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jerryking : forensics   5

How Canadian companies can tap into Asia’s consumer boom
Jun. 03 2013 | G&M | by DOMINIC BARTON.

Possible send to Earl Davis of Teachers.

To capture this opportunity, Canadian companies need an intimate understanding of the new Asian consumers. First, on the consumption and services front, they need to locate these consumers, with forensic precision....Second, Canadian companies need to understand the diverse and evolving tastes of Asian consumers. Across the region, the number of higher income households is rapidly expanding. These consumers are often young, are more international in their outlook, and are more willing to pay a premium for quality products. They consume more services, from education and health care to foreign travel....Third, Another significant opportunity for Canada is the provision and delivery of food, energy, and natural resources. By 2030, global demand for food is expected to rise by more than 25 per cent, mostly in Asia, and fertilizer demand will grow by 50 per cent.
Dominic_Barton  McKinsey  China  Canadian  target_marketing  consumer_behavior  shifting_tastes  China_rising  booming  Asia  Asian  Asia_Pacific  BRIC  middle_class  inland  affluence  infrastructure  forensics 
june 2013 by jerryking
Uniting for Cyberdefense - NYTimes.com
By RENÉ OBERMANN
Published: February 19, 2013

A set of basic and accepted rules-of-the-road protects our physical highways and traffic, and we have to have similar, internationally recognized rules for the information highway. We must define standards and functionalities in order to ensure a safe and coherent digital architecture. A good example is the German security standard for “smart meters” that monitor and bill power consumption.

This will not be easy for the I.T. industry. In Europe, the sheer number of Internet providers makes it difficult to find a common position. Again, transparency and information sharing is essential: Every sound effort to implement such rules and standards relies on feedback about vulnerabilities, as well as data on the quantity, quality and origin of attacks. One cannot manage a problem until one can measure it.
collaboration  cyber_security  defensive_tactics  Deutsche_Telekom  frequency_and_severity  forensics  information_sharing  metrics  network_risk  smart_meters  technical_standards  transparency  vulnerabilities 
february 2013 by jerryking
How Wal-Mart Used Payoffs to Get Its Way in Mexico - NYTimes.com
December 17, 2012 | NYT |By DAVID BARSTOW and ALEJANDRA XANIC von BERTRAB.

The NYT’s examination reveals that Wal-Mart de Mexico was not the reluctant victim of a corrupt culture that insisted on bribes as the cost of doing business. Nor did it pay bribes merely to speed up routine approvals. Rather, Wal-Mart de Mexico was an aggressive and creative corrupter, offering large payoffs to get what the law otherwise prohibited. It used bribes to subvert democratic governance — public votes, open debates, transparent procedures. It used bribes to circumvent regulatory safeguards that protect Mexican citizens from unsafe construction. It used bribes to outflank rivals.

Through confidential Wal-Mart documents, The Times identified 19 store sites across Mexico that were the target of Wal-Mart de Mexico’s bribes. The Times then matched information about specific bribes against permit records for each site. Clear patterns emerged. Over and over, for example, the dates of bribe payments coincided with dates when critical permits were issued. Again and again, the strictly forbidden became miraculously attainable.... Wal-Mart declined to discuss its conduct in Teotihuacán while it is continuing its own investigation. The company has hired hundreds of lawyers, investigators and forensic accountants who are examining all 27 of its foreign markets. It has already found potentially serious wrongdoing, including indications of bribery in China, Brazil and India. Several top executives in Mexico and India have been suspended or forced to resign in recent months.

Wal-Mart has also tightened oversight of its internal investigations. It has created high-level positions to help root out corruption. It is spending millions on anticorruption training and background checks of the lawyers and lobbyists who represent Wal-Mart before foreign governments. The company has spent more than $100 million on investigative costs this year.
Wal-Mart  Mexico  corruption  forensics  bribery 
december 2012 by jerryking
Making Sense of Ambiguous Evidence
September 2008 | HBR | A Conversation with Documentary Filmmaker Errol Morris.

The information that top managers receive is rarely unfiltered. Unpopular opinions are censored. Partisan views are veiled as objective arguments. Honest mistakes are made. The manager is then left to sort it all out and come to a wise conclusion.

Few people know how to get an accurate read on a situation like documentarian Errol Morris. He is the award-winning director of such films as The Thin Blue Line and this year’s Standard Operating Procedure, an exploration of the elusive truth behind the infamous photographs taken at Abu Ghraib prison. The Guardian has ranked him among the world’s top 10 directors, crediting him with “a forensic mind” and “a painter’s eye.”

In this article, Morris talks with HBR’s Lisa Burrell about how he sorts through ambiguous evidence and contradictory views to arrive at the real story. “I don’t believe in the postmodern notion that there are different kinds of truth,” he says. “There is one objective reality, period.” Getting to it requires keeping your mind open to all kinds of evidence—not just the parts that fit with your first impressions or developing opinions—and, often, far more investigation than one would think.

If finding the truth is a matter of perseverance, convincing people of it is something of an art, one with which Morris has had much experience not only as a documentarian but also as a highly sought-after director of TV ads for companies like Apple, Citibank, Adidas, and Toyota. He holds up John Kerry’s 2004 bid for the U.S. presidency as a cautionary tale: Kerry struck voters as inauthentic when he emphasized only his military service and failed to account for his subsequent war protest. Morris would have liked to interview him speaking in his own words—natural, unscripted material—so that his humanity, which seemed to get lost in the campaign, could emerge.
anecdotal  HBR  executive_management  CEOs  contradictions  information  information_flows  evidence_based  objective_reality  information_gaps  authenticity  sense-making  ambiguities  uncertainty  persuasion  forensics  postmodern  filmmakers  documentaries  judgment  cautionary_tales 
august 2012 by jerryking
Wolf Hall
21 May 2009 | New Statesman | Review by Rachel Aspden of Hilary
Mantel's Wolf Hall. In the hands of Hilary Mantel, Tudor kitsch
becomes something darker and less digestible. Wolf Hall takes a forensic
slice through a nation caught between feudalism and capitalism, the
Middle Ages and modernity, Catholicism and the revolutionary doctrines
emerging from the Continent. Memories of the disastrous dynastic wars of
the previous century are still fresh, and fears of another are growing.
As there is little national, so there is no personal, security: noble
and commoner alike are only ever a step away from their legal
transformation into a mangled corpse or a smouldering residue of “mud,
grease, charred bone”.

Mantel’s hero for this age of uncertainty is Thomas Cromwell....he is a
champion of reason and – unlike other, less scrupulous members of the
nobility – of the rule of law.
book_reviews  novels  england  royal_courts  fiction  the_English_Reformation  forensics  éminence_grise  Hilary_Mantel  Tudors  feudalism  Protestant_Reformation  protagonists  Middle_Ages  Thomas_Cromwell  historical_fiction 
july 2010 by jerryking

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