his
professional life on a devotion to precision, analysis and control that
borders on the obsessive, came to understand in new ways that life is
messy, friends and colleagues say." “It is so important to have
relationships,” he said.
relationships  fatherhood  restauranteurs 
october 2009 by jerryking
Things That Could Have Killed Me - WSJ.com
MAY 22, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | By ROBIN HEMLEY. Things That Could Have Killed Me
It's amazing any of us survived childhood.
fatherhood  parenting  safety  risks  children  childhood 
may 2009 by jerryking
Don't Suffer the Little Children
Friday, September 7, 2007 12:01 A.M. EDTWSJ op-ed by TONY WOODLIEF: A father of four explains the realist approach to parenting.
education  parenting  discipline  fatherhood 
march 2009 by jerryking
Mom's 'Toxic' Behavior May Sabotage Dad's Child Care Attempts
June 17, 2008 WSJ blog post by Sue Shellenbarger looks at
encouragement and criticism from mothers to fathers' level of
engagement.
fatherhood  parenting  Sue_Shellenbarger  toxic_behaviors 
january 2009 by jerryking

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