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jerryking : financial_data   14

London Stock Exchange lays $27bn bet that data are the future
July 28, 2019 | | Financial Times | by Arash Massoudi, Richard Henderson and Richard Blackden.

The London Stock Exchange Group more than 300 years old, is trying to get back on the front foot with a plan for its most ambitious acquisition, one that will shape the direction of the group for years to come. It is the most striking demonstration yet of the charge among exchange operators into the business of supplying the data that is at the heart of markets....The LSE on Friday confirmed a Financial Times report that it was in talks to buy data and trading venue group Refinitiv for $27bn including debt, from a consortium led by private equity group Blackstone. If an agreement is reached for a company best-known for its Eikon desktop terminals, it would transform the LSE into a provider of financial market infrastructure and data with the scale to take on US exchange industry heavyweights Intercontinental Exchange and CME Group as well as Michael Bloomberg’s financial information empire.

“This would be a bold move in the shift among exchanges away from the matching of buyers and sellers and into the business of selling information,” said Kevin McPartland, head of market structure research at consultancy Greenwich Associates. “Data are so valuable and so is having the network of traders and investors to access that data — that’s all at play here.”......The deal would also be a defining moment for the LSE’s chief executive, David Schwimmer, just a year after the relatively unknown former Goldman Sachs banker was parachuted in to steady the ship. Its scale will bring considerable risk in execution alongside the need to convince LSE shareholders that taking on Refinitiv’s $12bn of debt will prove worth it.

Industry analysts see the strategic logic of the deal for the LSE, best known for its UK stock exchange and derivatives clearing house LCH. While revenue from initial public offerings can be more volatile, spending by everyone from asset managers to hedge funds on financial data and the analytical tools to make use of it has been going in one direction. It hit a record $30.5bn last year
.......“What’s happened is exchanges have found it more difficult to find ways of generating revenue in their traditional businesses,” “You can deliver data so easily now, there is voracious appetite from anyone making investment decisions so they can get an edge.”.....As well as winning over LSE shareholders, any deal is likely to face a lengthy period of antitrust approvals.

“There is a wider market concern about exchanges and data vendors combining,” said Niki Beattie, founder of Market Structure Partners. “The global world of data distribution is presided over by a small number of players who have a lot of power.”
asset_management  Blackstone  Bloomberg  bourses  data  financial_data  hedge_funds  inflection_points  IntercontinentalExchange  investors  LSE  mergers_&_acquisitions  M&A  Refinitiv  stockmarkets  Thomson_Reuters  tools  trading_platforms  turning_points  defining_moments 
7 weeks ago by jerryking
Thomson Reuters unit to be renamed Refinitiv after Blackstone deal - The Globe and Mail
LONDON
REUTERS
PUBLISHED 2 DAYS AGO

Thomson Reuters Corp’s Financial and Risk unit, in which U.S. private equity firm Blackstone Group is buying a majority stake, will be renamed Refinitiv once the deal closes, the company said in a statement on Friday.

Blackstone is making its biggest bet since the financial crisis with the $20-billion deal, which pits co-founder Stephen Schwarzman against fellow billionaire and former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg in the financial information industry.

The Thomson Reuters unit provides information and related services to financial services professionals. David Craig, current head of Financial and Risk, will be CEO of Refinitiv, Thomson Reuters said in the statement.

The deal is expected to close in 2018,
Bloomberg  financial_data  Thomson_Reuters  Blackstone  Refinitiv 
july 2018 by jerryking
New partnership aims to create ‘a Bloomberg for private companies’ - The Globe and Mail
JACOB SEREBRIN
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Apr. 27, 2017

The lack of data on Canada’s startup ecosystem is a major problem, says Dan Breznitz, the co-director of the Innovation Policy Lab and the Munk Chair of Innovation Studies at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs. “On anything that has to do with innovation policy, and I would actually say a lot of other growth policies, we have horrible data in Canada,” Mr. Breznitz says.

Gathering more data on accelerators and incubators is a good step, he says......Hockeystick’s platform acts as a tool for private companies to store data and share it with investors and potential investors. That data ranges from investments and sales numbers, to the number of employees and the names of the company’s founders.

Over 10,000 companies are currently using the platform. The new partnership will help the company reach its goal of having data on the majority of private companies in Canada instead of just a fraction, according to Raymond Luk, Hockeystick’s founder and CEO.
partnerships  WLU  start_ups  Kitchener-Waterloo  financial_data  privately_held_companies  innovation_policies 
april 2017 by jerryking
Back to business
October 17/18, 2015 | FT| By Matthew Garrahan and Ben McLannahan
The party to celebrate Bloomberg Businessweek magazine's 85th anniversary took place under a 21,000lb fibreglass model of a blue whale...
Michael_Bloomberg  New_York_City  BusinessWeek  entrepreneur  financial_data  moguls  mayoral  Bloomberg  financial_journalism 
november 2015 by jerryking
As Michael Bloomberg Returns to Run His Firm, Landscape Has Shifted - WSJ
By LUKAS I. ALPERT CONNECT
Sept. 4, 2014

Bloomberg LP now has 321,000 subscribers for its $20,000-a-year terminals, which supply a range of financial information, and is expected to generate $9 billion in revenue this year, making it the largest such data company in the world.

But while Bloomberg's annual growth has averaged nearly 6% over the past five years and it now controls 32% of the financial-data market, the company faces several challenges. Technological advances have made it easier for smaller firms like FactSet and Markit to compete against the financial-data giants, Bloomberg and Thomson Reuters Corp. TRI -0.03%

Also, some U.S. banks have cut back in recent years on the number of data-terminal subscriptions. Bloomberg has targeted emerging markets to sustain its growth. The company is also expanding beyond terminals into data feeds and back-office operations that make up the plumbing of the banking system.

"When [Mr. Bloomberg] left, 90% of their revenue came from their terminal business, but with terminal subscriptions shrinking they have had to grow their business in other directions," said Doug Taylor, an analyst at Burton-Taylor International Consulting.
Michael_Bloomberg  Bloomberg  Second_Acts  back-office  moguls  financial_data  competitive_landscape  data  Wall_Street 
september 2014 by jerryking
Meet Bloomberg's data-driven Daniel Doctoroff
Aug. 09 2013 | The Globe and Mail |JOANNA SLATER.

Mr. Doctoroff’s job, as deputy mayor for economic development, would include rebuilding the site and pushing ahead with projects envisaged in the Olympic bid....Founded by Mr. Bloomberg in 1982, the firm grew into a global juggernaut that disrupted every field it touched, from market data to financial journalism....Mr. Doctoroff had a yen for precision and a belief in the power of data. To eliminate clutter on his desk, he never touches a piece of paper twice. “I either delegate something, I dump it, or I deal with it,”...Mr. Doctoroff’s mission at Bloomberg is twofold. The first is to sell more terminals – a subscription service that costs more than $20,000 (U.S.) a year per person and offers access to an expanding universe of data, analytical tools and news. Last year was a tough one for terminal sales; Wall Street firms continued to shed staff in what Mr. Doctoroff describes as “the fourth year of post-financial crisis adjustment.”

The second task is to lead the company into other areas and make those investments pay off. Bloomberg has launched what it hopes will become indispensable data products for fields like law and government and also for back-office personnel within finance. Then there’s the media business, which includes a news service, television, radio and magazines, among them Bloomberg Businessweek, which was purchased in 2009. Businessweek still isn’t profitable, but it’s losing much less money than it used to. The magazine, like the rest of the news operation, serves another objective in the Bloomberg ecosystem, Mr. Doctoroff said: heightening the firm’s profile so it can attract more market-moving scoops, which in turn helps to sell more terminals....On his career path: I believe we’re all endowed with a very small set of narrow skills that make us unique. You’ve got to find what that is. Most often what you truly understand makes you unique is something that you’re also going to build passion around. For me – and I didn’t really discover this until I was in my 40s, the line that connected the dots … [is] seeing patterns in numbers that enable me to tell a compelling story which helps to solve a problem. So whether it is helping a candidate get elected or doing a road show for a company, getting a project done in New York or hopefully setting a vision for a company, it’s that narrow skill.
New_York_City  Bloomberg  data_driven  precision  CEOs  organizational_culture  Wall_Street  private_equity  digital_media  disruption  privately_held_companies  Michael_Bloomberg  fin-tech  journalism  pattern_recognition  career_paths  gtd  mayoral  Daniel_Doctoroff  storytelling  product_launches  sense-making  leadership  insights  leaders  statistics  persuasion  ratios  analogies  back-office  connecting_the_dots  scoops  financial_journalism  financial_data  special_sauce  non-routine  skills 
august 2013 by jerryking
Google carrying real-time data from EU exchanges
Associated Press | Posted: Tuesday, February 21, 2012

Google's real-time stock quotes are a potential threat to financial information providers such the Thomson Reuters Corp. and Bloomberg L.P., which earn revenue through the provision of up-to-second market data to traders and analysts. Units of Reuters and Bloomberg compete with The Associated Press.

In an email, Google said it was trying to "provide consumers with the best information as quickly as possible."
data  competingonanalytics  stockmarkets  E.U.  Thomson_Reuters  financial_data  Bloomberg  Google  disruption  information  information_flows  real-time 
february 2012 by jerryking
Data markets aren't coming. They're already here
26 January 2011 | O'Reilly Radar| by Julie Steele.

Jud Valeski is cofounder and CEO of Gnip, a social media data provider
that aggregates feeds from sites like Twitter, Facebook, Flickr,
delicious, and others into one API.

Jud will be speaking at Strata next week on a panel titled "What's Mine
is Yours: the Ethics of Big Data Ownership."
Find out more about growing business of data marketplaces at a "Data
Marketplaces" panel with Ian White of Urban Mapping, Peter Marney of
Thomson Reuters and Dennis Yang of Infochimps.

What do you wish more people understood about data markets and/or the
way large datasets can be used?

Jud Valeski: First, data is not free, and there's always someone out
there that wants to buy it. As an end-user, educate yourself with how
the content you create using someone else's service could ultimately be
used by the service-provider. Second, black markets are a real problem,
and just because "everyone else is doing it" doesn't mean it's okay.
markets  data  analytics  massive_data_sets  digital_economy  content_creators  black_markets  Infochimps  Gnip  Thomson_Reuters  commercialization  data_scientists  data_marketplaces  social_data  financial_data 
may 2011 by jerryking
The Media Equation - Reuters Insider, Like YouTube for Traders - NYTimes.com
May 9, 2010 | New York Times | By DAVID CARR. Thomson
Reuters is trying to change television. Its new product, Reuters
Insider, is a Web-based video service that captures myriad streams of
information produced by the company’s reporters and 150 partners. The
service, which will begin Tuesday, is something like a You Tube for the
financially interested, albeit one that is available only to Reuters
subscribers, who pay as much as $2,000 a month.... “People are
increasingly visual, and they expect to access information in that way.
They want to be able to look at a chief executive and see the expression
on the analyst’s face.”
Thomson_Reuters  Reuters_Insider  online_video  financial_data 
may 2010 by jerryking

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