recentpopularlog in

jerryking : financiers   49

Why further financial crises are inevitable
March 19, 2019 | Financial Times | Martin Wolf.

We learnt this month that the US Fed had decided not to raise the countercyclical capital buffer required of banks above its current level of zero, even though the US economy is at a cyclical peak. It also removed “qualitative” grades from its stress tests for American banks, though not for foreign ones. Finally, the Financial Stability Oversight Council, led by Steven Mnuchin, US Treasury secretary, removed the last insurer from its list of “too big to fail” institutions.

These decisions may not endanger the stability of the financial system. But they show that financial regulation is procyclical: it is loosened when it should be tightened and tightened when it should be loosened. We do, in fact, learn from history — and then we forget.....Regulation of banks has tightened since the financial crises of 2007-12. Capital and liquidity requirements are stricter, the “stress test” regime is quite demanding, and efforts have been made to end “too big to fail” by developing the idea of orderly “resolution” of large and complex financial institutions.....Yet complacency is unjustified. Banks remain highly leveraged institutions.....history demonstrates the procyclicality of regulation. Again and again, regulation is relaxed during a boom: indeed, the deregulation often fuels that boom. Then, when the damage has been done and disillusionment sets in, it is tightened again........We can see four reasons why this tends to happen: economic, ideological, political and merely human.

* Economic
Over time the financial system evolves. There is a tendency for risk to migrate out of the best regulated parts of the system to less well regulated parts. Even if regulators have the power and will to keep up, the financial innovation that so often accompanies this makes it hard to do so. The global financial system is complex and adaptable. It is also run by highly motivated people. It is hard for regulators to catch up with the evolution of what we now call “shadow banking”.

* Ideological
the tendency to view this complex system through a simplistic lens. The more powerful the ideology of free markets, the more the authority and power of regulators will tend to erode. Naturally, public confidence in this ideology tends to be strong in booms and weak in busts.

* Political

the financial system controls vast resources and can exert huge influence. In the 2018 US electoral cycle, finance, insurance and real estate (three intertwined sectors) were the largest contributors, covering one-seventh of the total cost. This is a superb example of Mancur Olson’s Logic of Collective Action: concentrated interests override the general one. This is much less true in times of crisis, when the public is enraged and wants to punish bankers. But it is true, again, in normal times.

Borderline or even blatant corruption also emerges: politicians may even demand a share in the wealth created in booms. Since politicians ultimately control regulators, the consequences for the latter, even if they are honest and diligent, are evident.

A significant aspect of the politics is closely linked to regulatory arbitrage: international competition. One jurisdiction tries to attract financial business via “light-touch” regulation; others then follow. This is frequently because their own financiers and financial centres complain bitterly. It is hard to resist the argument that foreigners are cheating.

* Human
There is a human tendency to dismiss long-ago events as irrelevant, to believe This Time is Different and ignore what is not under one’s nose. Much of this can be summarised as “disaster myopia”. The public gives irresponsible policymakers the benefit of the doubt and enjoys the boom. Over time, regulation degrades, as the forces against it strengthen and those in its favour corrode.

The cumulative effect of these efforts is quite clear: regulations erode and that erosion will be exported. This has happened before and will do so again. This time, too, is not different.
boom-to-bust  bubbles  collective_action  complacency  corruption  disaster_myopia  entrenched_interests  economic_downturn  financiers  financial_crises  financial_innovation  financial_regulation  financial_system  historical_amnesia  Mancur_Olson  Martin_Wolf  policymakers  politicians  politics  procyclicality  regulatory_arbitrage  regulation  regulators  stress-tests  This_Time_is_Different  U.S._Federal_Reserve 
march 2019 by jerryking
How a Former Canadian Spy Helps Wall Street Mavens Think Smarter
Nov. 11, 2018 | The New York Times | By Landon Thomas Jr.

* “Atomic Habits: An Easy and Proven Way to Build Good Habits and Break Bad Ones,” by James Clear. “
* “The Laws of Human Nature,” an examination of human behavior that draws on examples of historical figures by Robert Greene.
* “Thinking in Bets: Making Smarter Bets When you Don’t Have All the Cards” by Annie Duke,
* “On Grand Strategy,” an assessment of the decisions of notable historical leaders by the Pulitzer Prize-winning biographer John Lewis Gaddis

Shane Parrish has become an unlikely guru for Wall Street. His self-improvement strategies appeal to his overachieving audience in elite finance, Silicon Valley and professional sports.....Shane Parrish is a former cybersecurity expert at Canada’s top intelligence agency and an occasional blogger when he noticed something curious about his modest readership six years ago: 80 percent of his followers worked on Wall Street......The blog was meant to be a method of self-improvement, however, his lonely riffs — on how learning deeply, thinking widely and reading books strategically could improve decision-making skills — had found an eager audience among hedge fund titans and mutual fund executives, many of whom were still licking their wounds after the financial crisis.

His website, Farnam Street, urges visitors to “Upgrade Yourself.” In saying as much, Mr. Parrish is promoting strategies of rigorous self-betterment as opposed to classic self-help fare — which appeals to his overachieving audience in elite finance, Silicon Valley and professional sports. ....Today, Mr. Parrish’s community of striving financiers is clamoring for more of him. That means calling on him to present his thoughts and book ideas to employees and clients; attending his regular reading and think weeks in Hawaii, Paris and the Bahamas; and in some cases hiring him to be their personal decision-making coach......“We are trying to get people to ask themselves better questions and reflect. If you can do that, you will be better able to handle the speed and variety of changing environments.”....Parrish advises investors, to disconnect from the noise and to read deeply......Few Wall Street obsessions surpass the pursuit of an investment edge. In an earlier era, before computers and the internet, this advantage was largely brain power. Today, information is just another commodity. And the edge belongs to algorithms, data sets and funds that track indexes and countless other investment themes.......“It is all about habits,” “Setting goals is easy — but without good habits you are not getting there.”......“Every world-class investor is questioning right now how they can improve,” he said. “So, in a machine-driven age where everything is driven by speed, perhaps the edge is judgment, time and perspective.”
books  brainpower  Charlie_Munger  coaching  commoditization_of_information  CSE  cyber_security  decision_making  deep_learning  disconnecting  financiers  gurus  habits  investors  judgment  life_long_learning  overachievers  personal_coaching  perspectives  Pulitzer_Prize  questions  reading  reflections  self-betterment  self-improvement  slight_edge  smart_people  Wall_Street  Warren_Buffett 
november 2018 by jerryking
Howard Marks, the ultimate bargain hunter
October 17, 2018 | Financial Times | Javier Espinoza.

Howard Marks : “I have a high degree of creativity,” he says. "In order to outdo others you have to think differently from others. If you don’t, how can you expect to have superior results?” His new book is Mastering the Market Cycle.

Mr Marks is the founder of Oaktree Capital Management. Based in Los Angeles, it is one of the world’s most prominent value investors. He makes money by finding situations where he can buy low, especially distressed assets, then sell high.

Today, market conditions mean Mr Marks faces as strong a challenge as ever: trying to sniff out bargains when valuations are steep, debt is cheap and competition fierce.

In 2015 Oaktree raised about $12bn for its distressed-debt fund. It was the second-largest amount in its history......The veteran financier regards delaying gratification as key to success. Like Warren Buffett, he believes waiting for the right investments is an important part of the process.

He often cites Hyman Minsky, the US economist famous for his work on bubbles and crashes....as Minsky would say, ‘there are always cycles’.”

“There are up-cycles with too much enthusiasm, too little discipline and too little risk aversion," he says. "And there are down-cycles when the economy does less well, corporations do less well, security prices fall and there is too much risk aversion, too much fear.”

“A quote said to have been uttered by Mark Twain is: ‘History does not repeat but it does rhyme’. The point is that the patterns of cycles do repeat and the details – the amplitude, the timing, the duration, the speed and the reasons – are different from cycle to cycle but the themes that underlie the causes of cycles are similar from one to the next.”

 
bargain_hunting  books  boom-to-bust  creativity  distressed_debt  economic_cycles  financiers  founders  Howard_Marks  investors  Mark_Twain  moguls  money_management  investment_research  Oaktree  patterns  pattern_recognition  quotes  think_differently  value_investing/investors 
october 2018 by jerryking
Paul Singer, Doomsday Investor
August 27, 2018 | The New Yorker | By Sheelah Kolhatkar.

Paul Singer, ,
The head of hedge fund Elliott Management, has developed a uniquely adversarial, and immensely profitable, way of doing business.

Bush had co-founded Athenahealth, a platform that digitizes patient medical records and billing claims for hospitals and health-care providers, in 1999, and he had built it into an enterprise with more than a billion dollars in revenue. One of the firm’s marketing taglines was that it freed doctors and nurses to spend more time doing what they loved—practicing medicine—and less time on paperwork. Athena served more than a hundred thousand health-care providers...... Paul Singer, the founder of Elliott Management and one of the most powerful, and most unyielding, investors in the world. Singer, who is seventy-three, with a trim white beard and oval spectacles, is deeply involved in everything Elliott does. The firm has many kinds of investments, but Singer is best known as an “activist” investor, using his fund’s resources—about thirty-five billion dollars—to buy stock in companies in which it detects weaknesses. Elliott then pressures the company to make changes to its business, with the goal of improving the stock price.....Hedge funds, especially activist hedge funds, are established users of private-investigation services.....The investor acknowledged that Bush was far from perfect, and said that “there is a role for activists to hold managements accountable.” But the investor worried that the focus on the bottom line would undermine the innovative spirit that had made Athena successful. “.....The idea that companies exist solely to serve the interests of shareholders—rather than also to serve workers, customers, and the larger community—has been dominant in the business world in the past thirty years. As the field of activist investing becomes increasingly crowded, many investors are going beyond their original mission of finding ailing or mismanaged companies and pushing them to improve. Instead, some have been targeting larger, financially prosperous companies, such as Procter & Gamble, Apple, and PepsiCo. ......Often, activists advocate for measures that drive up the stock price but can have negative effects in the future, such as the outsourcing of jobs, the elimination of research and development, and the borrowing of money to buy back a company’s own stock. The wisdom of these tactics has come under increasing scrutiny. Some of the most successful businesses to emerge in recent decades have staved off short-term pressures, forcing their investors to be patient with uncertainty and experimentation. The founder of Amazon, Jeff Bezos, wrote in an early investor letter that building something new “requires you to experiment patiently, accept failures, plant seeds, protect saplings.” ........Over time, this lack of long-term vision alters the economy—with profound political implications. Businesses are the engine of a country’s employment and wealth creation; when they cater only to stockholders, expenditures on employees’ behalf, whether for raises, job training, or new facilities, come to be seen as a poor use of funds. Eventually, this can result in fewer secure jobs, widening inequality, and political polarization. ..........Bush spoke about his last day in the office, when he had sobbed during his final address to Athena’s employees. He had also written a farewell letter. “I believe that working for something larger than yourself is the greatest thing a human can do. A family, a cause, a company, a country—these things give shape and purpose to an otherwise mechanical and brief human existence,” the letter read. “The downside about things that are larger than ourselves, of course, is that we who have the privilege of serving them ourselves are fungible. It is the fundamental definition. You can’t have the grace of the one without the other......Throughout our conversations, Bush returned to a theme that consumed him. He talked about how investors like Singer—financiers who take the assets built by others and manipulate them like puzzle pieces to make money for themselves—are affecting the country on a grand scale. A healthy country, he said, needs economic biodiversity, with companies of different sizes chasing innovation, or embarking on long, hard projects, without being punished. The disproportionate power of the Wall Street investor class, Bush felt, dampened all that, and gradually made the economy, and most of the people in it, more fragile.
distressed_debt  Elliott_Management  financiers  hard_goals  hard_work  hedge_funds  investors  long-term  patience  Paul_Singer  profile  shareholder_activism  Sheelah_Kolhatkar  time_horizons  vulture_investing  Wall_Street 
august 2018 by jerryking
Winton Capital’s David Harding on making millions through maths
NOVEMBER 25, 2016 | Financial Times | by Clive Cookson.

Harding’s career is founded on the relentless pursuit of mathematical and scientific methods to predict movements in markets. This is a never-ending process because predictive tools lose their power as markets change; new ones are always needed. “We have 450 people in the company, of whom 250 are involved in research, data collection or technology,” he says. That is equivalent to a medium-sized university physics department....Harding's approach to making money is to exploit failures in the efficient market theory...the problem with the EMT is that “It treats economics like a physical science when, in fact, it is a human or social science. Humans are prone to unpredictable behaviour, to overreaction or slumbering inaction, to mania and panic.”...The Winton investment system is based instead on “the belief that scientific methods provide a good means of extracting meaning from noisy market data. We don’t make assumptions about how markets should work, rather we use advanced statistical techniques to seek patterns in huge data sets and base all our investment strategies on the analysis of empirical evidence...Harding emphasises the breadth and volume of investments involved, covering bonds, currencies, commodities, market indices and individual equities. The aim is to exploit a large number of weak predictive signals, he says: “We don’t expect to find any strong relationships between data and the price of the market. That may sound counter-intuitive but if there are strong relationships, someone else is going to be exploiting those. Weak relationships are where we have a competitive advantage.” Weather strategies are one feature of Winton research, including analysis of cloud cover and soil moisture levels to predict the prices of agricultural commodities. Other important indicators, for which maths can uncover value not fully reflected in market prices, include seasonal factors and inventory levels across supply chains....When I ask Harding about the use of machine learning and artificial intelligence to guide investment decisions, he bristles slightly. “There is a sudden upsurge of excitement about AI,” he says, “but we have used techniques that would be described as machine learning for at least 30 years.”

Essentially, he says, quantitative investing, self-driving cars and speech recognition are all applications of “information engineering”....he heads off to a lecture by German psychologist Gerd Gigerenzer, who runs the Harding Centre for Risk Literacy in Berlin
communicating_risks  mathematics  hedge_funds  investment_research  financiers  Winton_Capital  physics  Renaissance_Technologies  James_Simons  moguls  quantitative  panics  overreaction  massive_data_sets  philanthropy  machine_learning  signals  human_factor  weak_links  JumpMath 
november 2016 by jerryking
At BlackRock, a Wall Street Rock Star’s $5 Trillion Comeback - The New York Times
SEPT. 15, 2016 | NYT | By LANDON THOMAS Jr.

(1) Laurence Fink: “If you think you know everything about our business, you are kidding yourself,” he said. “The biggest question we have to answer is: ‘Are we developing the right leaders?’” “Are you,” he asked, “prepared to be one of those leaders?”

(2) BlackRock was thriving because of its focus on low-risk, low-cost funds and the all-seeing wonders of Aladdin. BlackRock sees the future of finance as being rules-based, data-driven, systematic investment styles such as exchange-traded funds, which track a variety of stock and bond indexes or adhere to a set of financial rules. Fink believes that his algorithmic driven style will, over time, grow faster than the costlier “active investing” model in which individuals, not algorithms, make stock, bond and asset allocation decisions.

Most money management firms highlight their investment returns first, and risk controls second. BlackRock has taken a reverse approach: It believes that risk analysis, such as gauging how a security will trade if interest rates go up or down, improves investment results.

(3) BlackRock, along with central banks, sovereign wealth funds — have become the new arbiters of "flow.“ It is not about the flow of securities anymore, it is about the flow of information and indications of interest.”

(4) Asset Liability and Debt and Derivatives Investment Network (Aladdin), is BlackRock's big data-mining, risk-mitigation platform/framework. Aladdin is a network of code, trades, chat, algorithms and predictive models that on any given day can highlight vulnerabilities and opportunities connected to the trillions that BlackRock firm tracks — including the portion which belongs to outside firms that pay BlackRock a fee to have access to the platform. Aladdin stress-tests how securities will respond to certain situations (e.g. a sudden rise in interest rates or what happens in the event of a political surprise, like Donald J. Trump being elected president.)

In San Francisco, a team of equity analysts deploys data analysis to study the language that CEOs use during an earnings call. Unusually bearish this quarter, compared with last? If so, maybe the stock is a sell. “We have more information than anyone,” Mr. Fink said.
systematic_approaches  ETFs  Wall_Street  BlackRock  Laurence_Fink  asset_management  traders  complacency  future  finance  Aladdin  risk-management  financiers  financial_services  central_banks  money_management  information_flows  volatility  economic_downturn  liquidity  bonds  platforms  frameworks  stress-tests  monitoring  CEOs  succession  risk-analysis  leadership  order_management_system  sovereign_wealth_funds  market_intelligence  intentionality  data_mining  collective_intelligence  risk-mitigation  rules-based  risks  asset_values  scaling  scenario-planning  databases 
september 2016 by jerryking
From Wall Street Banking, a New Wave of Fintech Investors - The New York Times
By LIZ MOYERAPRIL 6, 2016
Continue reading the main storyShare This Page
Share
Tweet
Email
More
investors  angels  fin-tech  Wall_Street  financiers 
april 2016 by jerryking
Schwarzman Scholars Announces Inaugural Class to Study in China - The New York Times
By ALESSANDRA STANLEY JAN. 10, 2016

On Monday, the program will announce the first 111 scholarship winners. Mr. Schwarzman, chairman and co-founder of the Blackstone Group, the private equity and investment giant, started the program with a goal of identifying, as he put it, “your best guess as future leaders of the world.”

Some of the recipients, selected from a pool of 3,000 applicants, already seem well on their way.

Lt. Daniel Glenn, 28, is a graduate of the United States Naval Academy. He did his scholarship interview via Skype from a secret location in Iraq, where he is the officer in charge of a Navy special operations platoon that defuses bombs and underwater explosives. Lieutenant Glenn has also founded two philanthropic organizations, and he broke a Guinness World Record for running a mile in an 80-pound bomb suit (8 minutes and 30 seconds). He told his interviewers that he intended to eventually run for the Senate.

Other winners include Rugsit Kanan, 22, a Harvard student from Thailand who writes poetry in English, Thai and Mandarin and plays on the Thai national chess team; Wang Zhe, 26, an economics major from Tsinghua University who was secretary of the Communist Youth League at the school of architecture and taught math and science in Kenya; and Jacob Gaba, 22, a computer science major at Dartmouth College who made a video of himself called “Guy Dances Across China in 100 Days” that went viral.

At his Manhattan office on Thursday, Mr. Schwarzman said that he had modeled his fully funded master’s program on the Rhodes scholarship, but that his was “global with a bit of a U.S. twist.”

His goal is to establish a $450 million endowment that would fund up to 200 students every year: 45 percent from the United States, 20 percent from China and 35 percent from other countries.
financiers  moguls  passions  China  Colleges_&_Universities  elitism  Stephen_Schwarzman  scholarships  Rhodes  Tsinghua  philanthropy 
january 2016 by jerryking
ETF pioneer Som Seif isn’t afraid of the competition - The Globe and Mail
CLARE O'HARA
TORONTO The Globe and Mail Last updated: Friday, Jan. 08, 2016

Education: Bachelor of Industrial Engineering from the University of Toronto
Best investment decision: “Investing in myself. I’ve always felt more comfortable investing in my future and career and I tell everyone that investing in their own career will always be their best investment.”
Worst investment decision: “Have several ‘lessons’ I have learned, all leading to avoid letting my emotions make my investment decisions.”

Favourite books: “I have lots but two of them are Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman and The Education of An American Dreamer by Peter G. Peterson.
financial_services  Som_Seif  Bay_Street  books  financiers  entrepreneur  profile  investing  ETFs  Daniel_Kahneman 
january 2016 by jerryking
Meet the Zaouis
23 May 2015 | Financial Times | Jonathan Guthrie.

The business plan for their M&A advisory firm was essentially a Post-it note reading 'Allons-y!" But in the two years since they set it up, broth...
finance  financiers  investment_banking  London  United_Kingdom  start_ups  boutiques  mergers_&_acquisitions 
july 2015 by jerryking
Buying a Better World questions the legacy of financier George Soros, but doesn’t give us a full answer - The Globe and Mail
PAUL WALDIE
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Feb. 27 2015,

Title Buying a Better World: George Soros and Billionaire Philanthropy
Author Anna Porter
Genre business
Publisher TAP Books
Pages 224 pages
Price $19.99
Year 2015
George_Soros  moguls  books  Paul_Waldie  financiers  legacies 
march 2015 by jerryking
Argentina’s banking talent stays away - FT.com
December 30, 2014 2:22 pm
Argentina’s banking talent stays away
By Benedict Mander and John Paul Rathbone
Wall_Street  financiers  Diaspora  émigrés  Argentinians  Argentina  cronyism 
january 2015 by jerryking
CI Financial co-founder G. Raymond Chang was a legend - The Globe and Mail
JACQUELINE NELSON and ANNA NICOLAOU
CI Financial co-founder G. Raymond Chang was a legend Add to ...
SUBSCRIBERS ONLY
The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Jul. 28 2014
obituaries  Bay_Street  financiers  philanthropy  Ryerson  Caribbean 
july 2014 by jerryking
Lunch with the FT: Vikram Pandit - FT.com
July 11, 2014 | FT | By Tom Braithwaite.

“For a large group of people who grew up over the past two, three, four decades, they’ve been in a very different world – it was a world of predictable growth, it was a world of the ability to finance yourself, it was a world where you could really put one foot in front of the other. You find people grappling with what’s the new sustainable model for growth. And that is true of countries, it’s true of businesses.”
At the same time, Pandit proclaims that, largely thanks to technology, “It’s never been easier to start your own business.”
Our starters arrive. Beetroot and ricotta for Pandit while I get a plate decorated with delicious oily slivers of fish and vegetables offset by the occasional crunch from puffed rice and bite of horseradish.
“Bon appétit,” says Pandit, as he slices into a beetroot and continues to extol the virtues of something he calls the “SMAC stack”. I tell him this sounds awful but, he assures me, “it’s the vernacular for the ease for which you can get into business today,” and it stands for “Social media, Mobility, Applications and Cloud.
“Data is like . . . You’re too young, but there was a movie with the [line about] plastics.” When I assure him I’m familiar with The Graduate, he says: “Data is this generation’s plastics. I don’t see business models being truly successful until you get it.”...Pandit has a fondness for big concepts and management-speak and it can be difficult to bring him down to earth. I press him for examples. “You have large auto companies saying, ‘Where is the growth?’ and, on the other hand, you have a SMAC stack that’s created Uber. What’s interesting is that all those intangible abilities are inside the auto companies to make it happen.”
He has been investing in a steady stream of companies that he thinks embody innovative ideas that might make them the next Uber, the suddenly ubiquitous taxi-ordering app. At the same time, he is chairman of TGG Group, a consulting company set up by Steven Levitt, co-author of pop economics book Freakonomics – which aims to help corporations unlock their inner Ubers....Accordingly, while many of Pandit’s new investments are financial companies – Orchard, a platform for users to trade loans; CommonBond, a student lending platform; Fundbox, which lends money to small businesses against their invoices – only one, in India, has any aspirations to be a traditional bank.
With many of his new interests, Pandit says he is looking to remove “frictions”, which happen to be the way Citi and other banks make their money: for example, the middle men that sit between a big bond manager and retail investors and charge a fee. As he points out, the wealthiest individuals are not saddled with these costs to the same extent.
Vikram_Pandit  Citigroup  Wall_Street  career_paths  start_ups  financiers  financial_services  Sheila_Bair  fin-tech  Steven_Levitt  data  behavioural_economics  Second_Acts  reinvention  platforms  layer_mastery  data_driven  jargon  frictions  pain_points  large_companies  growth  Fortune_500  intangibles  SMAC_stack  automotive_industry 
july 2014 by jerryking
Marc Faber's Biggest Mistake - WSJ.com
Sept. 20, 2013 | WSJ |By Jamie Lee.


Faber also lent an old buddy $50,000 and never saw it again. "When you want to collect, people don't return emails, they don't call back," he said. Lesson learned: He now only makes family-friend loans that are backed by assets. He has done a lot better buying and keeping a host of memorabilia. Faber, who lives in Thailand and races around on motorbikes, began building a stash of Chairman Mao posters, badges and other collectibles in the '70s when Mao was close to death.

Once worth just a few cents each, some of the 330,000 badges he bought are now worth at least $150 apiece. But Faber is in no hurry to sell. "I don't need the money," he says. "It's an unusual collection, and I have a very large office."
collectors  collectibles  high_net_worth  money_management  Marc_Faber  personal_finance  Thailand  Swiss  financiers  mistakes  investors 
december 2013 by jerryking
CPPIB’s Mark Wiseman: A creature of habit with a taste for the new - The Globe and Mail
TARA PERKINS

TORONTO — The Globe and Mail

Published Friday, Feb. 01 2013, 7:40 PM EST

Last updated Saturday, Feb. 02 2013
CPPIB  Mark_Wiseman  dealmakers  private_equity  financiers 
february 2013 by jerryking
Quadrangle Capital Acquires GoodTimes Infomercial Firm - WSJ.com
February 10, 2003 | WSJ | By MARTIN PEERS.

Quadrangle Capital Acquires GoodTimes Infomercial Firm
Steven_Rattner  Quadrangle  private_equity  direct-response  financiers 
january 2013 by jerryking
Insider Trading Persists, and Gets Stealthier - NYTimes.com
By JAMES B. STEWART
Published: December 7, 2012

Why has insider trading proved so persistent, even in the face of prosecutions and popular Hollywood films like “Wall Street”?

The risk-versus-reward equation that has always been a factor in financial markets has changed drastically in the last 20 years....many people who work in financial markets “are highly skilled at cost-benefit analysis,” Mr. Bharara told me. “They’re highly intelligent. They’ve been to the best schools. They weigh the risk of getting caught against the potential reward, and they decide it’s worth the risk. We’re trying to tilt that equation.” There’s no doubt that the potential for gain “has soared,” Robert S. Khuzami, head of enforcement at the S.E.C., told me, and not because there are more takeovers and other market-moving events to trade on. “That’s a big change from the 1980s and ’90s. Hedge funds can take massive positions, use short-selling and derivatives, and employ trading techniques that aren’t transparent, and make huge amounts of money on small fluctuations on price. They don’t need to hit a home run on a $20 pop on a takeover announcement. These bets may be bunts and singles, but they get to the same place.”...The pressure to get an “edge,” as hedge fund traders often put it, has never been greater...In the wake of the Milken-Boesky era, the government has become sophisticated at monitoring major market-moving events like takeover announcements, to the point that insider trading on major corporate news has become relatively rare ...Although some critics say the S.E.C.’s expertise has lagged advances in areas like high-frequency trading, the enforcement division has made progress in monitoring suspicious trading. “We’ve created databases to see who is trading in tandem, even if you know nothing about an event,” Mr. Khuzami said. “It’s a trader-based approach, not an issuer-based approach. These trading patterns are the first clue to what might be insider trading rings. You then have to do the real detective work, pulling phone records and e-mails and using other techniques to uncover the links. ”
insider_trading  Wall_Street  financiers  hedge_funds  Preet_Bharara  investigative_workups  deterrence  Bay_Street  SEC  enforcement  patterns  misconduct  cost-benefit_analysis  slight_edge  trading  stealth  prosecutors 
december 2012 by jerryking
What Happens in Vegas: a Buyout Birthday Blowout for Bonderman - NYTimes.com
November 19, 2012, 12:32 pm3 Comments
What Happens in Vegas: A Buyout Birthday Blowout
By PETER LATTMAN
TPG  private_equity  financiers 
november 2012 by jerryking
Michael Lee-Chin plans his comeback
Jun. 13 2012 | The Globe and Mail | SHIRLEY WON - INVESTMENT FUNDS REPORTER
Michael_Lee-Chin  private_equity  comebacks  high_net_worth  financiers 
june 2012 by jerryking
Warren Hellman Dies at Age 77 - WSJ.com
DECEMBER 20, 2011 | WSJ | By DON CLARK And STEPHEN MILLER.
Warren Hellman 1934-2011
An Eye for Investments and an Ear for Bluegrass
obituaries  private_equity  financiers 
december 2011 by jerryking
Theodore Forstmann, Private Equity Pioneer, Is Dead at 71 - NYTimes.com
November 20, 2011, 1:41 pm Private Equity | Obituaries
Theodore Forstmann, Private Equity Pioneer, Is Dead at 71
By ANDREW ROSS SORKIN
moguls  obituaries  private_equity  financiers  Ted_Forstmann 
november 2011 by jerryking
Why Flush Financiers Court Unloved Businesses - WSJ.com
APRIL 9, 2007 | WSJ | By KAREN RICHARDSON and SERENA NG

Relatively Cheap Entries, Potential for Rich Exits Draw Bargain Hunters to the Turnaround Game.

Veteran financiers flush with cash are turning their sights on industries shunned by the stock market, tapping into tax benefits, newfangled loans and an ability to borrow far more money than public shareholders would tolerate.

...These deals offer a chance for successful restructuring of companies and industries struggling to meet the challenges of globalization, modern technology or economic cycles. As private enterprises, they can undertake union talks and financial restructuring outside the glare of public scrutiny and without worrying about the impact on small shareholders.
boring  Sam_Zell  turnarounds  Wilbur_Ross  restructurings  private_equity  privately_held_companies  financiers  vulture_investing  economic_cycles  unglamorous 
october 2011 by jerryking
Panic of the Plutocrats - NYTimes.com
By PAUL KRUGMAN
October 9, 2011

a broader syndrome, in which wealthy Americans who benefit hugely from a system rigged in their favor react with hysteria to anyone who points out just how rigged the system is.

Last year, you may recall, a number of financial-industry barons went wild over very mild criticism from President Obama. They denounced Mr. Obama as being almost a socialist for endorsing the so-called Volcker rule, which would simply prohibit banks backed by federal guarantees from engaging in risky speculation. And as for their reaction to proposals to close a loophole that lets some of them pay remarkably low taxes — well, Stephen Schwarzman, chairman of the Blackstone Group, compared it to Hitler’s invasion of Poland.

And then there’s the campaign of character assassination against Elizabeth Warren, the financial reformer now running for the Senate in Massachusetts. Not long ago a YouTube video of Ms. Warren making an eloquent, down-to-earth case for taxes on the rich went viral. Nothing about what she said was radical — it was no more than a modern riff on Oliver Wendell Holmes’s famous dictum that “Taxes are what we pay for civilized society.”
Godwin's_Law  Nazis  Paul_Krugman  protests  GOP  hypocrisy  Elizabeth_Warren  Occupy_Wall_Street  Wall_Street  financiers  Stephen_Schwarzman  The_One_Percent  plutocracies  plutocrats  character_assassination 
october 2011 by jerryking
How to give it: J Christopher Flowers
13 Aug 2011 | Financial Times pg. 16. | Angus Watson, J
Christopher Flowers, 53, founded and runs the private equity investment
firm JC Flowers & Co. He donates through the JC Flowers Foundation,
is non-executive chairman of the malaria charity Nets for Life
(www.netsforlife africa.org) and a major donor to Christian Aid
(www.christianaid.org.uk).
ProQuest  private_equity  high_net_worth  philanthropy  interviews  charities  malaria  financiers 
august 2011 by jerryking
Brain Cancer Sharpens Ted Forstmann's Focus on Philanthropy - NYTimes.com
May 23, 2011, 8:59 pm Private Equity | DealBook Column
Philanthropy Given Focus by Brain Cancer
By ANDREW ROSS SORKIN
cancers  private_equity  philanthropy  financiers  Ted_Forstmann 
may 2011 by jerryking
Asher Edelman, the Art World's Gordon Gekko - WSJ.com
JANUARY 29, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By KELLY CROW. A
former corporate raider is shaking up the market with brash tactics and
big plans as an art financier. After navigating the art world for
decades as a collector, museum director and gallery owner, Mr. Edelman
recently set up his own firm, Art Assured Ltd., to arrange art
investments.

The field of art backing is a financial Wild West these days. When the
recession upended the art market a year ago, a number of traditional
institutions like banks and auction houses pulled back from loans and
other financing deals based on the expected selling prices of fine art.
An aggressive set of boutique lenders and financiers have stepped in to
fill the gap. The most prominent art lenders operate as blue-chip
pawnshops, doling out quick cash to collectors, dealers and artists in
exchange for the right to sell the borrowers' artworks if their loans
aren't repaid.
art  art_finance  art_galleries  investing  fine_arts  high_net_worth  collectors  financiers  boutiques  auctions  banks  pawnbrokers  blue-chips  art_market 
january 2010 by jerryking
How to Be a Billionaire: Worry!
Monday, Feb. 05, 2001| TIME | By JOSHUA COOPER RAMO. For
George Soros, the problem is not how to make money. That's easy, he
believes. You do that by spotting mistakes. The problem is the mistakes
themselves. Soros thinks that our history, especially economic history,
is sculpted by blunders. It's a radical proposition, as if you suggested
that Botticelli's best art was the result of paint splatters. But Soros
is insistent: mistakes make history. They also make--and
destroy--fortunes. Soros, who made a fortune looking for and finding
mistakes, worries we are making one now. He picks up on these errors by
listening to his money. These days he doesn't like what he
hears..."George is signal," says a Fed adviser, referring to the high
noise-signal ratio among advice givers to Alan Greenspan.

===================================================
From Farhad Manjoo
Step 1: Worry. If you're an investor, employee, founder, tech journalist or in some other way connected to the tech business, worrying about the bubble is your best defense against the bubble. Worrying keeps you sharp. Worrying keeps magical thinking (i.e. happy talk) at bay. As in the 1990s, the tech industry is pushing grand, society-transforming novelties on the rest of the world. If you're not worried that some of these claims are crazy, you're not paying attention.
====================================================
George_Soros  Joshua_Cooper_Ramo  financial_history  wishful_thinking  Kissinger_Associates  pattern_recognition  patterns  moguls  lessons_learned  mistakes  Bank_of_England  financiers  negative_space  investors  signals  worrying  paranoia  human_errors  economic_history  happy_talk  pay_attention 
october 2009 by jerryking
Private-Equity Leader Lionel Pincus Dies - WSJ.com
OCTOBER 13, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | By PETER LATTMAN and
STEPHEN MILLER. Obituary for Lionel Pincus: 1931 -- 2009, who founded
and built Warburg Pincus LLC into one of the largest firms in the
private-equity industry.
private_equity  obituaries  financiers 
october 2009 by jerryking

Copy this bookmark:





to read