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jerryking : food_safety   44

China has taken our citizens and canola producers hostage. Here’s how Ottawa can muscle up - The Globe and Mail
APRIL 22, 2019 | Globe and Mail | by COLIN ROBERTSON, SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL


Problem: For months, both Canadian citizens and a key part of the Canadian economy have been held hostage by China. After Canada’s detention of Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou, Beijing responded; for nearly 150 days, Michael Spavor and Michael Kovrig have been jailed, denied legal representation, forced to endure sleep deprivation and, in the case of the latter, had his diplomatic immunity abused as an on-leave Canadian foreign-service officer. Beijing then claimed that our canola is infected by pests. That canola embargo is a double whammy: It cuts our current market in half, and also sows doubt among Canadians about our health and safety standards.

If the Trudeau government continues to let this pass without response, we can expect the Chinese to ratchet up the pressure. Our beef, pork and seafood could be next.......A resurgent China is using the Meng affair to demonstrate its power and influence, and in doing so, it is redefining the norms of the rules-based order. Other authoritarians, looking to follow China’s lead, are watching closely.

Solution: * To address the canola embargo, we need to implement a food chain and inspection system that is the best in the world. We need to show foreign customers and Canadians alike that our food is of the highest quality and that “Made in Canada” is a signal of a premium brand. * the Canadian ministerial delegation being sent to China (to demonstrate to Chinese authorities that Canadian canola is pest-free) should read Lord Macartney’s account of his 1793 mission to China’s emperor, which was unsuccessful because of the deep divides between the two sides. * redeploy the trade commissioners recently added to China to markets of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations and Comprehensive and Progressive Trans-Pacific Partnership. * take the plight of the hostages to the various international human-rights tribunals and encourage human-rights NGOs to include them in their advocacy. * Press the cause of the million-plus Uyghurs kept in Chinese concentration camps * apply Magnitsky sanctions against those responsible for depriving the two Canadians of their human rights * Carefully inspect, with a “name and shame” approach to counterfeits and tainted goods, Chinese goods entering Canada. * formally declare that Huawei equipment will not be used in our 5G network buildout because we do not trust China. * arrest/expel Chinese agents are engaging in illicit activities or, if they are working under diplomatic cover, sent home.* send the current Chinese ambassador, Lu Shaye, packing. *Our next ambassador needs to be tough-minded and go into the job without illusions. Xi Jinping’s China is authoritarian, and does not care about human rights. It believes that its system is superior and more efficient than liberal democracy. *urge our allies to keep up the pressure.
ASEAN  authoritarianism  bullying  Canada  Canada-China_relations  canola  China  counterfeits  economic_warfare  food_safety  geographic_ingredient_branding  hostages  intimidation  Justin_Trudeau  Huawei  Meng_Wanzhou  norms  redeployments  reprisals  rules-based  TPP  Uyghurs 
april 2019 by jerryking
Six Technologies That Could Shake the Food World - WSJ
JOURNAL REPORTS: TECHNOLOGY
Six Technologies That Could Shake the Food World
Printed meals, edible bar codes and facial-recognition technology for cows are among the innovations transforming the food industry

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3 COMMENTS
By Annie Gasparro And Jesse Newman
Oct. 2, 2018 10:08 p.m. ET
A machine that prints chicken nuggets. Fake shrimp made out of algae. Edible coverings that keep fruit fresh.

These inventions—and many more—are part of a technological revolution that is poised to shake up the way we eat.

The food industry has been taking heat from consumers and critics who are demanding healthier ingredients, transparency about where their meals come from and better treatment of animals. There is also a growing awareness of the harmful effect that food production can have on the environment.

Now big food companies and entrepreneurs are taking advantage of advances in robotics and data science to meet those challenges—and the trend will likely continue as technology improves, and natural ingre
3-D  technology  food  food_safety  Big_Food  entrepreneur  robotics 
october 2018 by jerryking
Impossible Burger’s ‘Secret Sauce’ Highlights Challenges of Food Tech
AUG. 8, 2017 | The New York Times | By STEPHANIE STROM.

food is not an app. It is far more heavily regulated by governments and much more heavily freighted with cultural and emotional baggage.

“This rush to market is the Silicon Valley mind-set,” said Michael Hansen, a food safety expert who is the senior staff scientist at Consumers Union, an advocacy group. “They think because they’re doing something disruptive, the regulations that apply to other companies don’t apply to them.”

For now, few food start-ups are selling products to consumers. Only Beyond Meat, which uses a traditional pea protein to make its Beyond Burger; Hampton Creek, which makes plant-based sandwich spreads and salad dressings; and Impossible Foods have any notable presence in the market.
food_safety  vegetarian  FDA  Beyond_Meat  Impossible_Foods  plant-based  Hampton_Creek  special_sauce 
august 2017 by jerryking
Whole Foods to Close All Three Regional Kitchens - WSJ
By ANNIE GASPARRO and JESSE NEWMAN
Updated Jan. 25, 2017

Whole Foods Market Inc. is closing its three commercial kitchens, where it makes ready-to-eat meals for stores, including one location which received a regulatory warning about food safety violations last year.

The decision to outsource the food preparation, which was announced to employees last week, comes as Whole Foods works to cut costs by centralizing certain functions and reducing its workforce. ...to streamline operations, we have decided to leverage the expertise of our supplier network to create some of the high-quality prepared foods sold in our stores...Supermarkets across the sector are offering more prepared meals, with some even opening sushi restaurants and wine bars inside their stores. Fresh prepared foods generated $15 billion in sales in supermarkets in 2005, a figure that has nearly doubled to about $28 billion last year, according to Technomic, a food industry research firm.

But the explosion of prepared meals has brought new food-safety issues.
Whole_Foods  grocery  commercial_kitchens  supermarkets  food_safety  product_recalls  Outsourcing  prepared_meals  FDA  centralization  high-quality 
january 2017 by jerryking
Does a national food branding strategy make sense for Canada? - The Globe and Mail
DAINA LAWRENCE
Globe and Mail Update (includes correction)
Published Thursday, Jul. 23, 2015

Australia introduced the “True Aussie” brand into its Asian exports of red meat in the spring of 2014 with great success. Earlier this year other agricultural sectors came forward saying they wanted to reap the same marketing benefits by attaching the True Aussie brand to meat and vegetable exports. The strategy is still in the development stages, but is expected to be in full effect within a year to capitalize on the upswing in Chinese demand – China is Australia’s top purchaser of agricultural products.....The challenge of developing a popular national brand strategy lies in the fact that Canada’s food products are diverse – everything from apples, to meat to dairy and grain. On top of that, the country’s growers range in size from small family-run growers to massive agribusinesses.

“What we would have to do is create an umbrella strategy that is flexible enough that it can be used regardless of the organization that is part of it,” says John Miziolek, president and co-founder of Oakville, Ont.-based Reset Branding, “because there’s no way you could create one singular brand and hope that it would fit everybody’s needs.”

The solution could be creating smaller brands for each of those diverse products and then to develop an umbrella strategy to encompass the smaller classes, he explains. But he emphasizes that making it mandatory would be the strategy’s death knell.

“Just from a branding and marketing perspective that’s a horrible way to start a brand,” says Mr. Miziolek, “forcing people to comply with rules that they’re not very excited about.”
branding  howto  food  Canada  Canadian  China  geographic_ingredient_branding  middle_class  food_safety  competitiveness_of_nations  brands 
july 2015 by jerryking
Buyers and Brands Beware in China - WSJ
July 24, 2014 | WSJ | Editorials.

...Husi's behavior is a classic case of "quality fade," a term coined in the mid-2000s by China manufacturing expert Paul Midler. Companies often start out supplying high-quality products, and Husi enjoyed a top hygiene rating. But they start to cut corners in alarming ways, such as the 2007 scandal of cheap lead-based paint in children's toys.

This is especially likely to happen when customers demand lower prices but don't take an interest in how those savings are achieved. ...Lack of trust is the hallmark of life in China today, which is one reason many rich Chinese choose to move abroad....New supreme leader Xi Jinping's anticorruption campaign may bring some temporary improvement. But if he doesn't build government institutions with integrity, the cheating will resume as soon as the campaign is over.....The lesson for managers is that they must always distrust and verify what their suppliers tell them. Regularly scheduled inspections are useless as the factory will be spruced up for their visit. Surprise visits and spot checks are the only defense against fraud and fakery. In the wild west of the China market, caveat emptor is the only reliable law.
brands  caveat_emptor  China  food_safety  KFC  McDonald's  scandals  trustworthiness  lessons_learned  editorials  product_recalls  skepticism  cost-cutting  quality  high-quality 
august 2014 by jerryking
Compliance with the Produce Traceability Initiative
August 13, 2013 | Food Safety Magazine |By David Freed.

The Product Traceability Initiative (PTI) was created by the Produce Marketing Association, Canadian Produce Marketing Association and the United Fresh Produce Association, in conjunction with the produce industry (suppliers, retailers, wholesalers, foodservice). The initiative envisions supply chain-wide adoption of electronic traceability for every case of fresh produce shipped for consumers.

Standard identification allows members of the produce supply chain to easily scan, obtain and register the data encoded in the bar code. In case of a recall, the source and span of affected produce can be quickly identified to reduce human risk. Products unaffected by recalls can be easily separated toreduce business risk.

Barcode print quality is fundamental to accurate identification. If a barcode doesn’t scan, packagers and retail customers must manually type in the human readable numbers. This process is time-consuming and prone to input errors. Retailers may reject cases that do not have clear bar codes and some may reject full pallets, leading to costly rework and possibly lost merchandise.
traceability  fresh_produce  compliance  food_safety  Waudware 
july 2014 by jerryking
An Overview for the Fresh Produce Industry of Recall Insurance for Food Safety Events
Insurers writing this coverage include Chartis, XL Insurance, Starr, Crum and Forster, Zurich, Lloyd’s, and Caitlin
fresh_produce  insurance  product_recalls  food_safety  law_firms 
march 2014 by jerryking
Taylor Farms, Big Food Supplier, Grapples With Frequent Recalls - NYTimes.com
August 29, 2013 | NYT | By STEPHANIE STROM.


Taylor Farms, the large vegetable producer whose salad mix is being investigated in connection with an outbreak of illness involving hundreds of people in 22 states, has had an unusual number of voluntary recalls for potentially tainted products in the last three years.

The recent investigation of greens used at Olive Garden, Red Lobster and possibly other restaurant chains follows three recalls by Taylor Farm this year. The company initiated three others in 2012 and three in 2011, according to the Food and Drug Administration.
product_recalls  salads  fresh_produce  agribusiness  food_safety  FDA  CDC  vegetables  large_companies 
september 2013 by jerryking
Leafy Greens Cause the Most Illnesses—Mushrooms, the Least
January 30, 2013 | Business Week |By Venessa Wong.

The average American eats only 4 pounds of mushrooms each year, compared to 30 lbs. of lettuce.

Also, greens such as lettuce and spinach cause illness more frequently because they are consumed more often, not because they are grown or harvested in a riskier way than other vegetables...In fact, the problem with leafy greens has less to do with farming than with handling. Many were tainted with norovirus, which causes stomach flu, and “were most often contaminated during preparation or service by a sick food handler,” the report found. Infected persons are contagious “from the moment they begin feeling sick until at least three days after they recover” and can spread the virus through vomit and stool, according to the CDC.
illness  fresh_produce  product_recalls  Waudware  salads  CDC  food_safety  mushrooms  traceability  viruses 
april 2013 by jerryking
Vegetables Are the Main Cause of Food-Borne Illness, CDC Study Finds - WSJ.com
January 29, 2013 | WSJ |By BILL TOMSON.
Vegetables Big Culprit in Food Illness.

Lettuce and other leafy vegetables are healthy for you, but they are also the largest source of food-borne contamination in the U.S., according to a new government report.

About 2.2 million people get sick annually from eating contaminated leafy vegetables. That represents about 23% of the 9.6 million cases of food-borne illness each year, a study released Tuesday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows.

Produce foods, a category that includes vegetables, fruits and nuts, sicken 4.4 million people a year, according to the report. Although that is a greater number than the 2.1 million illnesses caused by contaminated beef, pork, poultry and other meat, the pathogens found on meat are generally more deadly than those found on vegetables, according to the report.
CDC  fresh_produce  food_safety  pathogens  vegetables 
january 2013 by jerryking
World Food Safety Products Industry
PR Newswire [New York] 04 Dec 2012

High profile international foodborne illness outbreaks, in addition to large product recalls due to food safety concerns, will continue to fuel demand as the prevention, identification, and traceability of food contaminants will remain key issues for consumers, food industry participants, and legislators.
food_safety  industries  trends  product_recalls 
january 2013 by jerryking
Whether you buy grass-fed or ‘natural,’ meat safety isn't guaranteed - The Globe and Mail
SARAH ELTON

Special to The Globe and Mail

Published Tuesday, Nov. 20 2012,

buying a safer meat is more complicated than simply choosing local, organic, naturally raised or grass-fed. In fact, none of these labels is guaranteed to be safer.

Whether your steak comes from a cow that was raised on a feedlot and slaughtered in a large abattoir, or from an animal that ranged on grass and was given a nice pat by its farmer before meeting its end, some research indicates that the chance of the meat bringing a pathogen into your home is equal.
beef  food_safety  product_recalls  locavore  pathogens  organic  meat  E._coli  grass-fed  faith-based  steaks 
november 2012 by jerryking
Amid Salmonella Case, Food Industry Seems Set to Back Greater Regulation - NYTimes.com
July 31, 2008
Amid Salmonella Case, Food Industry Seems Set to Back Greater Regulation
By BINA VENKATARAMAN
traceability  food  food_crops  food_safety  regulations 
november 2012 by jerryking
How you can guard against food poisoning - The Globe and Mail
LESLIE BECK

Special to The Globe and Mail

Published Tuesday, Jul. 03 2012
summertime  picnics  food_safety 
july 2012 by jerryking
FDA Is Expected to Seek More Food-Safety Powers - WSJ.com
September 26, 2007 | WSJ | By JANE ZHANG.

FDA Is Expected to Seek More Food-Safety Powers
Plan Would Include A Proactive Approach, Faster Response System
FDA  food_safety  product_recalls 
june 2012 by jerryking
Turning traceability into profitability
April-1st 2007 | Good Fruit Grower | Melissa Hansen.

The tracking and documenting of what happens to a food product as it makes its way to the consumer generates mounds of data.
traceability  tracking  food_safety  fruits  farming  agriculture 
june 2012 by jerryking
Can Food Industry Police Itself? - WSJ.com
October 15, 2007 | WSJ | By JANE ZHANG
Can Food Industry Police Itself?
New Safety System Likely to Focus On Prevention, but Trust Is an Issue
food_safety  product_recalls  FDA  Kraft  regulation 
june 2012 by jerryking
Big debate about food safety | Canadian Grocer
Chris Powell, photo by Canadian Press.  |  September 21, 2011

Frank Schreurs, president and chief technical officer for the Guelph Food Technology Centre–which audits more than 1,500 food businesses, agrees. The CMAJ editorial has “taken some information and they’re couching it to make it sound like, ‘Oh we’re in a lot of trouble.’ We’re not,” says Schreurs. “We’ve got one of the soundest food safety systems in the world.”

Charlebois, now associate dean at the University of Guelph’s College of Management and Economics, thinks consumers must also share some of the blame for food safety. He estimates that close to 85% of
the reported 11 million annual cases of food-borne illness are the result of improper
handling at home.
product_recalls  tracking  traceability  audits  Sylvain_Charlebois  food_safety 
december 2011 by jerryking
With a Long List but Short on Money, F.D.A. Tackles Food Safety - NYTimes.com
By WILLIAM NEUMAN
August 22, 2011

A landmark food safety law passed by Congress last December is supposed
to reduce the frequency and severity of food safety problems, but the
roll call of recent cases underlines the magnitude of the task....The
agency is taking on the expanded mission at a time when Washington
budget-slashing means that regulators have little hope of getting
additional money and may instead have their budgets cut by Congress....A
budget freeze or cuts would have the greatest impact on the ambitious
increase in inspections called for under the new law, which ramp up each
year.

“Writing rules is inexpensive (jk: i.e. policymaking is easy); enforcing them is expensive (jk i.e. implementation is hard), said David W. Acheson, a former associate commissioner of the F.D.A. who is now a
food safety consultant. “There will be a public health impact because
enforcement won’t be to the extent they want to do it.”
product_recalls  implementation  food_safety  hard_work  FDA  cost-cutting  policymaking  public_health  enforcement  regulation  pairs  frequency_and_severity  regulators  cutbacks  quotes  rule-writing  budget_cuts 
august 2011 by jerryking
A Food Manifesto for the Future - NYTimes.com
February 1, 2011, 10:28 pm
A Food Manifesto for the Future
By MARK BITTMAN
Mark_Bittman  food_safety  food  sustainability  farming  supply_chains  cri_de_coeur 
february 2011 by jerryking
Food Trucks Face Roadblocks in Chicago - WSJ.com
DECEMBER 13, 2010 | WSJ | By LAUREN ETTER Moving Violations:
In Chicago, Cooking and Driving Don't Mix. City's Restrictions on Food
Trucks Test Chefs' Creativity; Hold the Fried Oysters.
food_trucks  Chicago  restrictions  food_safety 
december 2010 by jerryking
What's on your plate? Canada lags in tracing food for safety and profit
Nov. 22, 2010 | The Globe and Mail | Jessica Leeder — Global
Food Reporter. Savvy food companies, driven by the spate of
high-profile recalls and an increasingly competitive market, have begun
publicly flaunting their farm-to-fork “traceability”. Translated from
industry jargon, that means their ability to trace and to catalogue,
step-by-complicated step, the journey food takes from the moment it
leaves the farm (or sea) until it arrives on a plate.
traceability  product_recalls  food_safety 
november 2010 by jerryking
globeandmail.com - Raw tomatoes cause salmonella outbreak
June 5, 2008 | G&M | by Carly Weeks. Article on tomatoes
and food traceability.



Those weaknesses have been amplified in the past few decades

" Fresh produce has always been vulnerable to bacterial contamination, in part because it's grown outside and may come into contact with animals in the field or contaminated fertilizer, or be tainted by unsanitary handling.

Those weaknesses have been amplified in the past few decades by the explosion of industrial-sized farms and the proliferation of dominant companies who supply a large portion of the product available on store shelves."
food  food_crops  product_recalls  traceability  tomatoes  food_safety  tracking  E._coli 
january 2009 by jerryking

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