recentpopularlog in

jerryking : films   101

« earlier  
Opinion | Martin Scorsese: I Said Marvel Movies Aren’t Cinema. Let Me Explain. - The New York Times
By Martin Scorsese
Mr. Scorsese is an Academy Award-winning director, writer and producer.

Nov. 4, 2019

Martin Scorsese is an Academy Award-winning director, writer and producer. His new film is “The Irishman.”
Cinema is an art form that brings you the unexpected. In superhero movies, nothing is at risk, a director says.
Many franchise films are made by people of considerable talent and artistry. You can see it on the screen. The fact that the films themselves don’t interest me is a matter of personal taste and temperament. ......For me, for the filmmakers I came to love and respect, for my friends who started making movies around the same time that I did, cinema was about revelation — aesthetic, emotional and spiritual revelation. It was about characters — the complexity of people and their contradictory and sometimes paradoxical natures, the way they can hurt one another and love one another and suddenly come face to face with themselves.

It was about confronting the unexpected on the screen and in the life it dramatized and interpret.....cinema is an.art form. There was some debate about that at the time, so we stood up for cinema as an equal to literature or music or dance.......Many of the elements that define cinema as I know it are there in Marvel pictures. What’s not there is revelation, mystery or genuine emotional danger. Nothing is at risk. The pictures are made to satisfy a specific set of demands, and they are designed as variations on a finite number of themes...When I watch a movie by any of those filmmakers (e.g. Paul Thomas Anderson or Claire Denis or Spike Lee or Ari Aster or Kathryn Bigelow or Wes Anderson ), I know I’m going to see something absolutely new and be taken to unexpected and maybe even unnameable areas of experience. My sense of what is possible in telling stories with moving images and sounds is going to be expanded.......So, you might ask, what’s my problem? Why not just let superhero films and other franchise films be?......In many places around this country and around the world, franchise films are now your primary choice if you want to see something on the big screen. It’s a perilous time in film exhibition, and there are fewer independent theaters than ever.......the fact is that the screens in most multiplexes are crowded with franchise pictures.....It’s a chicken-and-egg issue. If people are given only one kind of thing and endlessly sold only one kind of thing, of course they’re going to want more of that one kind of thing.....In the past 20 years, as we all know, the movie business has changed on all fronts. But the most ominous change has happened stealthily and under cover of night: the gradual but steady elimination of risk. Many films today are perfect products manufactured for immediate consumption. Many of them are well made by teams of talented individuals. All the same, they lack something essential to cinema: the unifying vision of an individual artist. Because, of course, the individual artist is the riskiest factor of all...... certainly not implying that movies should be a subsidized art form, or that they ever were. When the Hollywood studio system was still alive and well, the tension between the artists and the people who ran the business was constant and intense, but it was a productive tension that gave us some of the greatest films ever made....Today, that tension is gone, and there are some in the business with absolute indifference to the very question of art and an attitude toward the history of cinema that is both dismissive and proprietary — a lethal combination. The situation, sadly, is that we now have two separate fields: There’s worldwide audiovisual entertainment, and there’s cinema. They still overlap from time to time, but that’s becoming increasingly rare. And I fear that the financial dominance of one is being used to marginalize and even belittle the existence of the other....For anyone who dreams of making movies or who is just starting out, the situation at this moment is brutal and inhospitable to art
=================================================
Yun Kim
VirginiaNov. 5
Times Pick
Product that sells to all ages and backgrounds is difficult to make therefore not risk free. But society only exposed to repeat formula product is indeed at risk.
art  artists  blockbusters  cinema  creativity  cri_de_coeur  films  filmmakers  hits  Hollywood  independent_viewpoints  Martin_Scorsese  Marvel  movies  originality  original_content  risk-taking  sequels  soulless  studios  super-hero  unexpected  
8 weeks ago by jerryking
Review: A reminder of why 1999 was the best movie year ever
June 22, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | by BARRY HERTZ.

Brian Raftery’s new book, Best. Movie. Year. Ever: How 1999 Blew Up the Big Screen, both an exciting and dubious proposition. We are barely halfway through 2019, and yet I feel as if I’ve already read everything that I could possibly need to know about the cinema of two decades years ago. (Admittedly, this is because I’ve written more than a few thousand words about the era myself. Hey, these pages aren’t going to fill themselves.) By this point, don’t we all know why Galaxy Quest and Go and Run Lola Run and American Beauty are important to today’s cultural firmament, in one way or another? Thankfully, the answer is: no.
'90s  anniversaries  annus_mirabilis  books  book_reviews  cultural_touchpoints  films  generational_touchstones  movies  popular_culture 
june 2019 by jerryking
Opinion | The Best Year of Our Lives
April 6, 2019 | The New York Times | By Ross Douthat.

There’s a theory of human psychology that holds that the time you enter maturity becomes fixed in your mind as a civilizational peak — with everything since a falling-off that conveniently matches your own stagger toward the grave. Thus it doesn’t matter if you came of age in the Great Depression or some other nadir; because you were 18 then, it must have been a golden age......I’ve been thinking about how good we had it lately because we’re 20 years out from 1999, and the cultural press is thick with reminders that it was a pop-culture annus mirabilis — from the premiere of “The Sopranos” that defined a golden age of television, to the yearlong cascade of brilliant movies .....from a Hollywood not yet captive to the superhero era......Widen the aperture a little, so that the “Xennial” cultural era covers 1995 to 2005, and you get everything from the perfection of the sitcom (late “Seinfeld,” season one of “Friends,” the silver age of “The Simpsons,” “Arrested Development”) to the peak of HBO (when “The Wire” and “The Sopranos” and “Deadwood” and “Sex and the City” were all airing). Oh, and those were also the days when George R.R. Martin could publish three “Game of Thrones” novels in five years, inventing all the good parts of the TV show’s plot in an end-of-millennium rush.....cold hard economic data also suggest that ours was a uniquely blessed coming-of-age: a time of low unemployment, surging productivity, strong working-class wage growth — and all without a huge overhang of public and private debt.......a statement about generational experiences, Alter was basically right. If you were born around 1980, you grew up in a space happily between — between eras of existential threat (Cold War/War on Terror, or Cold War/climate change), between foreign policy debacles (Vietnam/Iraq), between epidemics (crack and AIDS/opioids and suicide), and between two different periods of economic stagnation (the ’70s and early Aughts).
'90s  op-ed  Alexandria_Ocasio-Cortez  annus_mirabilis  coming-of-age  cultural_gatekeepers  films  generational_touchstones  golden_age  millennials  movies  noughties  popular_culture  Ross_Douthat  television  shared_consciousness  shared_experiences  The_Wire 
april 2019 by jerryking
James Baldwin: why Beale Street still talks
JANUARY 31, 2019 | Financial Times | by Diana Evans.

The writer’s work remains hugely relevant, particularly in today’s charged racial atmosphere.......James Baldwin never goes out of fashion. This might seem an enviable attribute for a writer to sustain posthumously, if it were not for a predominant reason why. He is a soldier, a comrade. He is a brother-in-arms in a war that doesn’t end. Along with Toni Morrison, Angela Davis, Richard Wright, Nina Simone, Langston Hughes, Maya Angelou and many others, Baldwin is among those foremost in an army of artists and activists who have challenged, fought and assuaged racism and become icons of “black struggle”. As the struggle continues and does not appear to be concluding any time soon, Baldwin’s work is as relevant and prevailing as ever.

The latest landmark in the mounting homage and salutation to Baldwin’s writing is Oscar-winning Barry Jenkins’s adaptation of his penultimate novel If Beale Street Could Talk. Set in Harlem in the 1970s, it’s a mournful, limpid, at times excruciating portrayal of an engaged young couple, Fonny and Tish (played by Stephan James and KiKi Layne), who are separated by Fonny’s sudden incarceration after being falsely accused of rape, leaving Tish to weather pregnancy alone. The film successfully mirrors the book’s oscillating, dreamy atmosphere, capturing the childlike innocence of Tish’s love-soaked narrative voice which accentuates the cruelty of the world around them. She asks, late in the novel, Fonny still hopelessly imprisoned and childbirth close, “What happened here? Surely, this land is cursed.”......No one else articulates with quite the same inexhaustible clarity the outrage, hardship, and fury of existing on the receiving end of race, the sense of being endangered, at best truncated, both physically and spiritually, on a most fundamental level........Born in New York in 1924, Baldwin grew up in poverty in Harlem, the eldest of nine children, and was a gifted Pentecostal preacher prior to being a writer, though he eventually left the church, deeming it a reinforcement of institutionalised modes of oppression. A novelist, essayist, playwright and short-story writer, during his lifetime he became a kind of literary spokesman for the civil rights movement, appearing on the cover of Time magazine in 1963 and forming friendships with Malcolm X, Martin Luther King and Medgar Evers, all of whom were assassinated, which he was trying to address in his unfinished manuscript “Remember This House”, the basis for I Am Not Your Negro.
African-Americans  blackness  films  movies  James_Baldwin  Toni_Morrison  writers 
february 2019 by jerryking
Mattel turns to Hollywood to boost brands
September 7, 2018 | Financial Times | Alistair Gray in New York YESTERDAY.
Mattel  Hollywood  brands  toys  entertainment  films  movies 
september 2018 by jerryking
'We've jumped from one holocaust to another' - The Globe and Mail
STEPHANIE NOLEN LATIN AMERICA BUREAU CHIEF
JOHANNESBURG
PUBLISHED SEPTEMBER 16, 2004
UPDATED APRIL 21, 2018

South african actress Leleti Khumalo who starred in the film Yesterday. She portrayed a Zulu woman who contracts HIV. Very good film. Very sensitive acting. I fell in love with the character. She was also in Hotel Rwanda and played the leading role in Sarafina
actors  South_Africa  films 
august 2018 by jerryking
1999 at the movies: The year of living dangerously - The Globe and Mail
BARRY HERTZ
PUBLISHED FEBRUARY 1, 2018

it is easy to call 1999 the last great year at the movies.

Or at least that's the (convincing) argument made by Canadian television writer Phillip Iscove and his American colleague Kenny Neibart in the pair's new project, Podcast Like It's 1999. The series, available now on iTunes, aims to dissect all 250 major releases of that wonderful, overwhelming year – before, as the pair put it in their debut episode, reality television, HBO and the internet divided everyone's attention.

"It just feels, and has for a while, like a seminal year for movies. It's undeniable,"

.....Which brings up the question of whether 1999 is a true watershed moment, or perhaps more of a generational touchstone for those currently active and wielding power in the creative industries......Raftery’s book is not satisfied until it delivers the definitive portrait of one astounding year at the movies from those who were there, watching along in the dark.
'90s  anniversaries  annus_mirabilis  books  book_reviews  cultural_touchpoints  films  generational_touchstones  golden_age  movies  popular_culture  turning_points 
february 2018 by jerryking
Jake LaMotta, ‘Raging Bull’ in and Out of the Ring, Dies at 95 - The New York Times
By RICHARD GOLDSTEINSEPT. 20, 2017
Continue reading the main storyShare This Page
Share
Tweet
Email
More
Save
obituaries  boxing  '50s  movies  films  '40s 
september 2017 by jerryking
The music industry dances to the beat of TV revenue - The Globe and Mail
September 4, 2017 | Globe and Mail | by JOSH O’KANE.

Toronto's Barenaked Ladies first blew up in the 1990s, when CDs were king. But music sales have since collapsed and streaming services such as Spotify have replaced some, but not nearly all, of that revenue. Bands such as Mr. Robertson's have made up for lost sales in large part by touring. As the fall TV season begins – including The Big Bang Theory's season premiere later this month – getting music on a TV show, film or commercial is becoming an increasingly enticing revenue stream for musicians and the businesses that back them.

As streaming-video platforms keep adding new, original shows and films on top of traditional broadcast channels, the opportunities to license music increase as well. The International Federation of the Phonographic Industry, the recorded music industry's global lobby group, reports that in 2016 Canada brought in $7.8-million (U.S.) in "synchronization" revenue for artists and labels from using music in TV, film, ads and video games.

While that represents less than 1 per cent of total revenue, it's a 32-per-cent increase over the previous year, signalling growing attention for recordings' revenue stream. Meanwhile, SOCAN – which collects royalties for songwriters and music publishers in Canada – says more than a third of all of its royalty revenue comes from TV sources.
films  licensing  music  musicians  music_industry  music_publishing  royalties  streaming  songwriters  television 
september 2017 by jerryking
How to Stream Thousands of Free Movies Using Your Library Card - NYT Watching
By Monica Castillo

More than 200 public library systems in the United States have teamed up with the streaming platform Kanopy to bring some 30,000 movies to library cardholders, free of charge. Kanopy’s emphasis is on documentaries and international films, all of which can be streamed on your computer, through a Roku box or on iOS and Android phone apps.

Be careful not to plan a mega binge-watch just yet, though. Each library imposes its own limit to the number of free movies a single cardholder can watch each month, from three to 20 titles per card, a spokeswoman for Kanopy said. Once they’ve registered their library cards with Kanopy, viewers can keep track of how many movies they have left in the upper right-hand corner of the onscreen interface. The limit for New York Public Library cardholders is 10 free movies a month, while Brooklyn Public Library allows six. Outside of New York, Los Angeles County libraries, for example, have a 10 movie limit.
streaming  free  films  movies  libraries  howto  James_Baldwin 
august 2017 by jerryking
Will Packer Starting Production Company With Backing From Discovery and Universal
JULY 25, 2017 | The New York Times | By MICAH MAIDENBERG.

Mr. Will Packer, 43, is already known as one of the prominent African-American producers in Hollywood, with movies that have grossed more than $1 billion.....best known for his work in movies, including the “Ride Along” films and “The Wedding Ringer.” Now he wants to take aim at consumers using just about every other form of contemporary media.....Packer is starting a new company, Will Packer Media, with backing from Discovery Communications and Universal Pictures. The new entity aims to develop a wide range of programming, from television shows and documentaries to short-form digital videos and advertising campaigns.....telling stories the way that a given story should be told...without having to look at it as one particular type of content for one particular medium.”.....To support the company’s planned advertising campaigns, Will Packer Media bought a marketing and technology company called Narrative that was founded in 2013 by the mogul Russell Simmons and the advertising executive Tricia Clarke-Stone. The company will take the name WP Narrative.

Ms. Clarke-Stone said combining her enterprise with Mr. Packer’s new company would allow for storytelling at the intersection of entertainment, innovation and branding. Working with Mr. Packer, for example, will give her team greater access to Hollywood talent.

“Brands now have a new standard they have to live by,” she said, explaining that they must act as broadcasters, publishers and entertainers. ”That’s the only way to engage with audiences.”
Hollywood  African-Americans  storytelling  movies  packaging  documentaries  short-form  video  producers  television  advertising  Discovery  Universal  films  brands 
july 2017 by jerryking
Amy Pascal’s Hollywood Ending, Complete With Comeback Twist - The New York Times
Article on Amy Pascal, former chair of Sony Pictures, and victim of a 2014 cyberattack that ravaged the company (her private emails were stolen, published online and picked apart by the news media)....In February 2015, Sony ousted her — not over the embarrassing emails, although those didn’t help, but because her movie operation had failed to keep pace with an entertainment industry shift toward franchise films. For Ms. Pascal, this was true devastation: She had been publicly classified as outdated, an executive from another era, when stars and stories mattered more than computer-generated visual effects......Ms. Pascal, a 59-year-old woman in an industry rife with sexism and ageism, seems to have emerged stronger and happier, having reinvented herself as a producer through her company, Pascal Pictures. She will deliver three films to three different studios this year, with more than a dozen more movies on the assembly line. .....“Amy has an extremely sharp film mind, but it’s really her passionate advocacy for scripts and for talent that will make her, I believe, one of the best producers this business has ever seen,” said Thomas E. Rothman, who succeeded Ms. Pascal as Sony’s movie chairman.......the transition from studio mogul to producer is one of the most difficult pivots in show business. Producing requires hustle in a way that running a studio does not. Mustering the necessary self-motivation often proves impossible for older studio royals used to waving a scepter. The best producers put their own egos aside and let others shine. Climbing corporate rungs usually requires the opposite tactic.....“It has been a challenge to be patient and allow myself to learn, especially at this ripe age,” she said. “There’s some discomfort in that. Starting over again means you have to shut up and listen. But you don’t want to because you want to show everybody that you know something even when you don’t.”

She continued: “You think you’re making a movie when you’re a studio executive, but you’re not. The bigger the job you have in Hollywood, the less you are actually connected to the creative process. You’re in budget meetings and talking about head count all day. Your life is reactive.”....
“I never forgot that early training,” Ms. Pascal said. “When in doubt, work.”....when she lost the Sony throne, Ms. Pascal dove into producing as a remedy.....she set up a new office within days of her Sony departure and joined Ivan Reitman to remake “Ghostbusters.” It steered her mind away from self-pity, kept her focused on the future and soothed her bruised ego.....learned about ‘plussing’ ....look at something that is pretty good and figure out how to make it even better.”
bouncing_back  Sony  Hollywood  women  packaging  entertainment_industry  midlife  reinvention  producers  films  movies  studios  self-motivation  female_empowerment  adversity  data_breaches  hustle  cyberattacks  hackers  Second_Acts 
july 2017 by jerryking
Remembering David Livingstone: The man who knew outfits and interviews inside out - The Globe and Mail
BERNADETTE MORRA
Special to The Globe and Mail (includes correction)
Published Friday, Apr. 21, 2017

Many times we would be watching an outfit come down the runway and he would lean over and say something like, “those shoes remind me of that song …” and then he would quote the lyrics of a jazz tune sung by someone I’d never heard of. Long before there was an Internet or easy access to databases, Livingstone was salting his copy with obscure references from films and literature.

Photographers and publicists who sat in on his interviews with designers, actors and models all have stories of the depth and breadth of his knowledge, and how he applied it to the seemingly trite world of fashion.....“He was a massive fan of cinema – he would see one film by a Hungarian director then hunt down their entire library. He was always so well-prepared at interviews, he would form an instant, genuine connection. He put his heart and soul into everything he did.”

Livingstone’s dedication to editorial excellence was both staggering and maddening.....his prose was unbeatable. A diamond cuff bracelet was “as wide as a crosswalk.” The lighting in his overpriced European hotel was so bad, reading his laptop was “like trying to read the marks left by a stick in dirty water.”...“He asked questions no one else asked,” notes Dawn Bellini, senior director of marketing and public relations for Hugo Boss Canada. “Often it was about the button stance or why you had to have something on a lapel. Interviews went way over time. He took much longer than anyone else. But to him details and the back story mattered.”....“He didn’t want to talk about skirt lengths. The conversation was about books and movies. He always made us think. And afterward, we would reflect and grow from that.”....The lack of accuracy and context in today’s 140-character world irked my friend and colleague to no end. But that didn’t stop him from mentoring young talent when he saw potential.
books  cinema  detail_oriented  fashion  films  industry_expertise  inside_out  journalists  journalism  literature  mentoring  movies  obituaries  questions  smart_people  thinking  tributes 
april 2017 by jerryking
Five Studios’ Mission: Winning the Distribution Rights to James Bond -
APRIL 20, 2017 | The New York Times | By BROOKS BARNES.

On Tuesday, for instance, leaders at Sony spent an hour making their case. Kazuo Hirai, the chief executive, helped give the pitch, which emphasized the studio’s deep knowledge of Bond and its ideas for expanding the franchise’s reach. In true Hollywood fashion, Sony gave its presentation inside a sound stage on a recreated set from “Dr. No,” which was released in the United States in 1963 by United Artists and laid the foundation for the entire series.

Also vying for the Bond deal — even though it pays surprisingly little — are Warner Bros., Universal Pictures, 20th Century Fox and Annapurna, an ambitious upstart financed and led by the Oracle heiress Megan Ellison. (Not competing for the business are Paramount, which has been struggling and recently hired a new chairman, and Walt Disney Studios, which has been on a box office hot streak by focusing on its own family film labels.) .....The eagerness to land Bond underscores the continuing strength of the series but also the realities of the modern movie business. As competition for leisure time increases, studios have focused more intently on global blockbusters, and those are in short supply. In some ways, the Bond series was the first to go after a worldwide audience....Under its previous agreement, Sony paid 50 percent of the production costs for “Spectre” — which totaled some $250 million after accounting for government incentives — but received only 25 percent of certain profits, once costs were recouped. Sony also shouldered tens of millions of dollars in marketing and had to give MGM a piece of the profit from non-Bond films Sony had in its own pipeline, including “22 Jump Street.”...Why, then, do studios want to distribute Bond so badly? Bragging rights, mostly. Having a Bond movie on the schedule guarantees at least one hit in a business where there is almost no sure thing.

Bond is gargantuan: The 25 movies have taken in nearly $6 billion at the North American box office, after adjusting for inflation, according to Box Office Mojo. The series has generated billions more in overseas ticket sales, home entertainment revenue, television reruns, marketing partnerships (Omega watches, Aston Martin cars, Gillette razors) and video games.
Hollywood  films  movies  pitches  ideas  idea_generation  studios  blockbusters  product_pipelines  Sony  marketing  upstarts 
april 2017 by jerryking
Samuel L. Jackson and Others on Black British Actors in American Roles - The New York Times
By CHRISTOPHER D. SHEA MARCH 9, 2017
Continue reading the main storyShare This Page
Share
Tweet
Pin
Email
More
actors  Black_British  African-Americans  Hollywood  diversity  visible_minorities  television  films  movies 
march 2017 by jerryking
Julie Dash Made a Movie. Then Hollywood Shut Her Out.
NOV. 18, 2016 | The New York Times| By CARA BUCKLEY.

Julie Dash’s 1991 film, “Daughters of the Dust”, about Gullah women on the Sea Islands off the Southeastern United States in the early 1900s who are tugged north by the Great Migration, celebrated its 25th anniversary....Along with reveling in the film’s restoration, rerelease and Beyoncé-borne attention, Ms. Dash was recently inducted, to her delight, into the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences as part of its effort to diversify its membership....Ms. Dash is still having trouble getting through the door. The agent she eventually ended up with died years ago, and for all her efforts, she said, she has not been able to get another one since.
'90s  African-Americans  anniversaries  Beyoncé  exclusion  filmmakers  films  Great_Migration  Gullah  Hollywood  marginalization  movies  storytelling  trailblazers  women 
november 2016 by jerryking
Moonlight bravely aims to create a fuller picture of black masculinity - The Globe and Mail
ANDRAY DOMISE
Special to The Globe and Mail Last updated: Thursday, Oct. 27, 2016

Moonlight is an undeniably beautiful coming-of-age story told in three parts, adapted from playwright Tarell McCraney’s In Moonlight Black Boys Look Blue. To say it tells the story of a young man growing up is true, and to say this film is a cinematic achievement is also true, but both are understatements. In film, literature and especially the evening news, black masculinity is rarely explored as more than a pathology – gnarled and twisted by crime, poverty and broken families. Through striking visuals and muted, simmering performances from the cast, Jenkins diffracts a broad range of black stereotypes and masterfully reunites them with their missing layers of humanity.
films  TIFF  movies  African-Americans  masculinity  Andray_Domise  Moonlight  coming-of-age  '80s  multidimensional  Miami  stereotypes  think_threes 
october 2016 by jerryking
Exit the Dragon? Kung Fu, Once Central to Hong Kong Life, Is Waning - The New York Times
By CHARLOTTE YANGAUG. 22, 2016
Continue reading the main storyShare This Page
Share
Tweet
Email
More
Bruce_Lee  Hong_Kong  martial_arts  '70s  culture  films  movies  actors 
august 2016 by jerryking
Life’s Work
May 2915 | HBR | Alison Beard

"In the business of storytelling, you're looking for originality in the subject and point of view....which ideas feel authentic and new?"

Can curiosity be taught? Some people have more than others, but to use it as a tool takes work. You have to assault a topic kind of like a scientist and ask endless questions.

"But I still had to do what Lew Wasserman told me: Start manufacturing ideas"

"When people look at you, you have a chance to be a leader"
HBR  Brian_Grazer  curiosity  storytelling  films  movies  ideas  idea_generation  Hollywood  books  Communicating_&_Connecting  self-actualization  creativity  creative_renewal  studios  producers  questions  originality  perspectives  authenticity  pitches  independent_viewpoints  personal_accomplishments  creating_valuable_content  Lew_Wasserman 
april 2016 by jerryking
Steve Golin: Hollywood’s Anonymous Power Player - WSJ
By JOHN JURGENSEN
Feb. 11, 2016

Anonymous Content also assembled the popular dramas “True Detective,” “The Knick” and “Mr. Robot,” which won a Golden Globe for best TV drama on the same night “The Revenant” dominated the film categories.

Though his company is just one hub in Hollywood’s sprawling machinery of financiers, talent agencies, production companies and distributors, Mr. Golin’s career mirrors the changes reshaping the industry......He turned elsewhere, five years ago, when he saw “House of Cards” sold to Netflix as a two-season package complete with movie stars and director David Fincher. He told his staff to double down on its then-slight television business. Anonymous expects to have 11 series on the air this year, including new shows on Netflix, Hulu and cable channels such as Starz. While a movie is usually a one-off for production fees and other revenue, TV shows can keep on giving over numerous seasons.

Anonymous is a rare example of a production company that moved into talent management.
Hollywood  films  movies  entrepreneur  entertainment  entertainment_industry  talent_representation  packaging  prolificacy 
february 2016 by jerryking
Engaging Movie Fans, From Teaser to Premiere - The New York Times
JUNE 14, 2015 | NYT | By MICHAEL CIEPLY.

start-up helps studios cultivate potential audiences’ enthusiasm with early sales of tickets and movie-related products.....Kernel has been quietly burrowing into one of Hollywood’s more persistent problems. That is, how to channel and exploit audience enthusiasm, which can peak with the release of an early trailer (New Line’s “Snakes on a Plane,” from 2006) or a vibrant experience at Comic-Con (“Scott Pilgrim vs. the World,” in 2010), but then dissipate before the movie arrives in theaters...Mr. Harvilicz and Mr. Martinez began Kernel, which now has about a dozen employees. They have turned what started as an itch into a largely web-based business that proposes to help studios engage with fans while capturing dollars from the moment a blockbuster begins to generate excitement, or between releases in a long-running series like the X-Men films, from Fox and Marvel....Prices can reach $1,000, for a premium package that includes two tickets to a yet-to-be-scheduled film premiere. “It’s the second generation of crowdfunding,” said Mr. Harvilicz.

The ticket sales help studios reach theater customers without getting directly into an exhibition business that is barred to them by longstanding legal strictures.
Hollywood  movies  start_ups  films  Kernel  entertainment_industry  studios  superfans  engagement  fan_engagement 
june 2015 by jerryking
An insider's guide to Toronto with Cameron Bailey
SEPTEMBER 27, 2014 | BlogTO | Posted by Alexander Huls.

TIFF's Artistic Director, Cameron Bailey, has a life many a film buff would envy. As a chief orchestrator of the Toronto International Film Festival, Bailey lives and breathes film, and has become one of the festival's most public faces in the process. He has helped makes Toronto one of the epicenters of the film world.

The film professional started out on his path as many do: as a film critic. After realizing his passion for cinema in University, Bailey began reviewing films for outlets like CTV's Canada AM, CBC Radio One, and Now Magazine. At the same time, he also set out on his path as a programmer, contributing his passions to Cinematheque Ontario, the NFB, and, of course, TIFF.

Bailey started programming for TIFF in 1990, and since then - with a lot of hard work - has ascended to greater and greater prominence in the organization. In 2007, he became Festival Co-Director, and as of 2013, he now holds the position of being one of the festival's chief orchestrators as Festival Artistic Director.
African_Canadians  Cameron_Bailey  cultural_criticism  epicenters  films  movies  restaurants  things_to_do  TIFF  Toronto 
september 2014 by jerryking
Bill Cosby Movies
Bill Cosby co-starred with Sidney Poitier in many successful films (Uptown Saturday Night, Let's Do It Again, A Piece of the Action)
Bill_Cosby  '70s  movies  funnies  films  nostalgia  Sidney_Poitier 
september 2014 by jerryking
Richard Attenborough: A giant of British cinema - The Globe and Mail
BENEDICT NIGHTINGALE
The New York Times News Service
Published Monday, Aug. 25 2014
obituaries  actors  United_Kingdom  British  films  movies 
august 2014 by jerryking
The problem with biopics - The Globe and Mail
ALEXANDRA MOLOTKOW
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Aug. 08 2014
James_Brown  biopics  movies  films  soul  Chadwick_Boseman 
august 2014 by jerryking
James Brown and the Making of 'Get On Up' - WSJ
STEVE DOUGHERTY
Updated July 24, 2014

While Mr. Taylor was given the task of finally finding an actor to play James Brown, the two co-producers set about trimming the budget and cutting and shaping the script.

"We had 18 big dance production numbers at one time," says Mr. Grazer. "We always knew that was too many. When Mick and I brought Tate on, we were very practical about it. [The audience] will just burn out if you have 18. Too expensive and they will cease to have impact." The finished film has eight.

They cut scenes and eliminated characters. "There were too many different people, minor characters, record producers and recording engineers moving in and out," says Mr. Jagger. Some were folded into other characters like Ben Bart ( Dan Aykroyd ) the founder of Universal Attractions, the agency that launched Brown.
biopics  music  movies  films  rollingstones  James_Brown  soul  Brian_Grazer  Mick_Jagger  producers  Hollywood  Chadwick_Boseman 
august 2014 by jerryking
globeandmail.com: A builder, literally, of Hollywood North
SUSAN FERRIER MACKAY

Special to The Globe and Mail

January 13, 2014
films  entrepreneur  entertainment  obituaries  Greek 
january 2014 by jerryking
Shoal mates
October 5, 2013 | G&M | Brad Wheeler.

Nestled in the northwest corner of Alabama, the small town of Muscle Shoals was sweet home to a pair of legendary recording studios FAME Studios and Muscle Shoals Sound Studios — and the Swampers, the backing band for some of the greatest music ever recorded. Now Muscle Shoals, a feature-length documentary directed by Greg (Freddy) Camalier showing at TIFF Bell Lightbox starting this weekend, is set to tell the story of FAME Studios's boss Rick Hall and the region‘s deep-soul sound that produced hits for Percy Sledge, Wilson Pickett, Aretha Franklin and other musical icons of the 1960s and The film premiered at the Hot Docs documentary festival in Toronto earlier this year. Brad Wheeler highlights some of the magic moments in Muscle Shoals music
music  music_industry  music_labels  the_South  films  movies  '60s  '70s  Alabama  soul  Wilson_Pickett 
october 2013 by jerryking
Still kicking: the legacy of Bruce Lee -
Sep. 26 2013 |The Globe and Mail | Geoff Pevere.

Enter the Dragon, the kung fu movie that opened six days after Lee’s sudden death of a brain edema in July, 1973, did exactly what the 32-year-old San Francisco-born, Hong Kong-raised trainer and actor had hoped for. By this time 40 years ago, Enter the Dragon was racking up box-office profits around the globe, and Lee had joined that elite club of prematurely deceased movie stars, such as Rudolph Valentino and James Dean, whose demise preceded the release of their final films – a recipe for enduring cult stardom if ever there was....Despite its modest budget, boilerplate James Bond plot and wooden performances, Enter the Dragon altered the world action movie completely.
martial_arts  legacies  films  movies  actors  '70s  Bruce_Lee  celebrities 
september 2013 by jerryking
'Muscle Shoals': Land of 1,000 Hit Records - WSJ.com
September 19, 2013 | WSJ | By MARC MYERS

'Muscle Shoals': Land of 1,000 Hit Records
A New Documentary About the Alabama Music Mecca
music  music_industry  soul  R&B  the_South  movies  films  Jerry_Wexler  '60s  '70s  Alabama  Wilson_Pickett 
september 2013 by jerryking
Fighting Movie Piracy With Spy Cameras and Secret Audio - WSJ.com
August 12, 2013 | WSJ | By ERICH SCHWARTZEL

Spy Cameras, Secret Audio Help Fight Movie Piracy
Two Startups Are Combating Bootlegs In Different Ways
piracy  bootlegs  films  movies  entertainment  start_ups  cameras 
august 2013 by jerryking
Big Star, a great rock band that never won the fame it deserved - The Globe and Mail
Geoff Pevere

Special to The Globe and Mail

Published Thursday, Jul. 04 2013,
music  Stax  movies  films 
july 2013 by jerryking
20 Feet from Stardom: A chronicle of great singers with invisible faces - The Globe and Mail
Liam Lacey

The Globe and Mail

Published Friday, Jul. 05 2013

"Stay cool, stay humble, stay beautiful, and just do the work." A movie about backup singers.
movies  music_industry  singers  films 
july 2013 by jerryking
He wants to put mandatory Canadian movies on TV. Do we want them? - The Globe and Mail
Jan. 24 2013 | The Globe and Mail | STEVE LADURANTAYE AND SIMON HOUPT

Canadians rarely venture to the theatres to see Canadian films. Data for 2012 compiled by the Motion Picture Theatre Associations of Canada show that while the country’s box office pulled in $1.1-billion in 2012, Canadian movies accounted for less than 3 per cent of that, or $25-million. And the country’s broadcasters have largely ignored the movies as well, opting to fill their Canadian-content requirements with dramatic series that are easier to market....
Simon_Houpt  Steve_Ladurantaye  films  Canadian  filmmakers  entrepreneur  CRTC 
january 2013 by jerryking
Filmmaker takes up the trail of The Fruit Hunters
Nov. 15 2012 | The Globe and Mail | MICHAEL POSNER.

David Fairchild is the American agronomist, and acted as a veritable Noah’s ark for tropical fruit. Between the late 19th and early 20th century, he introduced thousands of food crops and plants into North America, including mangoes, nectarines, dates and cherries....Based on his Montreal friend Adam Gollner’s 2008 book of the same name, Chang’s film tracks a disparate fructus personae. These include actor Bill Pullman, whose Hollywood Hills backyard boasts a fecund orchard with more than 100 fruiting plants; Juan Fernando Aguilar, a Honduran breeder trying to find a replacement for the Cavendish banana, a disease-susceptible monoculture on which the $4-billion a year export industry depends; and fruit detective Isabella Dalla Ragione, whose Umbrian Orchard of Forgotten Fruit harbours varieties discovered by analyzing Renaissance-era paintings....For Chang, the fruit hunters are not merely members of an idiosyncratic, juice-stained fringe cult. In an age that has largely severed its connection to nature, they are, he says, “canaries in the coal mine,” reminding us of what could be lost.

From the iconic apple of Eden to the modern day, the story of humankind, he notes, is deeply interwoven with the story of fruit. In some measure, then, his film is an attempt not only to celebrate the joy and fecundity of fruit, but to underscore its importance. “Fruit isn’t just an object that sustains us,” he maintains. “Around it lie culture and history and memory.”
bananas  fruits  documentaries  films  books  filmmakers  monocultures 
december 2012 by jerryking
(1) A Piece of the Action
A Piece of the Action
Uptown Saturday Night
Let's Do it Again
nostalgia  Bill_Cosby  movies  films  blaxploitation 
october 2012 by jerryking
Southern rock's passion and romance is marred by racism and bigotry | Music | The Guardian
Barney Hoskyns
guardian.co.uk, Thursday 5 April 2012

The film, Sweet Home Alabama ,pulls us back to the early 70s peaks of the Allman Brothers Band and Lynyrd Skynyrd, making us reflect anew on what southern rock really meant.

Was Skynyrd's anthem of the same name a song of defiant pride, cocking a snook at Neil Young's Southern Man, or was it something much worse – a strutting defence of old Confederate values, complete with egregious tip of the stetson to segregationist governor George Wallace? Sweet Home Alabama is a stonking song, but Skynyrd's singer Ronnie van Zant wanted it both ways: to be both a bourbon-chugging rock rebel and the Yankee-baiting bigot that Young was decrying.

"Those of us who have characterised [Van Zant] as a misunderstood liberal," wrote Mark Kemp – one of Maycock's interviewees – in his excellent book Dixie Lullaby, "have done so only to placate our own irrational feelings of shame for responding to the passion in his music."

At least the Allman Brothers had an African American – drummer Jai Johnny "Jaimoe" Johanson – in their ranks. Jaimoe had toured with Otis Redding, arguably the key influence on southern rockers from the Allmans to the Black Crowes, and it was Redding's former manager Phil Walden who, in 1969, set up the label most identified with southern rock – Macon, Georgia's Capricorn Records.

"To the young white southerner, black music always appealed more than white pop music," Walden, who died in 2006, told me. "Certainly the Beach Boys' surfing stuff never would have hacked it in the south. It was too white and it just wasn't relevant. The waves weren't too high down here."

Sweet Home Alabama doesn't shirk from the fact that southern rock was born partly of the deepening racial divide that opened up after Martin Luther King's assassination in 1968. "By the end of the decade, a lot of the results of the civil rights era had served to urbanise black music," Walden said in my 1985 interview with him. "A lot of the people we had considered friends were suddenly calling us blue-eyed devils."

The racial cross-pollination of the southern soul era in Alabama hotspot Muscle Shoals (namechecked in Skynyrd's Sweet Home) came to a shuddering halt. Black music got blacker while white southern rock went back to its first principles of melding country music with rhythm'n'blues.

"In a sense the evolution of southern rock was a reactionary attempt to return rock'n'roll to its native soil," suggested the Texan writer Joe Nick Patoski. "After the decline of interest in rockabilly, white rock in the South had taken a back seat to country and western and soul."

Not that anyone anticipated the way southern rock effortlessly flowed into the post-60s counterculture, with the Allmans eventually co-headlining 1973's colossal Watkins Glen festival with the Band and the Grateful Dead. Along with Skynyrd, who were managed by Phil Walden's brother Alan and whose epic Free Bird mourned the death of Duane Allman, a second wave of southern groups – from the Marshall Tucker Band to Black Oak Arkansas – was soon sweeping the US. Some of them even played a modest part in getting peanut-farming Georgia boy Jimmy Carter into the White House.

Carter, of course, was a liberal and 180 degrees from the segregationist politics of Wallace. So indeed were most of the bands that recorded for Capricorn until the label went bust in the late 70s. Yet the supposed "romance" of the south touted by those outfits is hard to separate from the legacy of slavery and racism.

Southern rock has lived on in the very different iterations represented by the Black Crowes, the Georgia Satellites, the Kentucky Headhunters, Kings of Leon, Drive-By Truckers, American Idol contestant Bo Bice, and of course REM (whose Mike Mills reminisces in Sweet Home Alabama about attending Capricorn's annual picnics). The music's ornery fuck-you spirit meanwhile endures in the work of the charming Toby Keith and his kind. Yet the ambiguities of Van Zant's famous lyric are as troubling as ever, despite the apologia for it offered in Maycock's film by self-styled "redneck negress" Kandia Crazy Horse.

White skin, red necks, blue collars, black music: Sweet Home Alabama tells a quintessential American story that never quite ends.

Sweet Home Alabama: The Southern Rock Saga is on BBC4 at 9 pm on Friday 13 April.
'70s  Black_Crowes  films  Lynyrd_Skynyrd  MLK  movies  music  Muscle_Shoals  the_South  country_rock  Southern_rock  bigotry  racism 
september 2012 by jerryking
The emergence of a new global citizen - The Globe and Mail
CHRYSTIA FREELAND

Special to The Globe and Mail

Published Thursday, Aug. 16 2012
Chrystia_Freeland  Hong_Kong  capitalism  films  globalization 
august 2012 by jerryking
Infotrac Newsstand - Document
Postcard from Jamaica
Author(s): Richard Clayton
Source: The Financial Times. (June 9, 2012): News: p8
reggae  Jamaica  music  anniversaries  films  movies 
june 2012 by jerryking
« earlier      
per page:    204080120160

Copy this bookmark:





to read