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jerryking : forestry   7

Tories pledge to create national park in Rouge Valley
Apr. 08, 2011 | Globe and Mail | TAMARA BALUJA. The
Conservatives have pledged to create a national park right in the
backyard of the country’s largest metropolis. The promise unveiled on
Friday in the party’s election platform would protect the Rouge Valley,
11,500 acres of Canada’s unique Carolinian forestland teeming with
vulnerable wildlife on the eastern edge of Toronto....A relatively
unknown park, the Rouge does not command the same popularity as the
Toronto Islands or High Park. But Scarborough councillor Glenn De
Baeremaeker called Rouge Valley a “hidden treasure” famous for bald
eagles, bluebirds, salamander, river otters and even an occasional black
bear...Stretching from Lake Ontario to the Oak Ridges Moraine and
Pickering, the area is currently overseen by several municipalities,
including Markham, Toronto, Whitchurch-Stouffville and Richmond Hill.
That creates some logistical difficulties.
Conservative_Party  elections  forestry  hidden  Lake_Ontario  parks  ravines  Rouge_Park  Scarborough  Southern_Ontario  Toronto  waterfronts  wildlife 
april 2011 by jerryking
globeadvisor.com: PRINTING MONEY (literally)
March 25, 2011
Forestry is a writeoff, right? Don't try telling that to Chad
Wasilenkoff, whose eye for pulp's value - whether in currency, wallpaper
or rayon - has made Fortress Paper a TSX star

DAVE EBNER
forestry  value_investing/investors 
april 2011 by jerryking
Next Life: Scouring the Forest for the Trees
July 15, 2010 | BusinessWeek | By Alexandra Wolfe. Private
equity player Harald Orneberg sold his fund, then headed for Brazil to
form The Forest Co. and grow (money on) trees.
Brazil  private_equity  Aviva  forestry  timber 
september 2010 by jerryking
Fortress Paper: Outside the box, crazy like a fox -
Aug. 26, 2010 | The Globe and Mail | Dave Ebner

North Vancouver, B.C. — From Thursday's Globe and Mail Published on
Wednesday, Aug. 25, 2010 7:15PM EDT Last updated on Thursday,
investing  value_investing/investors  forestry  deal-making  out-of-the-box 
august 2010 by jerryking
Cities are Buying Local Forests to Rein In Development - WSJ.com
JUNE 15, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | By JIM CARLTON.
Community forests are spreading across the U.S., as more cities and
counties seek to rein in development and excessive logging by taking
control of the woods themselves. In many cases, the communities allow
limited logging to continue to help raise money to offset the costs of
managing the forest as well as beef up municipal coffers.
lumber  forestry 
august 2010 by jerryking
Wealthy Investors Discover Timberland - WSJ.com
MAY 1, 2010 |WSJ| By JEFF OPDYKE.

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https://www.landthink.com/timberland-is-for-small-investors-as-well-as-large/
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The timber business as an asset class makes sense only for ultrawealthy, ultralong-term
investors.Timber isn't lumber, the commodity that trades as relatively
short-term futures contracts. Timberland is the farm from which lumber
ultimately comes, and is a long-term holding.Think decades.Timberland
investing works best at scale = a difficult investment for people of
lesser means.Small plots lack the muscle to generate meaningful income,
since only a fraction of the trees are culled at any one time.The avg.
timber tract is = 400 acres in the Southeast, the US 's wood basket.At
roughly $2k/acre, that's an $800k ante just to play.

Wealthy individual investors typically put their money in timber
investment-management organizations, or TIMOs, which cater largely to
institutions, but which often accept individuals investing a minimum of
between $1 million to $5 million. Some TIMOs do allow individuals to
pool money into a single account to meet the minimum.
assets  asset_classes  economies_of_scale  farming  forestry  high_net_worth  illiquidity  investors  long-term  lumber  timber 
may 2010 by jerryking
Why is McGuinty allowing NW Ontario to be powered down?
February 21, 2009 G&M column by MURRAY CAMPBELL The focus
now is on the cost of electricity, which the industry says is too high
to allow it to be profitable.

Ontario's "all-in" price (which includes various fees) of about $72 per
megawatt-hour is the second-highest in Canada (after Alberta) and is
higher than most U.S. regions.
Ontario  northwestern  forestry  Murray_Campbell  recessions  costs  electric_power 
february 2009 by jerryking

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