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jerryking : forward_looking   24

Rich People
“Rich People plan for three generations
Poor people plan for Saturday night”

― Gloria Steinem
tags: class-distinction, inspirational
quotes  generational_wealth  Gloria_Steinem  personal_finance  social_classes  beforemath  forward_looking  foresight  preparation  time_horizons 
october 2017 by jerryking
Rules for Modern Living From the Ancient Stoics -
May 25, 2017 | WSJ | By Massimo Pigliucci.

Stoicism is practical and humane, and it has plenty to teach us. The philosophy may have been developed around 300 B.C. by Zeno of Cyprus, but it is increasingly relevant today, as evidenced by the popularity of events such as Stoicon, an international conference set to hold its fourth annual gathering in Toronto this October.

The Stoics had centuries to think deeply about how to live, and they developed a potent set of exercises to help us navigate our existence, appreciating the good while handling the bad. These techniques have stood the test of time over two millennia. Here are five of my favorites.

(1) Learn to separate what is and isn’t in your power. This lets you approach everything with equanimity and tranquility of mind. ...Understand and internalize the difference, and you will be happier with your efforts, regardless of the outcome.

(2) Contemplate the broader picture. Looking from time to time at what the Stoics called “the view from above” will help you to put things in perspective and sometimes even let you laugh away troubles that are not worth worrying about. The Roman Emperor Marcus Aurelius made a note of this in his famous personal diary, “The Meditations”: “Altogether the interval is small between birth and death; and consider with how much trouble, and in company with what sort of people and in what a feeble body, this interval is laboriously passed.”

(3) Think in advance about challenges you may face during the day. A prepared mind may make all the difference between success and disaster.

(4) Be mindful of the here and now (i.e. living in the moment). The past is no longer under your control: Let it go. The future will come eventually, but the best way to prepare for it is to act where and when you are most effective—right here, right now.

(5) Before going to bed, write in a personal philosophical diary. This exercise will help you to learn from your experiences—and forgive yourself for your mistakes.

Stoicism was meant to be a practical philosophy. It isn’t about suppressing emotions or stalking through life with a stiff upper lip. It is about adjusting your responses to what happens, enduring what must be endured and enjoying what can be enjoyed.
Stoics  philosophy  Romans  journaling  self-discipline  mindfulness  span_of_control  mybestlife  preparation  beforemath  sense_of_proportion  the_big_picture  anticipating  contextual  forward_looking  foresight  GTD  perspectives  affirmations  beyond_one's_control  chance  living_in_the_moment  Greek  personal_control 
june 2017 by jerryking
What Does It Take to Climb Up the Ladder? - The New York Times
Thomas B. Edsall MARCH 23, 2017

What drives success? Cognitive skills are important, but so are harder-to-measure strengths that fall under the heading of what is sometimes called character......In a 2014 paper, “The Character Factor: Measures and Impact of Drive and Prudence,” Richard Reeves of the Brookings Institution, and two co-authors, Kimberly Howard and Joanna Venator, focus on what they call “performance character strengths” and the crucial role played by noncognitive skills in educational attainment, employment and earned income. These character strengths — “perseverance, industriousness, grit, resilience, curiosity, application” and “self-control, future orientation, self-discipline, impulse control, delay of gratification” — make significant contributions to success in adulthood and upward mobility.

As the accompanying chart demonstrates, upper-income kids perform well on tests of noncognitive skills, but there are substantial numbers of low-income children who do well also.
movingonup  social_mobility  perseverance  industriousness  grit  resilience  curiosity  hard_work  self-control  forward_looking  self-discipline  impulse_control  delayed_gratification  character_traits  up-and-comers 
march 2017 by jerryking
Goldman breaks tradition with unconventional choice
December 17/ December 18, 2016 | Financial Times | Ben McLannahan.

His promotion to chief information officer in 2013 ― after a stint at Credit Suisse and Kiodex, an energy trading software company ― meant that he sat atop Goldman’s biggest division, accounting for about one-third of global headcount.

A big part of that job has been bringing down the amount the bank spends on maintaining old systems, which consume about one-third of Goldman’s annual $3bn tech budgets, according to estimates by Credit Suisse analysts.

He has also taken a page out of Google and Facebook’s playbook and started giving away some of the bank’s trading technology to clients via open-source software, inviting them to use it and improve it.

What sets Mr Chavez apart is “his ability to take decisive action based on what the world will look like in five to 10 years”, says Tom Farley, president of the New York Stock Exchange, who worked with him at Kiodex. “Other people may have a view of the future but they’re afraid to act on it.”

In an address to Goldman interns this summer, Mr Chavez told them that as a new graduate, he wanted to “get busy and do a bunch of things”. When he landed on Wall Street, he learnt that people called that attitude “optionality”.

“You don’t know that these options are going to be worth something, but if you do the work, pay the premium, own a whole bunch of these options on a lot of different outcomes and you’re diversified enough, probably something will work out,” he said.
Goldman_Sachs  Martin_Chavez  CFOs  appointments  Wall_Street  unconventional  SecDB  databases  generating_strategic_options  forward_looking  CIOs  Hispanics  optionality  new_graduates  legacy_tech  playbooks 
december 2016 by jerryking
Sam Altman’s Manifest Destiny - The New Yorker
OCTOBER 10, 2016 |New Yorker | Tad Friend.

Quotation from Admiral Hyman Rickover. “The great end of life is not knowledge, but action,” ...“I believe it is the duty of each of us to act as if the fate of the world depended on him. . . . We must live for the future, not for our own comfort or success.”
Sam_Altman  doers  Y_Combinator  Silicon_Valley  start_ups  investors  entrepreneur  quotes  Paul_Graham  Peter_Thiel  action-oriented  forward_looking  future 
october 2016 by jerryking
Daniel S. Glaser: The Challenge of Keeping It Simple
JULY 15, 2016 | The New York Times | By ADAM BRYANT.

When I joined Marsh more than 30 years ago, he said to me, “Danny, all I can tell you is that there’s going to be a lot of people who don’t think like an owner, and you should always be thinking like you are the owner of the business, and make your decisions like that.”..Empathy is more important as he matured: "Now I have a basic belief that almost everyone wants to contribute and do well. Some people, for a whole variety of reasons, have difficulty doing that, and at least an attempt or two should be made to try to help them."...I’ve always felt that the world is filled with smart people who love complicating stuff. Working to simplify, to try to get down to that first principle, is really important.....My feeling is that companies that do well for long stretches of time have a tendency to become either complacent or arrogant, and both of those are bad paths. So how do you prevent that? To me, you do that by trying to create this striving, challenging, questioning culture, where there’s always a smarter way of doing something, and you feel a permanent dissatisfaction with obtained results.
bonuses  empathy  CEOs  leadership  leaders  complacency  arrogance  hubris  hiring  organizational_culture  forward_looking  simplicity  Marsh_&_McLennan  owners  dissatisfaction  first_principle  restlessness 
july 2016 by jerryking
As Germany Welcomes Migrants, Sexual Attacks in Cologne Point to a New Reality - The New York Times
By ALISON SMALE JAN. 14, 2016

In early December, the Cologne police made their New Year’s Eve preparations. Drawing on the previous year’s experience, they identified their biggest worry as pickpocketing and fireworks among the crowds. So they increased their holiday deployment, to 142 from 88, ...As 2016 neared on Dec. 31, however, some 1,500 men, including some newly arrived asylum seekers and many other immigrants, had instead assembled around Cologne’s train station. Drunk and dismissive of the police, they took advantage of an overwhelmed force to sexually assault and rob hundreds of people, according to police reports, shocking Germany and stoking anxieties over absorbing refugees across Europe....police reports and the testimony of officials and victims suggest that the officers failed to anticipate the new realities of a Germany that is now host to up to a million asylum seekers, most from war-torn Muslim countries unfamiliar with its culture. Working from outdated expectations, the police made a series of miscalculations that, officials acknowledge, allowed the situation to deteriorate. At the same time, both the police and victims say, it was not a situation any of them had encountered before. This was new terrain for all....But the commanding officer at the scene declined an offer of more than 80 reinforcements, who could have been in Cologne in an hour, according to Bernd Heinen, a senior police official, who criticized the commander for failing throughout the night to look ahead and anticipate a worsening situation....
sexual_assault  Germany  migrants  refugees  outdated  assumptions  forward_looking  preparation  miscalculations  anticipating  policing  asylum 
january 2016 by jerryking
Britain resigns as a world power
May 21, 2015 |The Washington Post | Fareed Zakaria
"I was struck by just how parochial it has become. After an extraordinary 300-year run, Britain has essentially resigned as a global power.

Over the next few years, Britain’s army will shrink to about 80,000."... Why does this matter? Because on almost all global issues, Britain has a voice that is intelligent, engaged and forward-looking. It wants to strengthen and uphold today’s international system — one based on the free flow of ideas, goods and services around the world, one that promotes individual rights and the rule of law.

This is not an accident. Britain essentially created the world we live in. In his excellent book “God and Gold,” Walter Russell Mead points out that in the 16th century many countries were poised to advance economically and politically — Northern Italy’s city-states, the Hanseatic League, the Low Countries, France, Spain. But Britain managed to edge out the others, becoming the first great industrial economy and the modern world’s first superpower. It colonized and shaped countries and cultures from Australia to India to Africa to the Western Hemisphere, including of course, its settlements in North America. Had Spain or Germany become the world’s leading power, things would look very different today.
BBC  books  cosmopolitan  cost-cutting  cutbacks  David_Cameron  drawdowns  EU  Fareed_Zakaria  foreign_policy  forward_looking  geopolitics  globalization  industrial_economy  international_relations  international_system  internationalism  leadership  London  middle-powers  parochialism  punch-above-its-weight  retreats  rule_of_law  superpowers  United_Kingdom  Walter_Russell_Mead 
may 2015 by jerryking
Five things the TD Centre can teach us about how to build Toronto - The Globe and Mail
MARCUS GEE
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, May. 01 2015,

The TD towers were a radical departure both in scale and in style. The tallest of the original two soared to 56 floors, dominating the skyline like nothing before or since. Rising from its six-acre site at King and Bay, it was everything the old buildings around it were not. While they featured arched windows and gargoyles, Greek columns and bronze roofs, the design of the TD Centre was all austerity and simplicity.

It is just this sort of future that the creators of the TD Centre had in mind when they hired one of the era’s most renowned architects to build them something outstanding. The architect was Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (1886-1969), the Chicago-based German émigré who liked to say that “less is more.” He referred to his works as “skin-and-bones” architecture, and his unadorned steel-and-glass boxes were meant to reflect the spirit of a modern technological era.

It took ambition and foresight to pull off something as bold as the TD Centre. It meant thinking about what the city would become instead of just coping with what it was. Those qualities sometimes seem lacking in today’s Toronto. There are still things we can learn from those dark towers.

First, don’t be afraid of tall buildings.
Second, investing in quality pays.
Third, maintain what you have.
Fourth, pay attention to details.
Finally, always think about the future. Toronto, and Canada, were in a risk-taking frame of mind when the first tower took shape. Expo 67, the wildly successful world’s fair, was under way in Montreal. The striking new Toronto City Hall by Finnish architect Viljo Revell had opened two years earlier.
'60s  ambitions  architecture  boldness  foresight  history  lessons_learned  Marcus_Gee  skyscrapers  Bay_Street  TD_Bank  Toronto  design  forward_looking  PATH  detail_oriented  minimalism  quality  Expo_67  risk-taking  mindsets  pay_attention 
may 2015 by jerryking
Lou Eccleston: The data-driven emergence of TMX’s new CEO - The Globe and Mail
BOYD ERMAN
The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Oct. 01 2014

And while he has not been CEO of a large public company, he has run big operations. At McGraw Hill, his business unit generated $1.7-billion (U.S.) in revenue, close to three times that of TMX.

McGraw Hill’s executive vice president of corporate affairs, Ted Smyth, worked with Mr. Eccleston on the company’s executive committee. He said Mr. Eccleston is “high energy, global, forward-looking, eloquent and a strong advocate for the power of technology and big data.”
Boyd_Erman  Bay_Street  CEOs  data_driven  forward-thinking  forward_looking  high-energy  Lou_Eccleston  massive_data_sets  TMX 
october 2014 by jerryking
Manage from a Single Piece of Paper
January/February 2007 | Business Owner | Anonymous.

Great managers know exactly where their company based on four or five key indicators. Gary Sutton, legendary turnaround expert and author of The Six Month Fix, urges all business owners to manage from a single piece of paper. Sutton suggests they monitor information that looks ahead, such as: inbound calls/responses by source, orders received by product or product line, returns or warranty claims, total gross profits, payroll expense and accounts receivable. In addition, include a breakdown of costs by expense category. Next add liquidity data, inventory data, and data more upstream in the sales cycle, such as cash on hand and credit available. Have this information delivered to your desk once a week, and you will be empowered with the information needed to do your job. Here as some data sheet items: breakeven point, and performance of each profit engine.
metrics  small_business  running_a_business  KPIs  dashboards  start_ups  data  books  data_driven  indicators  forward_looking  owners  simplicity 
september 2013 by jerryking
What fatal flaw led us so deeply into debt?
October 18, 1997 | Globe & Mail | William Thorsell.

The Unheavenly City by Edward Banfield.

Wisdom has three practical dimensions (with intuition providing a fourth for the truly sage person). The first part of wisdom is knowledge, the second is context based on experience, the third is a long perspective on time......the more forward-looking you are, the higher your social class is. People who live a great deal of their intellectual life in the future derive two great advantages over those who do not: They avoid predictable damage to their interests, and they exploit opportunities that might otherwise be lost to others.

This requires a high tolerance for delayed gratification.

In his engaging book, Future Perfect, Stanley Davis argues that most people are stuck managing the results of things that have already happened....the aftermath. Great leaders manage what has not yet happened....the beforemath. "People who take out life insurance and have home mortgages are managing the beforemath...they are managing the consequences of events that have not yet taken place."
William_Thorsell  books  instant_gratification  delayed_gratification  sophisticated  social_classes  debt  debt_crisis  wisdom  long-term  intuition  far-sightedness  beforemath  anticipating  contextual  forward_looking  foresight  aftermath 
july 2013 by jerryking
Carpe Diem Nation - NYTimes.com
February 11, 2013 | NYT | By DAVID BROOKS.

Europeans who settled America gave their lives a slingshot shape. They pulled back so they could shoot forward. They volunteered to live in harsh conditions today so their descendants could live well for centuries. The pioneers who traveled West did the same thing. So has each generation of immigrants — sacrificing the present for the sake of the future.

This slingshot manner of life led to one of those true national clichés:..This future-oriented mentality had practical effects. For decades, government invested heavily in long-range projects like railroads and canals...Today, Americans have inverted this way of thinking. Instead of sacrificing the present for the sake of the future, Americans now sacrifice the future for the sake of the present...Why have Americans lost their devotion to the future? Part of the answer must be cultural. The Great Depression and World War II forced Americans to live with 16 straight years of scarcity. In the years after the war, people decided they’d had enough. There was what one historian called a “renunciation of renunciation.” We’ve now had a few generations raised with this consumption mind-set. There’s less of a sense that life is a partnership among the dead, the living and the unborn, with obligations to those to come....If the president were to propose an agenda for the future, he’d double spending on the National Institutes of Health. He’d approve the Keystone XL pipeline. He’d cut corporate tax rates while adding a progressive consumption tax. He’d take money from Social Security and build Harlem Children’s Zone-type projects across the nation. He’d means test Medicare and use the money to revive state universities and pay down debt.
David_Brooks  future  Obama  Great_Depression  WWII  instant_gratification  intergenerational_rivalry  delayed_gratification  foresight  far-sightedness  forward_looking  sacrifice  Keystone_XL  long-term  social_trust  consumption  the_Greatest_Generation  Carpe_diem  long-range  railroads  canals 
february 2013 by jerryking
Tips from the pros on how to advance your career
Dec. 28 2012 | The Globe and Mail | HARVEY SCHACHTER.

To advance your career, here are some other pointers:

(1) Surround yourself with smart people

As you move up in an organization, your responsibility increases, and it becomes tougher to do everything on your own.

“Many people feel defeated when they can no longer succeed through their own efforts. Rather than seeing it as a sign of personal weakness, surround yourself with smart people who have different perspectives and different skills,” she says. “Listen to them respectfully and attentively, draw out their ideas, and work to integrate their perspectives into your plans and solutions to problems.”

(2) Be your own CEO.

“Leadership isn’t about a title. Real leadership is about getting big things done in the face of challenges, being part of the solution versus the problem, and inspiring everyone around you – even if you’re the janitor,” he says.

(3) Know yourself

The foundation of success is self-awareness – of your strengths, interests, personality factors and the desires that form the basis of good career choices throughout life...spend time reflecting on one's internal processes.” Routinely ask yourself: Does what I am doing really play into what I’m best at or really want to do – or am I being sidetracked by the appeal of the money or the status of the promotion?

(4) Develop – and use – your contact list

If handed a business card, make sure you put it in your e-mail contacts and send a ‘glad to meet you’ note.” Then keep in touch, perhaps quarterly or twice a year for the “hot contacts” who might help you down the road to advance your career.

(5) Write an anti-résumé

Your résumé probably looks backward at your career. Instead write a forward-looking statement of your strengths, desires and influences, and what possibilities intrigue you for the future. It should be about a half-page, perhaps in bullet-point format. “update it regularly. It helps you to catch clues about the future rather than look through the rear-view mirror as a résumé does,”.

(6) Embrace the digital you (one-page branding site or an authentically powerful LinkedIn profile).
(7) Focus on the fix. (present solutions, not problems. See what might be accomplished, or suggest a solution to a problem or a means of overcoming a barrier.
(8) Rise above being average. Strive to be at the "Picasso-level".
(9) Get involved in volunteering.
(10) Polish your credentials.
LinkedIn  Managing_Your_Career  Roger_Martin  Rotman  Harvey_Schachter  tips  movingonup  self-awareness  networking  problem_solving  leadership  overachievers  personal_branding  CEOs  strengths  forward_looking  résumés  Pablo_Picasso  anti-résumé  volunteering  smart_people  backward_looking  one-page  high-achieving 
december 2012 by jerryking
It's good to be smart
Nov 30, 2010 |The Globe and Mail. pg. A.24 | editorial.

It may be 20 years, or 50, before there is a direct payoff from the BMO Sir Isaac Newton Chair in Theoretical Physics at the Perimeter Institute in Waterloo, Ont. Or from similar chairs to be named after Albert Einstein, Niels Bohr, Paul Dirac and James Clerk Maxwell. But the chairs are a wise investment that deserve emulating in other institutions in Canada.

It is not easy to be forward-looking in difficult times, but now is actually an excellent time to be investing in long-range projects that expand our intellectual capital. Why now? Because while other countries are hamstrung by economic problems, Canada is in decent enough shape to get a jump on attracting talent and stimulating innovation. In a borderless world economy, the value in becoming a magnet for scientists, engineers and entrepreneurs is immeasurable.

Abstract (Summary) Theoretical physics (the description of natural
phenomena in mathematical form) may seem like knowledge for knowledge's
sake. It is anything but, as Mike Lazaridis, the founder and co-chief
executive officer of the BlackBerry-maker Research in Motion Ltd., tells
it. The "next generation of value" will be intellectual capital, rather
than natural resources, he says.
Blackberry  BMO  borderless  broad-based_scientific_enquiry  editorials  endowments  forward_looking  hard_times  intellectual_capital  knowledge  Mike_Lazaridis  natural_resources  Perimeter_Institute  physicists  RIM 
april 2011 by jerryking
Business diary: Claudi Santiago
May 11, 2010 | Financial Times. pg. 10 | Emma Jacobs.

GE's best oil and gas engineering brains lead these sessions; their
technical expertise is incredibly deep and they are constantly pushing
the boundaries, thinking of solutions three, five and even 20 years out.
ProQuest  GE  executive_management  CEOs  profile  oil_industry  anticipating  forward_looking 
may 2010 by jerryking
Technology Is Central To CIA's Strategic Plan - WSJ.com
APRIL 26, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By SIOBHAN GORMAN.
The CIA announced a five-year strategic plan that would invest heavily
in new technologies to combat non-traditional threats like cyber attacks
from overseas and gain better intelligence on rogue states like Iran.
... Mr. Panetta released his five-year plan in remarks to agency
employees. "We govern either by leadership or by crisis," he said.
"That's why we're taking a hard look at future challenges, and what we
want our agency to look like five years from now."
threats  adaptability  instability  unpredictability  rogue_actors  security_&_intelligence  CIA  strategic_planning  cyber_warfare  asymmetrical  Iran  Africa  Pakistan  innovation  Pentagon  forward_looking  leadership  strategic_thinking  decentralization  non-traditional  technology  Leon_Panetta 
may 2010 by jerryking
Goldman Slapped
April 22, 2010 | BusinessWeek | By Jonathan Weil. A civil
suit and a Senate scolding won't be enough to make Wall Street's
wealthiest firm fly right. Article provides excellent analysis of the
role of each of the players in the upcoming SEC-GS civil suit.
Lloyd_Blankfein  Goldman_Sachs  forward_looking  analysis  due  SEC 
april 2010 by jerryking
Chicago Reader Blogs: The Sports Page
"The Wall Street Journal doesn't just follow sports. We lead
the way. Sure you might call our sports coverage analytical, insightful
or even forward thinking, but one thing you can't call it is
conventional. When we report on sports, we focus less on what you've
already seen happen and more on what will happen next. We look behind
the scenes. At the big picture. We tell stories you don't expect from a
perspective as unusual as it is engaging. And we show you the shape of
things to come. It's a whole new take on sports. It's sports in the Wall
Street Journal. And it's 5 days a week. Sports coverage has gone pro."
next_play  WSJ  sports  unconventional_thinking  sportscasting  forward_looking  storytelling  interpretative  aftermath  the_big_picture 
june 2009 by jerryking
Resilience vs. Anticipation: The West is resilient and can roll with the shocks. The East copes through anticipation, the static planning that assumes perfect foresight. - Reason Magazine
August 25, 1997 | Reason | by Virginia Postrel. Great article
outlining the different approaches to living life, business, etc.
There's an East coast "anticipation" or planning approach vs. a West
coast "resilience" approach.
resilience  strategy  anticipating  business_planning  forward_looking  foresight 
may 2009 by jerryking
Anticipating Corporate Crises - WSJ.com
SEPTEMBER 22, 2008 | Wall Street Journal | by JOANN S. LUBLIN
and CARI TUNA

Many U.S. boards don't cope well with a crisis. But some directors are
now ratcheting up efforts to anticipate, and avert, trouble. Too many
boards are stocked with poorly prepared directors, who fail to ask
enough tough questions or adequately scrutinize management, governance
specialists say.
Joann_S._Lublin  anticipating  boards_&_directors_&_governance  preparation  risk-management  risk-assessment  scenario-planning  contingency_planning  forward_looking  crisis  hard_questions 
april 2009 by jerryking
Robert Gates - Defense Secretary - International Relations - Politics - Iraq - Iran - New York Times
February 10, 2008 | New York Times | By FRED KAPLAN

* Importance of forward thinking/planning: “I learned to ask the
question, What’s Chapter 2?” he said. “If we do this, what will they do?
Then what? Then what? Try to think two, three, four moves out.”
* Making the boss successful.
* Meetings imply an action--a policy decision.
security_&_intelligence  profile  meetings  action-oriented  Robert_Gates  anticipating  Fred_Kaplan  forward_looking  managing_up  APNSA  SecDef 
april 2009 by jerryking

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