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jerryking : filmmakers   11

Why black filmmakers go broke
Why black filmmakers go broke?

They will sink 10's of thousands of dollars into a movie, make one really good project. Make a great film. Then go out and try to sell it. Living on a hope and a prayer "Hope Lions Gate buys this movie. hope Warner Bros Studios will buy this movie. Hope Netflix will buy this movie." What happens? No one buys the movie.

Economic systems and markets are like a see-saw: to make a see-saw work, you need two people on the see-saw. Weight on both sides of the see-saw.....A consumer needs a producer and a producer needs a consumer. An investor needs an investee. An employee needs and employer. A renter needs a owner/landlord they can rent from....The black community has an oversupply of consumers, an oversupply of borrowers, an oversupply of spenders an oversupply of employees....We have an undersupply of producers, an undersupply of investors, an undersupply of owners. What effectively occurs is the you will have imbalanced markets.......we might have a lot of producers but not enough people who understands the distribution and monetization aspects of the entertainment industry.....black children aren't trained on distribution aspects, the financing aspects, creating all the different economies that are necessary, or the different markets that are necessary to build an economy: the market for capital, the market for contractors, the market for customers.......The black community has an oversupply of people who make films, but we have an undersupply of those who can provide the distribution and monetization.
African-Americans  bankruptcies  Boyce_Watkins  filmmakers  producer_mindset  two-sided_markets 
7 weeks ago by jerryking
Opinion | Martin Scorsese: I Said Marvel Movies Aren’t Cinema. Let Me Explain. - The New York Times
By Martin Scorsese
Mr. Scorsese is an Academy Award-winning director, writer and producer.

Nov. 4, 2019

Martin Scorsese is an Academy Award-winning director, writer and producer. His new film is “The Irishman.”
Cinema is an art form that brings you the unexpected. In superhero movies, nothing is at risk, a director says.
Many franchise films are made by people of considerable talent and artistry. You can see it on the screen. The fact that the films themselves don’t interest me is a matter of personal taste and temperament. ......For me, for the filmmakers I came to love and respect, for my friends who started making movies around the same time that I did, cinema was about revelation — aesthetic, emotional and spiritual revelation. It was about characters — the complexity of people and their contradictory and sometimes paradoxical natures, the way they can hurt one another and love one another and suddenly come face to face with themselves.

It was about confronting the unexpected on the screen and in the life it dramatized and interpret.....cinema is an.art form. There was some debate about that at the time, so we stood up for cinema as an equal to literature or music or dance.......Many of the elements that define cinema as I know it are there in Marvel pictures. What’s not there is revelation, mystery or genuine emotional danger. Nothing is at risk. The pictures are made to satisfy a specific set of demands, and they are designed as variations on a finite number of themes...When I watch a movie by any of those filmmakers (e.g. Paul Thomas Anderson or Claire Denis or Spike Lee or Ari Aster or Kathryn Bigelow or Wes Anderson ), I know I’m going to see something absolutely new and be taken to unexpected and maybe even unnameable areas of experience. My sense of what is possible in telling stories with moving images and sounds is going to be expanded.......So, you might ask, what’s my problem? Why not just let superhero films and other franchise films be?......In many places around this country and around the world, franchise films are now your primary choice if you want to see something on the big screen. It’s a perilous time in film exhibition, and there are fewer independent theaters than ever.......the fact is that the screens in most multiplexes are crowded with franchise pictures.....It’s a chicken-and-egg issue. If people are given only one kind of thing and endlessly sold only one kind of thing, of course they’re going to want more of that one kind of thing.....In the past 20 years, as we all know, the movie business has changed on all fronts. But the most ominous change has happened stealthily and under cover of night: the gradual but steady elimination of risk. Many films today are perfect products manufactured for immediate consumption. Many of them are well made by teams of talented individuals. All the same, they lack something essential to cinema: the unifying vision of an individual artist. Because, of course, the individual artist is the riskiest factor of all...... certainly not implying that movies should be a subsidized art form, or that they ever were. When the Hollywood studio system was still alive and well, the tension between the artists and the people who ran the business was constant and intense, but it was a productive tension that gave us some of the greatest films ever made....Today, that tension is gone, and there are some in the business with absolute indifference to the very question of art and an attitude toward the history of cinema that is both dismissive and proprietary — a lethal combination. The situation, sadly, is that we now have two separate fields: There’s worldwide audiovisual entertainment, and there’s cinema. They still overlap from time to time, but that’s becoming increasingly rare. And I fear that the financial dominance of one is being used to marginalize and even belittle the existence of the other....For anyone who dreams of making movies or who is just starting out, the situation at this moment is brutal and inhospitable to art
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Yun Kim
VirginiaNov. 5
Times Pick
Product that sells to all ages and backgrounds is difficult to make therefore not risk free. But society only exposed to repeat formula product is indeed at risk.
art  artists  blockbusters  cinema  creativity  cri_de_coeur  films  filmmakers  hits  Hollywood  independent_viewpoints  Martin_Scorsese  Marvel  movies  originality  original_content  risk-taking  sequels  soulless  studios  super-hero  unexpected  
8 weeks ago by jerryking
"Boss: The Black Experience in Business" Explores the History of African American Entrepreneurship Tuesday, April 23 on PBS
Apr 23, 2019 | WNET |

Tying together the past and the present, Boss: The Black Experience in Business explores the inspiring stories of trailblazing African American entrepreneurs and the significant contributions of contemporary business leaders. Stories featured in the film include those of entrepreneur Madam C.J. Walker, publisher John H. Johnson, Motown CEO Berry Gordy, and business pioneer and philanthropist Reginald F. Lewis, among others. The film features new interviews with Vernon Jordan, senior managing director of Lazard, Freres & Co. LLC.; Cathy Hughes, CEO and founder of Urban One; Ursula Burns, former CEO of Xerox and chairman of VEON; Ken Frazier, chairman, president and CEO of Merck & Co., Inc.; Richelieu Dennis, founder, CEO and executive chairman of Sundial Brands; Robert F. Smith, chairman and CEO of Vista Equity Managing Partners, LLC; Earl "Butch" Graves, Jr., CEO of Black Enterprise; and John Rogers, CEO and founder of Ariel Investments.

As a capitalist system emerged in the United States, African Americans found ways to establish profitable businesses in numerous industries, including financial services, retail, beauty, music and media.
African-Americans  Berry_Gordy  C.J.Walker  CEOs  documentaries  entrepreneur  entrepreneurship  filmmakers  founders  historians  history  inspiration  Kenneth_Frazier  Lazard  Merck  moguls  PBS  Reginald_Lewis  Robert_Smith  storytelling  trailblazers  Vernon_Jordan 
april 2019 by jerryking
Julie Dash Made a Movie. Then Hollywood Shut Her Out.
NOV. 18, 2016 | The New York Times| By CARA BUCKLEY.

Julie Dash’s 1991 film, “Daughters of the Dust”, about Gullah women on the Sea Islands off the Southeastern United States in the early 1900s who are tugged north by the Great Migration, celebrated its 25th anniversary....Along with reveling in the film’s restoration, rerelease and Beyoncé-borne attention, Ms. Dash was recently inducted, to her delight, into the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences as part of its effort to diversify its membership....Ms. Dash is still having trouble getting through the door. The agent she eventually ended up with died years ago, and for all her efforts, she said, she has not been able to get another one since.
'90s  African-Americans  anniversaries  Beyoncé  exclusion  filmmakers  films  Great_Migration  Gullah  Hollywood  marginalization  movies  storytelling  trailblazers  women 
november 2016 by jerryking
He wants to put mandatory Canadian movies on TV. Do we want them? - The Globe and Mail
Jan. 24 2013 | The Globe and Mail | STEVE LADURANTAYE AND SIMON HOUPT

Canadians rarely venture to the theatres to see Canadian films. Data for 2012 compiled by the Motion Picture Theatre Associations of Canada show that while the country’s box office pulled in $1.1-billion in 2012, Canadian movies accounted for less than 3 per cent of that, or $25-million. And the country’s broadcasters have largely ignored the movies as well, opting to fill their Canadian-content requirements with dramatic series that are easier to market....
Simon_Houpt  Steve_Ladurantaye  films  Canadian  filmmakers  entrepreneur  CRTC 
january 2013 by jerryking
Filmmaker takes up the trail of The Fruit Hunters
Nov. 15 2012 | The Globe and Mail | MICHAEL POSNER.

David Fairchild is the American agronomist, and acted as a veritable Noah’s ark for tropical fruit. Between the late 19th and early 20th century, he introduced thousands of food crops and plants into North America, including mangoes, nectarines, dates and cherries....Based on his Montreal friend Adam Gollner’s 2008 book of the same name, Chang’s film tracks a disparate fructus personae. These include actor Bill Pullman, whose Hollywood Hills backyard boasts a fecund orchard with more than 100 fruiting plants; Juan Fernando Aguilar, a Honduran breeder trying to find a replacement for the Cavendish banana, a disease-susceptible monoculture on which the $4-billion a year export industry depends; and fruit detective Isabella Dalla Ragione, whose Umbrian Orchard of Forgotten Fruit harbours varieties discovered by analyzing Renaissance-era paintings....For Chang, the fruit hunters are not merely members of an idiosyncratic, juice-stained fringe cult. In an age that has largely severed its connection to nature, they are, he says, “canaries in the coal mine,” reminding us of what could be lost.

From the iconic apple of Eden to the modern day, the story of humankind, he notes, is deeply interwoven with the story of fruit. In some measure, then, his film is an attempt not only to celebrate the joy and fecundity of fruit, but to underscore its importance. “Fruit isn’t just an object that sustains us,” he maintains. “Around it lie culture and history and memory.”
bananas  fruits  documentaries  films  books  filmmakers  monocultures 
december 2012 by jerryking
'Not Fade Away': The Making of a Killer Soundtrack - WSJ.com
December 6, 2012 | WSJ | By STEVE DOUGHERTY.

The Making of a Killer Soundtrack
David Chase, creator of 'The Sopranos,' and Steven Van Zandt, of Bruce Springsteen's E Street Band, used dozens of 'needle drops' in the new movie 'Not Fade Away.' How it stacks up against the great rock-'n'-roll movies of yore....[the] use of recordings by name artists—called "needle drops" in the trade—is nothing new...the first one was in a James Cagney movie. But nearly half a century after the Beatles stormed America, needle drops are still used somewhat sparingly; they are the exception in Hollywood, not the rule. Finding the right songs is time-consuming and expensive. A conventional film score, perhaps with a couple of single songs thrown in, is far easier to construct, and adapt to plot situations.

Steven Spielberg, for one, works almost exclusively with his "Lincoln" composer John Williams. "Songs are great and they can have huge emotional impact, but they're not flexible," says indie film composer Jonathan Hartman. "Scores are like tailored suits—they're custom-made to precisely fit."...It's still a bit daring and subversive to buck this tradition, and some critics are likely to chide Mr. Chase for putting more care into the music than the character development. By filling the soundtrack with nothing but actual songs, he joins a small group of filmmakers who are upending the way movies are made.

"The right song can evoke a time and a sensibility and an entire world," says composer Alan Silvestri, whose collaborations with director Robert Zemeckis ("Forrest Gump," "Flight") avidly mingle rock songs with original music.

Idea for Sunny Zaman
filmmakers  movies  music  rock-'n'-roll  songs  soundtracks  subversion  television 
december 2012 by jerryking
Making Sense of Ambiguous Evidence
September 2008 | HBR | A Conversation with Documentary Filmmaker Errol Morris.

The information that top managers receive is rarely unfiltered. Unpopular opinions are censored. Partisan views are veiled as objective arguments. Honest mistakes are made. The manager is then left to sort it all out and come to a wise conclusion.

Few people know how to get an accurate read on a situation like documentarian Errol Morris. He is the award-winning director of such films as The Thin Blue Line and this year’s Standard Operating Procedure, an exploration of the elusive truth behind the infamous photographs taken at Abu Ghraib prison. The Guardian has ranked him among the world’s top 10 directors, crediting him with “a forensic mind” and “a painter’s eye.”

In this article, Morris talks with HBR’s Lisa Burrell about how he sorts through ambiguous evidence and contradictory views to arrive at the real story. “I don’t believe in the postmodern notion that there are different kinds of truth,” he says. “There is one objective reality, period.” Getting to it requires keeping your mind open to all kinds of evidence—not just the parts that fit with your first impressions or developing opinions—and, often, far more investigation than one would think.

If finding the truth is a matter of perseverance, convincing people of it is something of an art, one with which Morris has had much experience not only as a documentarian but also as a highly sought-after director of TV ads for companies like Apple, Citibank, Adidas, and Toyota. He holds up John Kerry’s 2004 bid for the U.S. presidency as a cautionary tale: Kerry struck voters as inauthentic when he emphasized only his military service and failed to account for his subsequent war protest. Morris would have liked to interview him speaking in his own words—natural, unscripted material—so that his humanity, which seemed to get lost in the campaign, could emerge.
anecdotal  HBR  executive_management  CEOs  contradictions  information  information_flows  evidence_based  objective_reality  information_gaps  authenticity  sense-making  ambiguities  uncertainty  persuasion  forensics  postmodern  filmmakers  documentaries  judgment  cautionary_tales 
august 2012 by jerryking

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