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jerryking : fragmentation   9

Why the electoral surprises keep on rolling in
June 16, 2017 | Financial Times | Gillian Tett.

...."I offer up the acronym “FUCU” — not simply because this summarises what many voters think about their leaders (with apologies to anyone who is offended), but because the letters F, U, C and U point to four important trends."

The first letter, “F”, stands for “Fragmentation”. Modern voters are deeply fragmented and polarised in a social, economic and political sense....But what is fascinating about the 21st century is that while our digital technologies create the illusion that humans are hyper-connected, in fact they divide us in subtle ways....Twitter, Facebook and other social platforms enable us to connect — but only with people we actively select.... Furthermore, since these cyber platforms supply news and information, they tend to fuel tunnel vision and polarisation, as extensive research from data scientists shows.

“U”, the acronym’s second letter, stands for “Untrusting”. ...popular trust in mainstream western institutions has crumbled. But what is more interesting is to look at who people do still actively trust.

‘While our digital platforms create the illusion that humans are hyper-connected, in fact they divide us in subtle ways’....A survey conducted by the public relations firm Edelman, for example, shows that public trust in tech companies has stayed sky-high in recent years. And while trust in leaders and “experts” has fallen, it remains high for our peer groups, suggesting that trust is moving from a vertical axis to a horizontal one. So while only 37 per cent of people trust chief executive officers, 53 per cent trust employees; and while only 29 per cent trust government officials, 60 per cent trust “a person like me”.....The third letter in the acronym stands for “Customisation”. This trend is not widely discussed, but it is crucial. As digital technologies have taken hold in recent years, consumers have started to see it as a God-given right that they should be able to organise the world around their personal needs and views, instead of quietly accepting pre-packaged offerings..... these three trends produce an environment that creates an environment that is the last part of the acronym: “Unstable”. A world with a FUCU culture is a place of political cyber flash mobs, in which passion suddenly explodes around a single issue or person, then dies away. It is a place where it is hard to have a sustained conversation about political trade-offs, and where voters and politicians jump across traditional boundaries with dizzying speed, defying labels as they go.
Gillian_Tett  elections  surprises  fragmentation  customization  instability  unpredictability  trustworthiness 
august 2017 by jerryking
How to battle a dominant brand
Nov. 29 2012| The Globe and Mail | SUSAN KRASHINSKY - MARKETING REPORTER.

This emphasis on customer service, insinuating that dominance has made the competitor lazy because they can afford not to try as hard, is one way to challenge a highly dominant competitor.

Another way is to chip away at a niche segment the competitor may not be looking at. The sweetener product Stevia is currently attempting this. It is facing a very crowded market for sugar alternatives: Globally, roughly 50,000 tonnes of high-intensity sweeteners will have been consumed by the end of 2012. Aspartame accounts for about half of the market in terms of volume, according to Euromonitor International. Saccharine and sucralose, the ingredient in Splenda, also each have a healthy share.

The marketing for Stevia, like other sweeteners, revolves around a reduced calorie option for consumers attempting to keep a healthy lifestyle; with one difference. While other sweeteners are associated with being highly processed, chemical products, Stevia markets itself as natural.

“There’s such a demand for reduced calorie products, and because Stevia has that added natural benefit, it’s doing fairly well and competing for space,” said Lauren Bandy, an ingredients analyst with Euromonitor. That is despite the healthy debate around just how natural the product really is.

That niche demand has helped it land deals to be included in some high-profile company’s products, such as PepsiCo’s reduced-sugar juice Trop50, in Coca-Cola’s Sprite on a test basis in France and Australia, and in some Danone yogurt products. Stevia still only has about 2 per cent of the global market in sweeteners by volume, but that’s doubled since last year. Euromonitor expects its growth to continue at a compound annual rate of 23 per cent from 2011 to 2016.

But that strategy can also be used against underdog brands. One of the most powerful ways for a company to protect its dominance is to fragment the market pre-emptively, giving challenger brands no niche to use as a foot in the door, said Niraj Dawar, a marketing professor at the Richard Ivey School of Business at the University of Western Ontario.
brands  Nike  Stevia  Susan_Krashinsky  Google  search  Bing  market_leadership  Microsoft  underdogs  branding  product_extensions  niches  fragmentation  customer_service  pre-emption  sweeteners  sub-brands  category_killers  habits  barriers_to_entry 
december 2012 by jerryking
Buy `Em Out, Then Build `Em Up -
May 07, 1995 | Businessweek |By Phillip L. Zweig in New York
LBOs  roll_ups  fragmentation 
july 2012 by jerryking
Opportunities for Entrepreneurs_Consolidating Fragmented Service Industries
Spring 1986 | New Management Vol. 3. Iss, 4; pg. 23. 5 pgs | Krauss, Carol Gibbons.

There are many opportunities for aspiring entrepreneurs to establish a successful business in the fragmented service industries. Reasons for fragmentation include: 1. the need for personal selling or delivery of a highly customized product, 2‘ local variations in environment or demand. and 3. inability to achieve economies of scale. Several possible strategies to overcome these fragmenting factors exist 1. Introduce a higher level of professionalism 2. Transform a service from a specialty into a commodity‘ 3. Separate portions of a mixed service and specialize in one aspect. 4. Change the delivery system by replacing some personal interaction with either automation or more customer participation To take advantage of these business opportunities. one must have a creative mind that is open to new organizational designs. The goal is to create a flexible formula that can be replicated
consolidation  entrepreneur  fragmentation  opportunities  personal_selling  small_business  start_ups  strategic_planning  economies_of_scale  fragmented_markets  roll_ups  professionalization 
july 2012 by jerryking
Marketing is Everything
January-February 1991 | HBR | Regis McKenna.

The relationships are the key, the basis of customer choice and company adaptation. After all, what is a successful brand but a special relationship?
marketing  HBR  product_extensions  fragmentation  product_strategy 
june 2012 by jerryking
Agriculture Focus
Agriculture Focus
December 16, 2011 | By KNews | Filed Under Editorial.

The initiative identifies several critical elements that must be confronted if agriculture is to deliver its potential to our economy. “These key elements are: agriculture is a business; agriculture is holistic, spanning the entire agri-product chain and with organic links to other productive sectors; the increasing importance of value-added food products and non-food products must be recognised; emphasis on national activities with sub-regional and regional activities included when they add value to national initiatives”.
Most importantly, ten constraints to agricultural development were identified. These were: limited financing and inadequate levels of new investments; outdated and inefficient Agricultural Health and Food Safety (AHFS) systems; inadequate research and development; a fragmented and disorganised private sector; weak land and water distribution and management systems; deficient and uncoordinated risk management measures; inadequate transportation systems, particularly for perishables; weak and non-Integrated information and intelligence systems; inadequate marketing arrangement and lack of skilled and quality human resources.
agriculture  Guyana  editorials  development  perishables  fragmentation  disorganization  challenges  farming  constraints  agribusiness  fresh_produce 
december 2011 by jerryking
Loblaw takes aim at rivals
Feb. 11, 2010 | The Globe & Mail | by Marina Strauss.
Loblaw Cos. Ltd., a trailblazer in low-cost private labels such as
President's Choice, is testing an array of new “discount” store brands
aimed at attracting more shoppers and fending off a legion of new
players in the grocery business. The strategy of promoting what some
retail experts refer to as “fighter” brands is similar to one being used
by grocery giant Tesco PLC in Britain to take on mighty Wal-Mart Stores
Inc. and other discounters. Now, Loblaw is borrowing a page from the
British private-label playbook by introducing a bevy of brands at its No
Frills discount stores, a move that could spiral into a new food fight
in Canada.

The move comes amid rising competition in the grocery sector. Retailers
ranging from Canadian Tire to Shoppers Drug Mart and Wal-Mart are adding
more food products to their shelves.
Marina_Strauss  grocery  private_labels  Loblaws  Wal-Mart  Tesco  retailers  sub-brands  product_extensions  niches  fragmentation  pre-emption  playbooks 
february 2010 by jerryking
Ambidextrous Marketing - WSJ.com
OCTOBER 11, 2005 | Wall Street Journal | by JOHN A. QUELCH.
(Charles Waud & WaudWare)
Many marketing managers are failing their employers, showing little
interest in the balance sheet impact of their promotional programs. Such
marketers lack the quantitative, analytical skills necessary to drive
marketing productivity; and resist being held accountable for marketing
performance. So what must a marketing manager be able to do to succeed
in a world where information rules?

* Start with gathering and analyzing basic data.
* Supplement and refine this big picture approach by analyzing the
profitability of each customer account.
* Even when you know which customers to target, today's media
fragmentation has increased the complexity of achieving an optimal
allocation of marketing expenditures.
* Measure what's important.
Today's boards want chief marketing officers who can talk the language
of productivity and return on investment and are willing to be held
accountable.
marketing  howto  ROI  managers  accountability  HBS  decision_making  growth_hacking  metrics  data_driven  CMOs  measurements  John_Quelch  fragmentation  advertising  the_big_picture 
january 2010 by jerryking

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