recentpopularlog in

jerryking : foodservice   29

The Missing Piece in Big Food’s Innovation Puzzle
April 1, 2019 | WSJ | by By Carol Ryan.

.......In truth, they are becoming reliant on others to do the heavy lifting. Specialist food ingredient companies like Tate & Lyle and Kerry Group work with global brands behind the scenes to come up with new ideas. These businesses can spend two to three times more on innovation as a percentage of turnover than their biggest clients.

One part of their expertise is overhauling recipes. Ingredients companies can do everything from adding trendy probiotics to taking out excess sugar or gluten. Nestlé got a hand from Tate & Lyle to remove more sugar from its Nesquik range of flavored drinks, while Denmark’s Chr. Hansen helped Kraft Heinz switch from artificial to natural colors in the U.S. giant’s Macaroni & Cheese......Another service food suppliers offer is coming up with successful innovations to help revive sales. Nestlé’s ruby chocolate KitKat, which has become very popular in Asia, was actually created by U.S. cocoa producer Barry Callebaut, for example.

=============================================
See also, "For innovation success, do not follow the money"
07-Nov-2005 | Financial Times | By Michael Schrage "There is
no correlation between the percentage of net revenue spent on R&D
and the innovative capabilities of an organisation – none,"...Just ask
General Motors. No company in the world has spent more on R&D over
the past 25 years. Yet, somehow, GM's market share has
declined....R&D productivity – not R&D investment – is the real
challenge for global innovation. Innovation is not what innovators
innovate, it is what customers actually adopt. Productivity here is not
measured in patents granted but in new customers won and existing
customers profitably retained..
customer_profitability  Big_Food  brands  flavours  food  foodservice  health_foods  healthy_lifestyles  ingredients  ingredient_diversity  innovation  investors  Kraft_Heinz  large_companies  Mondelez  Nestlé  new_ideas  R&D  shifting_tastes  start_ups  Unilever 
april 2019 by jerryking
Food Distributors Make Changes as Costs Bite
Nov. 23, 2018 | WSJ | By Heather Haddon.

Food distributors, the intermediaries between packaged-food makers and farmers on one side and restaurants and grocers on the other, are especially sensitive to cost pressures. Their operations are less automated than those of some other businesses, increasing their exposure to the worker shortages and rising wages that come with a tight labor market. Surging demand is also pushing up the cost of for-hire transportation.

To adapt to rising logistics and shipping expenses, distributors say they are shifting some deliveries to smaller trucks that don’t need full rig loads. They are also trying to pack trucks more efficiently and break down delivery routes to make them shorter. Some distributors are also turning to online brokers, like the Freight unit of Uber Technologies Inc., that use technology to match cargo with available trucks, a process some say is faster and more efficient.
foodservice  Sysco  streamlining  intermediaries  cold_storage 
november 2018 by jerryking
How Canada's Serruya Family Made Some $300 Million Off A Bunch Of Faded Food-Service Brands
Jun 19, 2016, 07:15pm
How Canada's Serruya Family Made Some $300 Million Off A Bunch Of Faded Food-Service Brands

Amy Feldman
Forbes Staff
ice_cream  private_equity  Toronto  franchising  cold_storage  brands  foodservice  Serruya 
october 2018 by jerryking
Anh Nguy: Research Is Her Recipe - The New York Times
ocations
As told to PATRICIA R. OLSEN

Q. What do you do as a culinologist for Ingredion?

A. Culinology is a fusion of culinary arts and food science. Culinologists typically create food concepts for food companies and restaurants that end up on store shelves and menus. We are also known as research chefs. People come to Ingredion for the ingredients we manufacture, like starches, texturizers and sweeteners, or to collaborate on a product. I work on both types of projects in our professional test kitchen, and I also give presentations to potential customers. I’ll ask them if they want natural ingredients, a gluten-free product and so forth.
commercial_kitchens  food  career_paths  research  OPMA  foodservice  flavours  food_science  recipes  manufacturers  niches  Toronto  clusters  innovation  chefs 
november 2015 by jerryking
A Seismic Shift in How People Eat - The New York Times
By HANS TAPARIA and PAMELA KOCHNOV. 6, 2015

....Consumers are walking away from America’s most iconic food brands. Big food manufacturers are reacting by cleaning up their ingredient labels, acquiring healthier brands and coming out with a prodigious array of new products. ....Food companies can’t merely tinker. Nor will acquisition-driven strategies prove sufficient, because most acquisitions are too small to shift fortunes quickly. ....For legacy food companies to have any hope of survival, they will have to make bold changes in their core product offerings. Companies will have to drastically cut sugar; process less; go local and organic; use more fruits, vegetables and other whole foods; and develop fresh offerings. General Mills needs to do more than just drop the artificial ingredients from Trix. It needs to drop the sugar substantially, move to 100 percent whole grains, and increase ingredient diversity by expanding to other grains besides corn....a complete overhaul of their supply chains, major organizational restructuring and billions of dollars of investment, but these corporations have the resources.
abandonment  food  foodservice  brands  supply_chains  innovation  shifting_tastes  Nestlé  Perdue  Tyson  antibiotics  trends  Kraft  supermarkets  fresh_produce  OPMA  consumer_behavior  General_Mills  iconic  consumers  McDonald's  ingredient_diversity  seismic_shifts  new_products  Big_Food 
november 2015 by jerryking
Study: Food industry in flux, but still 'powerful'
March 19, 2014 | Western News | By Paul Mayne.

According to a recently released Ivey Business School report, The Changing Face of Food Manufacturing in Canada: An Analysis of Plant Closings, Openings and Investments, the closures are not a sign of an industry in trouble, rather one that is reorganizing production to maintain global competitiveness....While not out of the woods yet, Sparling said plant closures and consolidations will continue, but new openings and investments will balance the scales and grow, albeit slowly, a stronger Canadian food industry.

“It’s a very tough and completive business,” he said. “Input costs have been going up – be it energy or farm products – and you have a retail sector that is amazingly competitive with very low margins, so they are not interested in higher prices. The food industry is caught in the middle.

“That’s why they figured out they had to focus on cost and efficiency. That means they had to be a lot more competitive. That’s why we’re seeing this. The industry, going forward, is going to look different. The Ontario industry is going to keep changing.”
food  agribusiness  Ivey  manufacturers  foodservice 
april 2014 by jerryking
Sysco to Buy US Foods for $3.5 Billion to Create Food-Distribution Giant - WSJ.com
By
Annie Gasparro,
Sarah E. Needleman
and
Ryan Dezember
connect
Updated Dec. 11, 2013
The two biggest U.S. food-distribution companies announced a merger that will create a giant with about $65 billion in annual revenue and enhanced clout over purchasing by institutions ranging from restaurants and hotels to hospitals and schools.

Sysco Corp. SYY 0.00% said it will buy rival US Foods for $3.5 billion, uniting two middlemen that are already central players in the service economy. Sysco alone has about 425,000 customers, and it and US Foods together collected about 27% of the revenue in the U.S. food-distribution market last year, according to research firm Technomic Inc....Founded in 1969, Sysco has grown to 48,100 employees world-wide, thanks in part to acquisitions of smaller regional players. But the US Foods deal is by far its largest to date.

Sysco considered buying US Foods almost seven years ago but didn't. Mr. DeLaney said the change of heart came because US Foods became a more efficient company.

He said US Foods has technology related to customer ordering and a mobile application that Sysco is interested in.
Sysco  food  foodservice  distribution_channels  mergers_&_acquisitions  M&A  Clayton_Dubilier_Rice  KKR  middlemen 
december 2013 by jerryking
Playa Cabana: Mediocre Mexican falls short of promises - The Globe and Mail
CHRIS NUTTALL-SMITH
The Globe and Mail
Published
Friday, May. 31 2013

One evening I watched a man in a Sysco uniform push two hand trucks of boxed oxtail, frozen octopus and other groceries through Playa Cabana’s Junction dining room. Sysco is a Houston-based foodservice distributor, the world’s largest. It is the restaurant-supply equivalent to Walmart, approximately, the last place a principled kitchen goes for local, sustainable, organic, artisanal groceries.
Mexican  restaurant_reviews  restaurants  Chris_Nuttall-Smith  Toronto  foodservice  Junction 
june 2013 by jerryking
Menu Development Stacking up to the Competition
August 4, 2008 | Nation's Restaurant News | Christi Ravneberg
IHOP  menus  innovation  foodservice  restaurants  breakfasts 
april 2013 by jerryking
Research: Menu innovation should be a priority
Dec 17, 2012 | Nation's Restaurant News | Fern Glazer.

Sluggish traffic growth has been a major problem for the restaurant industry in recent years, with many concepts plagued by year-over-year dec...
menus  innovation  restaurants  foodservice  brands  statistics  food  slow_growth 
april 2013 by jerryking
Branding basics: The signature dish
Feb 11, 2013 | Nation's Restaurant News | Laura Ries.

The restaurant industry invented a concept I believe should be copied by every other industry: the signature dish.

A signature dish helps c...
branding  foodservice  fast-food  casual_dining  restaurants  marketing 
april 2013 by jerryking
Changing The Recipe Of A Signature Dish Can Be A Risk
March 2010 | QSR magazine | | By Daniel P. Smith.

remaking a signature dish is risky business. Who can forget the consumer backlash Coca-Cola encountered when it altered its recipe in 1985, reverting to its original formula after less than three months on the market with New Coke?

“Changing a signature recipe is a dangerous proposition because there’s risk involved,” says Mark Smith, a research and equity analyst for investment firm Feltl and Company who focuses specifically on restaurants. “Will franchisees be on board with the change? Will this change alienate heavy users?”
fast-food  innovation  chefs  menus  recipes  Domino's  foodservice  risks  QSR 
april 2013 by jerryking
Trends in the Marketing of Fresh Produce and Fresh-cut Products
September 2008 | | by DR. ROBERTA COOK,Dept. of Ag and Resource Economics, University of California Davis
fresh_produce  trends  private_labels  foodservice  statistics  Roberta_Cook  food  supermarkets  grocery  fruits  vegetables  U.S.  barriers_to_adoption  surveys  slides 
february 2013 by jerryking
Oil-handling firms pursue $10 M
May 18, 2001 | CityBusiness | Andrew Tellijohn
restaurants  fast-food  fats  foodservice 
january 2013 by jerryking
Virtuous soya oil looks for followers
December 14, 2005 | Financial Times pg. 10 | Jeremy Grant
soybeans  fats  Monsanto  innovation  foodservice  agribusiness 
january 2013 by jerryking
Canada's food producers relish taste of success
Sep. 06 2012 | The Globe and Mail | by TAVIA GRANT

Toronto - now the second-largest food producer in North America after Chicago - has developed a comprehensive food plan. In May, Ontario unveiled a food-cluster strategy that aims to attract global investment and promote Canadian products overseas. This fall, the province will open an institute of food-processing technology that will eventually host 500 full-time students. The Conference Board is working on a national framework for the food industry and the Canadian Agri-Food Policy Institute is also working on policy.

It's a promising source of employment. Making a chicken nugget or pre-made Caesar salad, for example, typically needs more people than making a car part. Wages also tend to be higher - jobs in the industry yield wages that are on average 25 per cent higher than the national average, the industry says.

Food-innovation centres are springing up across Canada with government and university backing, from Charlottetown's smart kitchen to Burnaby's agri-food centre. They frequently function as labs that bridge researchers, students and the private sector.

Guelph's food-technology centre is used by companies such as Italpasta Ltd. and McCain Foods to test out new ideas and combine new types of ingredients. One room, a cross between a giant kitchen and mad-science lab, tests new types of cheeses and ice creams.

The centre also helps companies identify new trends. Karen McPhee, manager of product-development services, rattles off several shifts: sodium-reduced food, gluten-free products and simpler, more natural ingredients. Food is being viewed as medicine, she says, with more products that promise Omega 3s, antioxidants or probiotics.

The sector faces its share of headwinds. Like other manufacturers, a strong currency and volatile energy prices are causing headaches, and it has smaller economies of scale than many counterparts.
Tavia_Grant  food  honeybees  manufacturers  food_tech  niches  Toronto  clusters  innovation  agribusiness  foodservice  Guelph  economies_of_scale  probiotics  product_development  Canada  Canadian 
december 2012 by jerryking
TreeHouse dips into soup
March 13, 2006 | Crain's Chicago Business |By: Julie Jargon
private_labels  soups  fast_followers  TreeHouse  foodservice 
july 2012 by jerryking
You Are What You Eat
October 01, 2000 | American Demographics - Advertising Age |By: David J. Lipke
market_segmentation  Colleges_&_Universities  surveys  lifestyles  Sodexho  foodservice 
july 2012 by jerryking
What Greece Makes, the World Might Take - NYTimes.com
By ADAM DAVIDSON
Published: July 3, 2012

In the last decade or so, companies in the United States, France, Denmark and elsewhere flouted the feta ruling and invested in their own food-science research and manufacturing equipment. They subsequently turned the salty, crumbly cheese into spreadable, grillable, fat-free and shelf-stable forms. In Italy and Spain, small olive-oil producers merged into globally competitive conglomerates and replaced presses with more efficient centrifugal technology. The two countries now provide nearly all the world’s supply. And the Greeks, despite their numerous inherent advantages, remain in the least profitable part of the supply chain, exporting raw materials at slim margins.

Tassos Chronopoulos, owner of Tassos, a Greek food importer based outside Chicago, says that the country’s disorganized agricultural business all but disqualified itself from partaking in the fancy-food craze of the past few decades. Greek growers never banded together to establish uniform quality standards and trade rules.
agribusiness  agriculture  cheese  competitiveness_of_nations  conglomerates  dairy  Denmark  disorganization  disunity  economic_development  farming  food  food_science  foodies  foodservice  France  gourmet  Greece  Greek  innovation  olive-oil  quality  quality_control  rules_of_the_game  standardization  technical_standards  supply_chains  value_chains 
july 2012 by jerryking
Indirect Approach Helps A Start-Up Win Business - WSJ.com
November 11, 2003 | WSJ | By PAULETTE THOMAS | Special to THE WALL STREET JOURNAL.

For start-ups attempting to pitch a sale to a big corporation, it may make more sense to penetrate the target through a side door. Piggyback with a current vendor of record already serving that large corporation.
Aramark  enterprise_clients  foodservice  large_companies  partnerships  serial_entrepreneur  small_business  Sodexho  start_ups  subcontracting 
may 2012 by jerryking

Copy this bookmark:





to read