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jerryking : foxes   5

13D / Our Approach
We are "Foxhogs".
The story of the fox and the hedgehog has been told in many forms through the ages, but the essence of it is always the same. The fox evades his attackers in a variety of inventive but exhausting ways, while the hedgehog adopts one tried and trusted strategy—hunkering down and letting its spikes do the work.

In the words of Greek poet Archilochus: “The fox knows many things, but the hedgehog knows one big thing.” Discussions of the hedgehog and the fox often come down to whether it’s better to be one or the other. But in a world that rewards expertise and the groundbreaking insights that come from the clash of domains, we need to be both. 13D is both.
foxes  hedgehogs  investment_research  investors 
august 2019 by jerryking
Biographer Walter Isaacson explains what made Leonardo da Vinci a genius - The Globe and Mail
RUSSELL SMITH
SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL
PUBLISHED DECEMBER 4, 2017

What we can learn from Leonardo constitutes the peculiar last chapter of this otherwise sober and cautious biography. At its end Isaacson moves from his role as historian into something closer to self-help guru. He lists a set of Leonardish attributes for us to emulate that sound a lot like advice to tech startups: "Retain a childlike sense of wonder… Think visually… Avoid silos… Collaborate…" Add this to repeated comparisons to Steve Jobs, a previous biographee of Isaacson's, and one is reminded that this is a very American biography (Isaacson was managing editor of Time magazine for years), one that sees "creativity" as primarily a corporate asset.
Russell_Smith  books  biographies  genius  Leonardo_da_Vinci  Walter_Isaacson  Steve_Jobs  polymaths  foxes  hedgehogs  renaissance  cross-disciplinary  cross-pollination  generalists  curiosity  creativity  collaboration  silo_mentality 
december 2017 by jerryking
Hillary Clinton’s Diplomatic Legacy
February 11, 2013 | The New Yorker | by George Packer.

The criticism that there is no encompassing “Obama doctrine” misses the point. Geopolitics today is too complex, messy, and various to be bent to America’s will by an overarching doctrine like containment, or a massive initiative like the Marshall Plan, or a single breakthrough like Nixon’s trip to China. A doctrine was what put the country in a deep hole; climbing out required restraint, flexibility, and opportunism. A first-term Secretary of State with one grand strategic vision wouldn’t have matched the demands of the moment, which called for a fox, not a hedgehog....The standard debates in American foreign policy—realism vs. idealism, heavy footprint vs. light footprint—don’t get to the heart of the problem with Obama’s foreign policy. It’s not that diplomatic engagement is the wrong approach; it’s just that the President’s first four years have given us the idea of diplomacy more than the thing itself. In a forthcoming book, “The Dispensable Nation: American Foreign Policy in Retreat,” Vali Nasr, a former adviser under Hillary Clinton and the late Richard Holbrooke, argues that, from North Africa to Afghanistan and Pakistan, the White House has relied too much on the military and the C.I.A. (mainly in the form of drones) to guide policy: “These agencies’ solutions were not, and could never be, a substitute for the type of patient, long-range, credible diplomacy that garners the respect of our allies and their support when we need it.” In Nasr’s view, a White House that feared being called soft and wanted to keep intractable foreign entanglements out of the news turned to Clinton only after things had fallen apart, as in Pakistan at the end of 2011, when she moved to repair a relationship that had degenerated into outright antagonism.

Obama and Clinton wanted to “pivot” away from the Middle East, toward the Pacific, but a bloody hand keeps reaching out to pull America back.
George_Packer  George_Marshall  U.S.foreign_policy  legacies  diplomacy  Middle_East  Mideast_Peace  Obama  Hillary_Clinton  geopolitics  Pakistan  complexity  messiness  restraint  flexibility  opportunism  U.S._State_Department  grand_strategy  Vali_Nasr  CIA  drones  Marshall_Plan  foxes  hedgehogs  long-range  books 
february 2013 by jerryking
Where Obama Shines - NYTimes.com
By DAVID BROOKS
Published: July 19, 2012

it should be noted that Barack Obama has been a good foreign policy president. He, Vice President Joseph Biden, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and the rest of his team have created a style of policy making that is flexible, incremental and well adapted to the specific circumstances of this moment. Following a foreign policy hedgehog, Obama’s been a pretty effective fox. ...Obama has shown a good ability to combine a realist, power-politics mind-set with a warm appreciation of democracy and human rights....Obama has also shown an impressive ability to learn along the way....Obama has managed ambiguity well. ...Obama has also dealt with uncertainty pretty well....Obama has also managed the tension between multilateral and unilateral action...And, partly as a result of his efforts, the world of foreign affairs is relatively uncontentious right now. Foreign policy is not a hot campaign issue.
U.S.foreign_policy  Obama  David_Brooks  unilateralism  multilateralism  foxes  hedgehogs 
july 2012 by jerryking
Technology Review: Whither the Renaissance Man?
May 2005 | Technology Review | By Michael Hawley

We need to save the diversity of the individual. The irony is that
renaissance men and women are in short supply. Such an intense global
mix of cultures, ideas, and innovations, all apparently a mouse click
away, would seem to demand broad educational perspectives. Yet most
schools persist in turning out laser-focused young professionals. To
make a dent in a particular field, a person has to devote a good chunk
of his or her lifetime just to getting to the starting line. This
doesn't favor the jack-of-all-trades.
Benjamin_Franklin  cross-disciplinary  cross-pollination  curriculum  education  foxes  generalists  hedgehogs  life_long_learning  polymaths  renaissance  Renaissance_Man 
may 2009 by jerryking

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