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jerryking : foreign_policy   64

The U.S. is sinking. Maybe it's time for Canada to jump ship.
Oct 30, 2019 | Macleans.ca | by Scott Gilmore.

Things are not going well for American foreign policy. At the geopolitical level, tectonic shifts in world power are leading to a relative decline in American dominance.......Institutionally, the U.S. State Department is in utter disarray......Donald Trump is steering from one collision to another.....we can speculate whether the U.S. decline is an inevitable result of historical political and demographic trends. Or whether it's entirely due to Donald Trump.....whether incompetence or fate, there is no question the American ship of state is leaking badly. The question we should now be asking ourselves, as Canadians, is whether we should help bail or build our own raft.....The instinctive answer is to grab a bucket......In the halls of Global Affairs Canada, the orthodoxy is that we sink or swim with Washington, and therefore, when the Trump circus finally leaves town, we should undoubtedly be there to help rebuild American prestige and influence wherever we can.

But—what if we didn’t? What if we simply boarded our own raft, or paddled over to another ally? What if we decided to “Trump-proof” Canada? What if we consciously and ambitiously began to build a new foreign policy alignment in anticipation of the next American wreck?.....Who else supports human rights, a rules-based international system and strong Western institutions like NATO? The obvious answer is the EU......we are far more likely to achieve our common goals of multilateralism and the rule of law if we join forces more closely. As Canada’s diplomats begin to brief Canada’s next government on the menu of foreign policy options, it would be nice to think that there is a tiny footnote that points out this one small but true idea—when it comes to Washington, there are other options.
America_in_Decline?  Canada  Canadian  crossborder  beyondtheU.S.  Donald_Trump  EU  foreign_policy  generating_strategic_options  geopolitics  Global_Affairs_Canada  imperial_overstretch  international_system  middle-powers  multilateralism  retreats  rules-based  rule_of_law  Scott_Gilmore  seismic_shifts  Trump-proofing  U.S.foreign_policy  U.S._State_Department  Washington_D.C. 
november 2019 by jerryking
Ottawa is on the wrong side of Chinese power
January 15, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | JOHN IBBITSON.

Is there a way Canada could have avoided acting on an extradition request of the United States – employing the “creative incompetence” that former Liberal foreign minister John Manley said might have prevented the detention of Huawei chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou? She is the daughter of Huawei’s founder, and Chinese anger at her detention is fierce and real.

“I’m with John Manley that we could have creatively avoided our responsibilities,” said Lynette Ong, a political scientist at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy at the University of Toronto. Canada could manage American anger at letting Ms. Meng slip away more easily than it is managing China’s anger over her detention, Prof. Ong believes.

Did Canadian officials in Ottawa miss an opportunity to de-escalate the conflict through quiet diplomacy, rather than ratcheting up the rhetoric over what appeared to be the retaliatory detention of Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor? Should they have foreseen that the Chinese might further retaliate by increasing the punishment of convicted drug trafficker Robert Schellenberg from 15 years to a sentence of death? How much of this is Donald Trump’s fault?

Or was none of this preventable?....So, what next?....The government obviously cannot interfere with the judicial process that will determine whether Ms. Meng is extradited to the United States. Nor can Mr. Trudeau attempt to resolve the situation by direct talks with Chinese President Xi Jinping, ....A successful conclusion to Sino-American trade talks might calm things down......Ong urges Mr. Trudeau to put down his public megaphone, and to focus on “quiet diplomacy behind the scenes.”.......There is another, deeper, concern. For at least two decades, Liberal and Conservative governments have concentrated more and more decision-making in foreign affairs in the Office of the Prime Minister. Global Affairs Canada may no longer have the capacity it once had to manage critical files, and political advisers to Ms. Freeland and Mr. Trudeau may be out of their depth, missing subtle signals and opportunities to reduce tensions between Ottawa and Beijing.
5G  Canada  China  China_rising  Canada-China_relations  Chrystia_Freeland  crossborder  foreign_policy  Huawei  John_Ibbitson  John_Manley  Liberals  Meng_Wanzhou  political_staffers  Xi_Jinping  Justin_Trudeau  diplomacy  PMO  reprisals 
january 2019 by jerryking
Globe editorial: Why the Meng case feels like a replay of 2001 - The Globe and Mail
On Sept. 10, 2001, if you’d asked a random collection of international policy experts to name the biggest challenge to the global order, most of them would have given a one-word answer: China.....And then 9/11 happened. Nearly two decades later, it’s as if the world has awakened from that detour to find itself at its original destination, and much sooner than expected.

A China once rising has now risen – by some measures, it’s already the world’s largest economy......It’s why the arrest this month of Meng Wanzhou in Vancouver, and China’s response, feel like a kind of replay of the Hainan incident – but under very different circumstances. Compared with 2001, today’s China is far more powerful. It is also more than ever at the centre of the global economic and political system. Yet, it doesn’t always follow the rules and norms of that system. And that has created a paradox – the paradox expected by pre-9/11 analysts. China is part of the system. It is also an antagonist.

Though it’s put itself and its products at the centre of the international economy, China also operates with one foot outside of the international order. For example, it’s part of the WTO and its free-trade rules, from which it benefits. But it takes advantage of the rules more than it follows them.

It’s part of a global co-operative of organizations such as Interpol....but earlier this year, the man it placed at the head of the organization was effectively disappeared by his own government.....It’s also a government that responded to the arrest of Ms. Meng by kidnapping two Canadians on invented charges...The case is a reminder of the two big China challenges that Ottawa, and its allies, must grapple with.

The fact that China is part of the international economy and the largely open movement of goods and people is a good thing.....However, China has abused the invitation to join the international trading system. The Trump administration is right that China is an unfair trader. The trade relationship has to be realigned. The goal should not be to shut China out. It must be to ensure that China is made fully part of the system and is bound by rules imposed by the rest of the developed world, which together is much wealthier and more powerful than China.
Canada  Canada-China_relations  China  China_rising  developing_countries  editorials  foreign_policy  Huawei  international_system  Meng_Wanzhou  multipolarity  paradoxes  piracy  reprisals  rogue_actors  U.S.-China_relations  WTO 
december 2018 by jerryking
Canada can no longer rely on U.S. for global leadership, Freeland says - The Globe and Mail
ROBERT FIFE AND MICHELLE ZILIO
OTTAWA — The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Jun. 06, 2017

Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland says the Liberal government will make a “substantial investment” in the military because Canada can no longer rely on Washington for global leadership in the face of threats of Russian adventurism and the need to combat the “monstrous extremism” of Islamic State......Ms. Freeland said Canada has been able to count on the powerful U.S. military to provide a protective shield since 1945 as she argued this country needs to significantly build up the Canadian military with “a substantial investment” to help confront strategic threats to liberal democracies.

“To rely solely on the U.S. security umbrella would make us a client state,” she said. “To put it plainly: Canadian diplomacy and development sometimes requires the backing of hard power.”

Ms. Freeland listed North Korea, the civil war in Syria, the Islamic State, Russian aggression in the Ukraine and Baltic states and climate change as major threats to the global order.

“We will make the necessary investments in our military, to not only address years of neglect and underfunding, but also to place the Canadian Armed Forces on a new footing – with new equipment, training, resources and consistent and predictable funding,” she said.....The minister described how and why Canada’s role in the Second World War allowed the country to help shape the post-1945 multilateral order.

Canada has continued to play a large role in promoting multiculturalism and diversity and providing a home to the downtrodden – refugees fleeing persecution, famine or wars – she said. It has taken a strong stand on the world stage, promoting gender equality and a rule-based international order.
capabilities  U.S.foreign_policy  Donald_Trump  Canada  Canadian  foreign_policy  leadership  Chrystia_Freeland  ISIS  hard_power  sovereignty  WWII  post-WWII  world_stage 
june 2017 by jerryking
Review: ‘Winter is Coming’, by Garry Kasparov
NOVEMBER 8, 2015 | FT | Review by John Thornhill

‘Winter is Coming: Why Vladimir Putin and the Enemies of the Free World Must be Stopped’, by Garry Kasparov, Atlantic Books, £16.99; Public Affairs, $26.99

"The price of deterrence always goes up"

the real power of Kasparov’s book lies in his argument that the west must pursue a more assertive and moral foreign policy, something that has faded out of fashion. In his view, the most moral foreign policy is also the most effective. It enhances international security by insisting on observance of law....one of the most important aspects of any moral foreign policy is its consistency. Western leaders should keep talking about human rights issues in good times as well as bad. Otherwise, these issues become just another chip on the “geopolitical gaming table”. Those leaders should also insist on raising these subjects with strong autocracies, such as China, as well as the weak.

in Kasparov’s view, US President Bill Clinton squandered the chance to advance the international human rights agenda in the 1990s, as the west took a holiday from history. And today the west is too “uninformed, callous, or apathetic” to assert its influence and values.

He, rightly, argues that one of the most important aspects of any moral foreign policy is its consistency. Western leaders should keep talking about human rights issues in good times as well as bad. Otherwise, these issues become just another chip on the “geopolitical gaming table”. Those leaders should also insist on raising these subjects with strong autocracies, such as China, as well as the weak.
books  Russia  Vladimir_Putin  book_reviews  authors  writers  dictators  dictatorships  deterrence  dissension  Ukraine  human_rights  strategic_thinking  autocracies  chess  authoritarianism  foreign_policy  geopolitics  liberal_pluralism  rogue_actors  Garry_Kasparov  consistency  exile 
january 2017 by jerryking
China’s foreign minister demanded meeting with Justin Trudeau - The Globe and Mail
NATHAN VANDERKLIPPE AND ROBERT FIFE
BEIJING and OTTAWA — The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Jun. 02, 2016

In Ottawa on Wednesday, Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi lashed out angrily at a reporter’s question that mirrored Canadians’ concerns about human rights and China’s seizing of disputed regions of the South China Sea. His fiery response revealed the difficulty Chinese diplomats have in convincingly representing their government’s position.

The journalist specifically asked about China’s detention of a Canadian missionary on charges of espionage.
Justin_Trudeau  China  China_rising  diplomacy  foreign_policy  human_rights 
june 2016 by jerryking
G-zero: the new world order
October 10-11, 2015| FT | Gillian Tett


A few weeks ago, as grim news tumbled out of Syria, I travelled to a pleasant American holiday resort to participate in a conference of (mostly western) pol...
Gillian_Tett  geopolitics  Ian_Bremmer  G-Zero  foreign_policy  Cold_War 
november 2015 by jerryking
Jeffrey Simpson: Want to be a world player, Canada? Get ready to spend - The Globe and Mail
JEFFREY SIMPSON
Want to be a world player, Canada? Get ready to spend
SUBSCRIBERS ONLY
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Oct. 30, 2015
Jeffrey_Simpson  foreign_policy  Liberals 
october 2015 by jerryking
Britain resigns as a world power
May 21, 2015 |The Washington Post | Fareed Zakaria
"I was struck by just how parochial it has become. After an extraordinary 300-year run, Britain has essentially resigned as a global power.

Over the next few years, Britain’s army will shrink to about 80,000."... Why does this matter? Because on almost all global issues, Britain has a voice that is intelligent, engaged and forward-looking. It wants to strengthen and uphold today’s international system — one based on the free flow of ideas, goods and services around the world, one that promotes individual rights and the rule of law.

This is not an accident. Britain essentially created the world we live in. In his excellent book “God and Gold,” Walter Russell Mead points out that in the 16th century many countries were poised to advance economically and politically — Northern Italy’s city-states, the Hanseatic League, the Low Countries, France, Spain. But Britain managed to edge out the others, becoming the first great industrial economy and the modern world’s first superpower. It colonized and shaped countries and cultures from Australia to India to Africa to the Western Hemisphere, including of course, its settlements in North America. Had Spain or Germany become the world’s leading power, things would look very different today.
BBC  books  cosmopolitan  cost-cutting  cutbacks  David_Cameron  drawdowns  EU  Fareed_Zakaria  foreign_policy  forward_looking  geopolitics  globalization  industrial_economy  international_relations  international_system  internationalism  leadership  London  middle-powers  parochialism  punch-above-its-weight  retreats  rule_of_law  superpowers  United_Kingdom  Walter_Russell_Mead 
may 2015 by jerryking
Ottawa’s diplomatic approach to China naive, says former ambassador - The Globe and Mail
CRAIG OFFMAN
The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Mar. 02 2015

In his coming book, Middle Power, Middle Kingdom, Mr. Mulroney takes issue with the federal government’s cultivation of the ambassador and his close working rapport with political staffers in the foreign affairs department.
diplomacy  China  books  John_Baird  foreign_policy  naivete  middle-powers 
march 2015 by jerryking
The promise and peril of digital diplomacy - The Globe and Mail
TAYLOR OWEN
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jan. 09 2015

the same governments that are seeking to enable free speech in countries like Iran are at the same time rapidly expanding the surveillance state. Thanks to the revelations of Edward Snowden we now know how the state has chosen to respond to this new space of digital empowerment. Like a traditional battlefield, they are seeking to control it. To, as they themselves claim, “know it all.”

And herein lies the central tension in the digital diplomacy initiative. By seeking to control, monitor and undermine the actions of perceived negative actors, the state risks breaking the very system that positively empowers so many. And this will ultimately harm those living under autocratic and democratic regimes alike.

The answer, unfortunately, is not as simple as many critics of digital diplomacy assert. Simply returning to traditional in-person diplomacy ignores the global shift to decentralized digital power. Digital diplomacy is a well-intentioned attempt to participate in this new space. However, it is one that is both ill-suited to the capabilities of the state, and is negated by other digital foreign policy programs.

We are at the start of a reconfiguration of power. Navigating this terrain is one of the principal foreign policy challenges of the 21st century.
diplomacy  risks  Communicating_&_Connecting  social_media  foreign_policy  uToronto  public_diplomacy  Outsourcing  Edward_Snowden  challenges  21st._century  rogue_actors  digital_diplomacy  surveillance_state 
february 2015 by jerryking
No Canadian boots on the ground - The Globe and Mail
J.L. GRANATSTEIN
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Aug. 19 2014
foreign_policy 
august 2014 by jerryking
Joe Clark’s new book: Canada is the country that ‘lectures and leaves’ - The Globe and Mail
Nov. 01 2013 | The Globe and Mail | CAMPBELL CLARK.

Our country, Mr. Clark argues in How We Lead: Canada in a Century of Change, should “lead from beside.”
foreign_policy  foreign_aid  diplomacy  Canada  Canadian  leadership  books  soft_power  Joe_Clark  NGOs  international_relations  Commonwealth 
november 2013 by jerryking
An Economic Statecraft Model - NYTimes.com
By DAVID ROHDE
Published: May 7, 2013

The Obama administration’s efforts in the region should be more economic than military. “The United States government has done a terrible job of focusing on economic issues in the Middle East,” Thomas R. Nides, a former deputy secretary of state, told me recently. “You have huge youth unemployment and no hope.”

This argument is hardly new. “To succeed, the Arab political awakening must also be an economic awakening,” Mrs. Clinton said, more than a year ago. “Economic policy is foreign policy,” her successor, John Kerry, said this week.

Last month he asked Congress to approve the creation of a $580 million “incentive fund” that would reward countries in the Middle East and North Africa for enacting reforms that foster market-based economies, democratic norms, independent courts and civil societies.
Africa  statecraft  foreign_aid  foreign_policy  economic_policy  Arab-Muslim_world  Junior_Achievement  economic_warfare 
may 2013 by jerryking
Toward better, smarter foreign aid - The Globe and Mail
Mar. 29 2013 | The Globe and Mail | Editorial

...the federal government’s decision in the 2013 budget to fold the Canadian International Development Agency into the Foreign Affairs Department has aroused controversy, with claims that the government is trying to diminish Canada’s contribution to the overcoming of international poverty. These objections are misplaced. A more focused version of CIDA will do better work. There is no need to measure success by larger budget allocations or some set percentage of Canada’s GDP....Scott Gilmore, the CEO and founder of Building Partners, has changed the focus of his development organization, toward connecting local entrepreneurs in emerging markets to domestic, regional and global supply chains.

“We have changed our entire model. We now work with mining companies to help them find local supplies. We work with local governments so they can learn how to win contracts and back small businesses so they can afford to bid on larger projects. It is a revolutionary way of thinking for the development industry. ”
capacity-building  Canada  Canadian  CIDA  editorials  foreign_aid  foreign_policy  international_development  rethinking  Scott_Gilmore 
march 2013 by jerryking
Why Canada gets no respect in Washington
Jan. 29 2003 | The Globe and Mail |JEFFREY SIMPSON.

It's not so much that Canada is for or against U.S. policies, although the Americans would obviously prefer that we were with them all the way. It's more that Canada often cannot make up its mind, or delays so long that when a decision is taken it's become irrelevant, or backs the U.S. with what a Canadian diplomat has accurately called "calculating calculation." These habits are layered with that reflexive and, to U.S. ears, intensely irritating and totally groundless blather about Canada's moral superiority.
Jeffrey_Simpson  crossborder  foreign_policy  anti-Americanism  feckless 
march 2013 by jerryking
Cementing our hobbled global status
February 2005 | G&M | John Ibbitson.

The decision to say no to missile defence will not delay opening the U.S. border to beef exports, or lead to new tariffs on Canadian wheat. The damage is subtler than that. It takes the form of a new indifference, bordering on contempt, from within the Pentagon and State Department toward Canada's defence and foreign policy.

It manifests itself in a deeply discounted assessment in the White House of Paul Martin's abilities as a leader and his trustworthiness as an ally -- although, interestingly, there is almost as much frustration with Conservative Leader Stephen Harper.
And it entrenches an international assessment that Canada is so weak and fractured internally that domestic political considerations are the sole determinant of Canadian foreign policy. Domestic politics have, of course, played a dominant role in Canadian military and foreign policy from conscription to the Vietnam War to the invasion of Iraq. But successful states should be able to act in the global arena as independent players.
crossborder  John_Ibbitson  Paul_Martin  leadership  foreign_policy  fractured_internally 
september 2012 by jerryking
The missing link, indeed
September 6, 2006| Globe & Mail | Letter to the editor
If foreign policy drives Islamic terror, could Ms. Khan explain the beheading of Christian schoolgirls in the Philippines, the murder of citizens in Thailand, the bombing of tourists in Egypt, the slaughter of black Africans in Sudan, the killing of more than 100,000 Algerians, the massacre of Indians in Mumbai, the daily slaughter of Shiites by Sunnis in Iraq, and murder and mayhem over cartoons? Is the common denominator a belligerent foreign policy toward the Muslim world?
Islamic  terrorism  foreign_policy  Arab-Muslim_world  appeasement  Canada  letters_to_the_editor 
june 2012 by jerryking
Canada is 'back' on the world stage? Hardly
Jun. 13, 2012 |The Globe and Mail |Jeffrey Simpson.

"It is all so penny-wise and pound foolish, especially for a country that once prided itself on punching above its weight and, more important, understood that this is a relatively small country with huge international interests. Now, Canada has retreated into an anglospheric worldview coupled with a focus on trade deals, but lacking any sense of a wider conception of international affairs.

Hectoring and lecturing undoubtedly appeals to the Conservative Party's core voters. It does not impress other governments, including friendly ones."
Jeffrey_Simpson  Canada  foreign_policy  worldviews  punch-above-its-weight  middle-powers  world_stage 
june 2012 by jerryking
Canada must adjust to the Asian century
June 4, 2012 | G&M | RANA SARKAR, president and chief executive officer of the Canada-India Business Council, and a Senior Fellow at the Munk School of Global Affairs in Toronto.
Countries offering practical help to region will be well-placed to reap economic benefits. "Asian countries are at the forefront of the biggest collective action challenges of our time. These range from critical shortages of water, energy and food, to a need to fill education, health care and infrastructure gaps and to address climate and other environmental concerns. Outsiders who offer practical, targeted assistance to Asian countries to overcome these problems will be well-placed to reap the economic and political benefits."
Canadian  Canada  collective_action  foreign_policy  Asian  Asia_Pacific 
june 2012 by jerryking
Why Nations Fail - NYTimes.com
By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN
Published: March 31, 2012

“Why Nations Fail.” The more you read it, the more you appreciate what a fool’s errand we’re on in Afghanistan and how much we need to totally revamp our whole foreign aid strategy. But most intriguing are the warning flares the authors put up about both America and China.

Co-authored by the M.I.T. economist Daron Acemoglu and the Harvard political scientist James A. Robinson, “Why Nations Fail” argues that the key differentiator between countries is “institutions.” Nations thrive when they develop “inclusive” political and economic institutions, and they fail when those institutions become “extractive” and concentrate power and opportunity in the hands of only a few.
book_reviews  Tom_Friedman  China  U.S.  Afghanistan  Non-Integrating_Gap  Egypt  foreign_policy  institutions  foreign_aid  failed_states  institutional_integrity 
april 2012 by jerryking
The remaking of Harper’s China gambit - The Globe and Mail
mark mackinnon
BEIJING— From Saturday's Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Feb. 03, 2012
Stephen_Harper  China  leadership  princelings  travel  foreign_policy  Canada 
february 2012 by jerryking
Canada needs a foreign affairs culture - The Globe and Mail
IRVIN STUDIN

irvin studin
From Wednesday's Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Jan. 04, 2012

The core of the foreign policy and larger international affairs debate in Canada should not be about the ends we may wish to pursue as a collective, but rather about the means necessary to advance the ends legitimately chosen by any elected government. The desired ends will clearly change according to the times and government, but the means to success for Canada are stable and undifferentiated, and they need to be built up.

Without this reversal of strategic logic (means before ends, rather than ends dictating means), we Canadians are left talking to ourselves about problems in the world we're interested in but typically incapable of solving – for lack of the requisite means to do so.......So what's the nature of the "means" debate that Canada needs to have to be a major (and credible) global player this century? Two interrelated "means" levers need to be addressed: national culture and national capabilities. A country that's serious about advancing ambitious ends in the world – defending minority religions or, say, brokering peace and transforming impoverished countries, or even fighting a just war – requires a public culture that can properly assess happenings beyond North America, and can support sustained engagement by Canada beyond our borders. More concretely, it needs the practical capabilities to advance these ends: talent (in key positions), assets (intelligence, military, diplomatic), money and, to be sure, differentiated relationships with players in the world.

To be a leader not only in the Americas but also in the world, Canada needs more foreign affairs culture, and certainly more capabilities. We might start by creating that army of Spanish and Portuguese speakers that the federal government surely requires to advance its stated ends. Let's add some Mandarin and Arabic speakers for good measure.

None of this is possible without a brave political leadership that applies pressure over time to build the culture and capabilities today that will allow us to score major foreign policy achievements in the long term.
Canada  Canadian  capabilities  capacity-building  diplomacy  foreign_policy  leadership  resources  technology 
january 2012 by jerryking
How China Can Defeat America - NYTimes.com
November 20, 2011 | NYT| By YAN XUETONG, who is the author of “Ancient Chinese Thought, Modern Chinese Power,” is a professor of political science and dean of the Institute of Modern International Relations at Tsinghua University....The pre-Qin period of Chinese history-- before China was unified as an empire more than 2,000 years ago — was a world in which small countries were competing ruthlessly for territorial advantage. It was perhaps the greatest period for Chinese thought, and several schools--ancient Chinese political theorists like Guanzi, Confucius, Xunzi and Mencius--competed for ideological supremacy and political influence. They converged on one crucial insight: The key to international influence was political power, and the central attribute of political power was morally informed leadership. Rulers who acted in accordance with moral norms whenever possible tended to win the race for leadership over the long term.
Confucian  Henry_Kissinger  soft_power  alliances  foreign_policy  moral_authority  values  China  China_rising  philosophy  political_theory  power  political_power  leadership  APNSA  political_influence  U.S.-China_relations 
november 2011 by jerryking
They're Mars, we're Venus
21 Mar 2003| The Globe and Mail pg.21 |Jeffrey Simpson.

if foreign policy were only about interests, Canada would urge even closer economic integration (customs union? continental perimeter? harmonized standards?) and would line up with every U.S. foreign policy objective.

But foreign policy is also about instincts -- and Canada's cannot be squared with those of the Bush administration. Canada sees the world, as modest-sized states do, in terms of influence; the U.S. now sees the world almost exclusively in terms of power. Robert Kagan, a conservative U.S. analyst, observes that the U.S. is now Mars and Europe is Venus -- as is Canada.
ProQuest  Jeffrey_Simpson  crossborder  foreign_policy  Canada  U.S.foreign_policy  values  national_identity  hard_power  soft_power  middle-powers  Robert_Kagan 
october 2011 by jerryking
This is no time to give up on the U.S., Mulroney says - The Globe and Mail
tu thanh ha
From Friday's Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Oct. 13, 2011

Canada has a privileged relationship with the United States that shouldn't be squandered, even at a time when U.S. world leadership is waning and new superpowers are emerging, Brian Mulroney says.

“The resilience of America should never be discounted,” the former prime minister said in a luncheon speech on Thursday.

“The need for Canada to safeguard and nurture our interests vis-à-vis America will always – certainly in my lifetime and the lifetime of my children – be the top foreign policy priority of the prime minister of Canada.”
Brian_Mulroney  crossborder  superpowers  leadership  America_in_Decline?  Canada  foreign_policy 
october 2011 by jerryking
We must restore our diplomatic core - The Globe and Mail
Aug. 08, 2011 |G&M |ALLAN GOTLIEB & COLIN ROBERTSON.
Mr. Harper seems to foresee a highly active foreign policy, & a very
independent one. “We also have a purpose,” he said.“And that purpose is
no longer just to go along and get along with everyone else’s
agenda.”..Negotiating a new accord with the US to reverse the hardening
of our border, protecting the access of energy exports to US mkts,
creating new mkts for our oil sands, negotiating a free-trade deal with
the EU & India, strengthening relations with China, protecting Cdn.
interests in the Arctic ...In this age of the Internet & WikiLeaks,
the role of diplomacy needs to be assessed & understood. The PM
should commission a task force on the foreign service, as he did for
Afghan. It’s been > 30 yrs. since the McDougall Commission looked at
our diplomats. There will be no new golden age of Canadian foreign
policy w/o investing in the HR that, in the PM’s words, are necessary
“to making Canada a meaningful contributor in the world.”
capacity-building  Stephen_Harper  Canada  Canadian  foreign_policy  globalization  diplomacy  rebuilding  WikiLeaks  golden_age 
august 2011 by jerryking
From Disraeli to 'the Bang-Bang' - WSJ.com
APRIL 1, 2011

From Disraeli to 'the Bang-Bang'
TV needs action and drama. Foreign policy needs less of both.

By PEGGY NOONAN
Peggy_Noonan  Benjamin_Disraeli  foreign_policy  United_Kingdom  leadership  reflections 
april 2011 by jerryking
For U.S. foreign policy, it should be all about the economy - The Globe and Mail
Dec. 03, 2010 |G&M| CHRYSTIA FREELAND. The most
significant revelation from WikiLeaks isn’t what is in the documents –
it`s what is missing from them. The financial crisis of 2008, and its
agonizing aftermath, changed the world profoundly. It didn’t change the
State Dept. The most important take-away from the Wikileaks is that the
U.S. needs a new foreign policy paradigm to deal with the post-crisis
world. The starting pt. for that paradigm must be to put the economy at
the heart of foreign policy. Some of the savviest wise men in the U.S.
are making that pt., in the latest issue of Foreign Affairs, with two
essays on the importance of the economy for statecraft.....The country
needs a new paradigm because: (1) it has run out of $ to be the world’s
police officer; (2) the recession requires everyone – including
diplomats – to pitch in to put the country back to work; and (3)
national security & int. relations – the classic concerns of
diplomacy – are now driven by economic concerns.
foreign_policy  Chrystia_Freeland  U.S.foreign_policy  economy  economic_policy  WikiLeaks  diplomacy  statecraft 
december 2010 by jerryking
Foreign Policy's Second Annual List of the 100 Top Global Thinkers | Foreign Policy
DECEMBER 2010 | The FP Top 100 Global Thinkers. Foreign Policy
presents a unique portrait of 2010's global marketplace of ideas and
the thinkers who make them.
thought_leadership  best_of  lists  globalization  foreign_policy  booklists  policymakers  policymaking 
december 2010 by jerryking
the arctic: A View From Moscow
2010 | Carnegie Endowment for International Peace | Dmitri Trenin and Pavel K. B
Arctic  Russia  foreign_policy  filetype:pdf  media:document 
december 2010 by jerryking
Voice of Influence
Oct. 07, 2010| TIME| By Richard Stengel. Fareed's worldview
comes in part from being a naturalized American citizen who was born in
Bombay and grew up outside the U.S. in what was then decidedly the
developing world. His academic background — a B.A. from Yale and a Ph.D.
in political science from Harvard — also gives him a set of analytical
tools that few have. "Most journalists ask the 'what' question very
well," he says. "My training is to ask the 'why.' "s. "I'm not in
journalism to play parlor games with elites. I want to help people
become more thoughtful and engaged about the world." ...Fareed is one of
the foremost public intellectuals of our time. He connects the dots on
foreign policy, politics, the economy and the larger culture to make
sense of the world's most important ideas and trends. And he does it
with a subtlety that is nevertheless clear and accessible. For him,
politics and international affairs are complex and gray, not black and
white.
Fareed_Zakaria  profile  sense-making  foreign_policy  politics  economics  trends  popular_culture  public_discourse  journalism  public_intellectuals  connecting_the_dots  engaged_citizenry  worldviews  5_W’s 
october 2010 by jerryking
Canadians should dare to be networked
Jun. 12, 2010 | The Globe and Mail | Editorial.

Canada needs to decide how it wants to act on the world stage. It could aspire to be "the most global and the networked country in the world." This idea is attractive, but foreign policy begins at home - not all Canadians are ready to be global, and they may well bristle at some of the policies such a course suggests.

The advice comes from a new report, "Open Canada", by the Canadian International Council's GPS Project. It advocates "prosperity, peace and cohesion" as the three overarching Canadian national interests, and laments that Canadians too often "prefer the gauzy candescence of 'values discussions' to the hard reality of producing a more prosperous and secure future."
networks  Canada  Canadian  values  geopolitics  globalization  foreign_policy  Asian  China  think_threes  national_identity  world_stage 
june 2010 by jerryking
Open Canada to the world’s new ways
June 9, 2010 | The Globe and Mail | by Edward Greenspon. "As
Canada moves down the ranks, from the world’s seventh-largest economy to
10th and lower, it must navigate the rise of Asia, the relative decline
of the U.S. and the sudden creation of a new multilateralism, among
other game-changers. How do we play this once-in-a-century period of
global disruption?
The Canadian International Council asked a panel of Canadians, a
post-Cold War digital generation largely in its 30s and 40s, to come up
with a new blueprint. Our report, Open Canada: A Global Positioning
Strategy for a Networked Age, offers bold and original policies and
strategies within the realm of the possible. " We call our report Open
Canada because we think we can prosper by being the most open country in
the world: open to ideas and investment; open to newcomers and new
ways; open to partnerships and networks at home and abroad; open to
competition and the uncompromising pursuit of excellence.
borderless  policy  Canada  Canadian  foreign_policy  Edward_Greenspon  openness  decline  America_in_Decline?  one-time_events  blueprints  game_changers  multilateralism 
june 2010 by jerryking
Over A Barrel: Energy-starved China is doing what you would expect
May 16, 2005| Fortune Magazine | by Daniel Yergin.
Energy-starved China is doing what you would expect: becoming a global
oil power. For the most part China is behaving the way any country
starved for oil would, especially one with a well-established domestic
oil industry. China is participating in partnerships, acquiring
reserves, contracting for future supplies of liquefied natural gas,
selling oilfield services, developing projects around the world, and
buying lots of oil. It's a good bet that when a Chinese oil company
enters Iraq, it will be in partnership with one or more Western
companies.
China  oil_industry  foreign_policy  geopolitics  LNG 
march 2010 by jerryking
China Flexes Its Muscles - WSJ.com
JANUARY 2, 2008 |Wall Street Journal | by GORDON G. CHANG.
Deng Xiaoping believed that the country should "bide time" and keep a
low profile in international affairs. Deng's successor, Jiang Zemin,
followed this general approach. Current President Hu Jintao has shifted
China in a new direction, restructuring the international system to be
more to Beijing's liking. The belief is that Beijing has embarked on a
path of high-profile force projection, possibly in areas "way beyond the
Taiwan Strait."
China  China_rising  U.S._Navy  Beijing  PLA  foreign_policy  international_system 
march 2010 by jerryking
Banned aid - The Globe and Mail
Saturday, May 30, 2009 | Globe and Mail | Geoffrey York. The
real reason for the shift, of course, is a new calculation of Canada's
business and geopolitical interests. Instead of Malawi and the seven
other African countries, where most people are so desperately poor that
they earn less than $2 a day, a bigger share of Canada's foreign-aid
money will flow to middle-income places such as Peru, Colombia, Ukraine
and the Caribbean, where Canada's commercial interests are more
attractive. Canada's foreign aid seems to have become an instrument of
its trade policy.
foreign_aid  Africa  canada  canadian  foreign_policy  Geoffrey_York 
june 2009 by jerryking
Obama Faces Tests From Abroad - WSJ.com
Feb. 10, 2009 GERALD F. SEIB lays out a series of challenges
(i.e. :* Iran launching its first satellite into orbit, # Pakistan
freeing A.Q. Khan, # The government of Kyrgyzstan, ordering the closure
of a crucial American air base in its country), that Obama needs to
address.
Obama  foreign_policy  Iran  Pakistan  Kyrgyzstan  challenges  U.S.  Gerald_Seib 
february 2009 by jerryking

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