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jerryking : frameworks   66

The Bank of England future-proofs itself – MainStreetEcon
June 26, 2018 | Financial Times | by mainstreetecon 14 hours ago14 hours ago

[Future-proofing is the process of anticipating the future and developing methods of minimizing the effects of shocks and stresses of future events. ]
anticipating  Bank_of_England  central_banks  frameworks  future-proofing  monetary_policy  policymakers 
june 2018 by jerryking
5-Step Primer to Entering New Markets
| Inc.com | BY KARL STARK AND BILL STEWART, Co-founders, Avondale.

Expanding into a new market can be an effective way to leverage your core business for growth. But it takes a disciplined process to accurately assess the potential of each growth opportunity, because a bad bet can bog down your business.

Investing the appropriate level of resources in market analysis, selection, and entry method can create a foundation for success in the chosen market. We suggest following five steps to properly assess the opportunities and risks of a new market.

1. Define the Market
2. Perform Market Analysis
3. Assess Internal Capabilities
4. Prioritize and Select Markets
5. Develop Market Entry Options
marketing  growth  core_businesses  market_entry  new_markets  capabilities  frameworks  market_definition  market_analysis  self-assessment  market_opportunities  market_assessment  generating_strategic_options  assessments_&_evaluations  opportunities  Michael_McDerment  primers 
october 2016 by jerryking
At BlackRock, a Wall Street Rock Star’s $5 Trillion Comeback - The New York Times
SEPT. 15, 2016 | NYT | By LANDON THOMAS Jr.

(1) Laurence Fink: “If you think you know everything about our business, you are kidding yourself,” he said. “The biggest question we have to answer is: ‘Are we developing the right leaders?’” “Are you,” he asked, “prepared to be one of those leaders?”

(2) BlackRock was thriving because of its focus on low-risk, low-cost funds and the all-seeing wonders of Aladdin. BlackRock sees the future of finance as being rules-based, data-driven, systematic investment styles such as exchange-traded funds, which track a variety of stock and bond indexes or adhere to a set of financial rules. Fink believes that his algorithmic driven style will, over time, grow faster than the costlier “active investing” model in which individuals, not algorithms, make stock, bond and asset allocation decisions.

Most money management firms highlight their investment returns first, and risk controls second. BlackRock has taken a reverse approach: It believes that risk analysis, such as gauging how a security will trade if interest rates go up or down, improves investment results.

(3) BlackRock, along with central banks, sovereign wealth funds — have become the new arbiters of "flow.“ It is not about the flow of securities anymore, it is about the flow of information and indications of interest.”

(4) Asset Liability and Debt and Derivatives Investment Network (Aladdin), is BlackRock's big data-mining, risk-mitigation platform/framework. Aladdin is a network of code, trades, chat, algorithms and predictive models that on any given day can highlight vulnerabilities and opportunities connected to the trillions that BlackRock firm tracks — including the portion which belongs to outside firms that pay BlackRock a fee to have access to the platform. Aladdin stress-tests how securities will respond to certain situations (e.g. a sudden rise in interest rates or what happens in the event of a political surprise, like Donald J. Trump being elected president.)

In San Francisco, a team of equity analysts deploys data analysis to study the language that CEOs use during an earnings call. Unusually bearish this quarter, compared with last? If so, maybe the stock is a sell. “We have more information than anyone,” Mr. Fink said.
systematic_approaches  ETFs  Wall_Street  BlackRock  Laurence_Fink  asset_management  traders  complacency  future  finance  Aladdin  risk-management  financiers  financial_services  central_banks  money_management  information_flows  volatility  economic_downturn  liquidity  bonds  platforms  frameworks  stress-tests  monitoring  CEOs  succession  risk-analysis  leadership  order_management_system  sovereign_wealth_funds  market_intelligence  intentionality  data_mining  collective_intelligence  risk-mitigation  rules-based  risks  asset_values  scaling  scenario-planning  databases 
september 2016 by jerryking
Winning in the Business of Sports
November 2014 | A.T. Kearney | by Hervé Collignon and Nicolas Sultan.
A.T._Kearney  sports  marketing  ecosystems  frameworks  entertainment_industry 
april 2016 by jerryking
The United States shouldn’t take sides in the Sunni-Shiite struggle - The Washington Post
By Fareed Zakaria Opinion writer

...the most significant trend shaping the region today is something different: Sunnis vs. Shiites. That sectarian struggle now infects almost every aspect of the region’s politics....Though there always was tension, Sunnis and Shiites did live in peace, for the most part, until recently.....The pivotal shift took place in 1979. The Islamic Revolution in Iran brought to power an aggressively religious ruling class, determined to export its ideas and support Shiites in the region.....Saudi Arabia is facing a series of challenges, from the Islamic State to domestic extremists. The country’s large and active social media are dominated by radical Islamists. And as oil prices plunge, government revenue has collapsed, and the nation’s generous subsidies to its people will be hard to sustain. The regime needs greater legitimacy.
Fareed_Zakaria  Sunni  Shiites  schisms  Middle_East  U.S.foreign_policy  frameworks  sectarian  religion  trends  Iran  Wahhabism  extremism  Yemen  geopolitics  Saudi_Arabia 
january 2016 by jerryking
Mastering the Art of Problem Solving
When President Bill Clinton chose to intervene in the Somali civil war in 1993, the Battle of Mogadishu resulted in thousands of Somali citizens killed, two American Black Hawk helicopters shot down,…

WHAT ABOUT THE DATA?
Increasing amounts of data can be unmanageable, and the problem of sorting through data overloads may only worsen in this digital era. Rather than looking at each bit of information as a discrete data point, we want to look at our drivers and sort the data according to which driver it supports--on other words, sort the data into each of the half-dozen or so driver categories, so analysts have few piles to deal with rather than a thousand discrete data points.
decision_making  howto  problem_solving  problem_framing  security_&_intelligence  CIA  books  information_overload  analysis  interviews  critical_thinking  book_reviews  Philip_Mudd  frameworks  insights  sorting  analysts  thinking_backwards  problem_definition  intelligence_analysts 
may 2015 by jerryking
From Andreessen, a Lesson in Corporate Finance - NYTimes.com
By WILLIAM ALDEN APRIL 17, 2014

In a series of tweets on Thursday, Mr. Andreessen offered a framework for thinking about technology valuations — relying on metrics that hard-nosed financiers tend not to consider.

3/Value of company X to acquirer Y often = Potential impact to acquirer Y's business -- which has a lot more to do with Y than X.

4/For example, in product businesses, you'll often hear term "attach rate" -- acquirer Y can attach company X's product to Y's sales engine.

5/Ex: I sell $20B of servers/year; I buy storage company X doing $100M revenue/year; & I can attach X's product to 20% of my server sales.

6/Ex cont'd: I can generate new $20B*20% = $4B/year of storage sales attached to my server business. X's standalone revenue is irrelevant.

7/Ex cont'd: So I can pay up for storage company X based on its projected impact on MY business, way beyond X's independent valuation.
Marc_Andreessen  Andreessen_Horowitz  corporate_finance  start_ups  valuations  standalone  frameworks  software  mergers_&_acquisitions  M&A 
june 2014 by jerryking
Personal Data: The Emergence of a New Asset Class
January 2011 | An Initiative of the World Economic Forum
In Collaboration with Bain & Company, Inc
data  mydata  frameworks  privacy  Industrial_Internet  Bain  asset_classes 
july 2013 by jerryking
Good News and Bad News: THE STRATEGY CONSULTING VALUE CHAIN IS BREAKING UP
March 2005 | Consulting to Management |by SASCHA L. SCHMIDT, PATRICK VOGT, ANSGAR RICHTER.

I retrieved this article in connection with a-connect interview
strategy  management_consulting  value_chains  frameworks  disaggregation  McKinsey  bad_news 
january 2013 by jerryking
Beyond strategic control: Applying the Balanced Scorecard to a Religious Organization
2001 | Journal of Nonprofit & Public Sector Marketing |John C Keyt.

Kaplan and Norton (1992) have provided a framework to link control to an organization 's vision - the balanced scorecard. This approach provides measures in four areas: 1. customer, 2. internal business, 3. innovation and learning, and 4. financial. This article provides a starting point in adapting this method to a church by looking at four measurement perspectives: 1. members/attenders, 2. internal ministry processes, 3. ministering, and 4. innovation and learning. An example is then developed using a church's mission and vision statement.
balanced_scorecard  churches  religion  frameworks  nonprofit  best_practices 
january 2013 by jerryking
Competitive Analysis for Competitive Advantage
(Charles Waud & WaudWare)
Who are my relevant competitors?
What are the criteria to determine customer value creation?
What are the priorities for competition?
Compared to the leading competitors, how do we look on each criterion?
On which criteria are we better?
On which criteria are they better?
How can we better position ourselves on our "strong" criteria?
How can we improve the customer's perception of our "weak" criteria?
Where should we allocate resources?
Where will future changes come from in my competitor's strategies?
On what key customer "value criteria" will they change?
How can we anticipate these changes and "reposition" our strategy most effectively?
Ivey  frameworks  competitive_advantage  market_segmentation  Five_Forces_model  value_chains  competitive_strategy  strategy  products  product_strategy  competitive_intelligence  experiece_curves  cost_analysis  comparative_advantage  customer_segmentation 
december 2012 by jerryking
A Methodological Framework to Design and Assess Food Traceability Systems
Volume 15, Issue 1, 2012 |International Food and Agribusiness Management Review| by Mhamed Bendaouda, Catherine Lecomteb, and Bernard Yannouc
traceability  food  frameworks  agribusiness 
october 2012 by jerryking
Introduction to the Case Method
(1) Define the central problem. (Problems vs. symptoms, sequence, linkages)
(2) Formulate the alternatives. (3 or 4 are usually sufficient. Include maintenance of the status quo).
(3) Analyze the alternatives. (Uncover the nature, proportion, function, and underlying relationships among a set of variables). Lay out assumptions. Review assumptions to see how dependent conclusions are on the assumptions made. Contingency plans in the case that assumptions don't hold. Opposing arguments addressed? Pros/cons of each alternative.
(4) Recommend a solution. (Make it clear cut. Avoid qualifications)
(5) Specify a plan of action. (Potential reactions)
(6) Prepare contingency plans.
case_studies  business_schools  symptoms  howto  frameworks  problem_framing  problem_solving  linkages  marketing_math  critical_thinking  action_plans  contingency_planning  alternatives  assumptions  argumentation  sequencing 
july 2012 by jerryking
Technology Implementation and Project Risk
You have to make sure your whole team understands what scarce resource you’re optimizing.
implementation  execution  R&D  testing  risk-assessment  project_management  frameworks 
july 2012 by jerryking
Winning Market Leadership: A Guide for Marketing Plans
December 1996 | Ivey | Terry Deutscher.

Define the arena:
- by customer group,
- by customer benefit
- by technology
- by value-added role

Identifying Attractive opportunities
uUnderstanding the market
Fit with Core capabilities
Competitive Analysis
Ivey  marketing  business_planning  frameworks 
july 2012 by jerryking
A Mindset, Not a Technology | Folio: The Magazine for Magazine Management | Find Articles
Dec 15, 1999 | Folio: The Magazine for Magazine Management | Tony Silber.

But technology improvements only enable. They're a means, not the end. The real commitment has to be a companywide understanding of how valuable a fully developed database marketing operation is--especially for magazine publishers, who, because of their lists, already have a rather sophisticated picture of their customers. Database marketing--data mining, data warehousing, one-to-one marketing, whatever you want to call it--is really a mindset, an approach, a framework for doing business. And it remains, to me at least, unclear how many publishing companies are really maximizing the inherent, but often latent, value of their databases. That's why we decided to do this issue.
data  data_driven  databases  marketing  frameworks  Condé_Nast  mindsets  latent  companywide 
july 2012 by jerryking
New Rules for Bringing Innovations to Market
March 2004 | HBR | Bhaskar Chakravorti.

The more networked a market is, the harder it is for an innovation to take hold, writes Bhaskar Chakravorti, who leads Monitor Group's practice on strategies for growth and managing uncertainty through the application of game theory. Chakravorti argues that executives need to rethink the way they bring innovations to market, specifically by orchestrating behavior change across the market, so that a large number of players adopt their offerings and believe they are better off for having done so. He outlines a four-part framework for doing just that: The innovator must reason back from a target endgame, implementing only those strategies that maximize its chances of getting to its goal. It must complement power players, positioning its innovation as an enhancement to their products or services. The innovator must offer coordinated switching incentives to three core groups: the players that add to the innovation's benefits, the players that act as channels to adopters and the adopters themselves. And it must preserve flexibility in case its initial strategy fails.

Chakravorti uses Adobe's introduction of its Acrobat software as an example of an innovator that took into account other players in the network--and succeeded because of it. As more content became available in Acrobat format, more readers were motivated to download the program," he observes. "The flexibility in Acrobat's product structure and the segmentation in the market allowed the pricing elasticity that resulted in the software's widespread adoption."
HBR  innovation  networks  network_effects  rules_of_the_game  commercialization  monetization  product_launches  howto  growth  managing_uncertainty  cloud_computing  endgame  Adobe  uncertainty  switching_costs  jump-start  platforms  orchestration  ecosystems  big_bang  behaviours  behavioral_change  frameworks  sharing_economy  customer_adoption  thinking_backwards  new_categories  early_adopters  distribution_channels  work-back_schedules 
july 2012 by jerryking
Purchasing a Business: The Search Process
Oct 08, 1987 | Harvard Business Review |by Michael J. Roberts, Ennis J. Walton.

Describes the steps necessary to purchase a small to medium size company. Provides an eight-part analytical framework. Issues covered in the framework include the following: the self-assessment, deal criteria, deal sources, resources necessary to purchase a business, the deal process, the evaluation process, negotiating the deal, and adding value and harvesting the venture.
buying_a_business  HBR  frameworks  criteria 
june 2012 by jerryking
Knowing a Winning Business Idea When You See One
September-October 2000 | HBR | by W. Chan Kim and Renée Mauborgne.

We've created three analytic tools to help managers know a winning business idea when they see one—whatever the market space it occupies or creates. The first tool, “the buyer utility map,” indicates the likelihood that customers will be attracted to the new idea. The second tool, “the price corridor of the mass,” identifies what price will unlock the greatest number of customers. The third tool, “the business model guide,” offers a framework for figuring out whether and how a company can profitably deliver the new idea at the targeted price.
HBR  ideas  frameworks 
june 2012 by jerryking
Planning for and Implementing a Product Recall
July 2007 | Defense Counsel Journal | David G. Wix; Peter J. Mone

* The importance of foreseeing and planning for multijurisdiction product recalls cannot be overemphasized.
* Product recalls can present a major crisis for a manufacturer, potentially involving adverse media publicity, and in the case of a public company, a negative effect on stock price. A product recall that is not handled properly, effectively, and efficiently can result in permanent damage to the product brand, reduced profits, and loss of reputation and goodwill with consumers.
* The immediate priority of every product recall should be to bring the product risk to the attention of affected consumers and to enable them to adopt the company's chosen corrective measures as quickly as possible.

I. Before a Safety Issue Arises

A. Plan for a Global Product Recall In Advance
B. Learn and Improve From Past Recalls
C. Know Your Products: How They Are Made and Where They Are Distributed

II. Once a Safety Issue Arises
A. Take Action As Soon As You Learn of a Potential Safety Issue
B. Understand the Risk - And Be Prepared To Defend Your Decision Whether To Recall

III. Implementing a Product Recall
A. Select the Most Appropriate Communication Methods
B. Make the Recall Easy for Customers
C. Get the Notification Right the First Time
D. Coordinate Across Jurisdictions
E. Monitor Progress

IV. Conclusion
ProQuest  product_recalls  anticipating  frameworks  crisis 
june 2012 by jerryking
A_Framework_for_Data_and_Information_sharing_for_ARD_Ajit_Maru.pdf (application/pdf Object)
A Framework for Data and Information sharing for
Agricultural Research for Development: A perspective for its
development
_________________________________________
Ajit Maru
Global Forum on Agricultural Research Secretariat
frameworks  agriculture 
june 2012 by jerryking
Note on Deal Making
1994 | The University of Western Ontario | Steve Suarez and Jim hatch
deal-making  Ivey  funding  finance  investing  frameworks  dealmakers 
may 2012 by jerryking
Intellectual property is a new kind of arms race, with patents as ammo - The Globe and Mail
john manley
From Wednesday's Globe and Mail
Oct. 05, 2011 .

​To spur innovation and economic growth, Canada needs an intellectual property framework that fairly balances the rights of creators, consumers and society as a whole. In addition to passing a new copyright bill, the federal government should undertake a comprehensive IP policy review to address barriers that hinder opportunities for companies and inventors. Such a review, says the Canadian International Council, should examine “how much of an obstacle our corporations face when obtaining licences from Canadian patent holders, and the extent to which this barrier impedes innovation and growth.”

Of equal importance is the need to improve the quality of patents issued in Canada and internationally. By some estimates, close to a third of all new U.S. patents are of questionable quality, often because the invention claimed is not new or because the patent is vague or overly broad. One way to address this is to make it easier for third parties to challenge these applications without resorting to litigation.

At the same time, it’s vital to speed up the patent application process. Obtaining a patent now takes as many as three years in Canada, 3½ years in the U.S. and a decade in Europe. As the CIC points out, “Such delays hurt innovation, particularly in the informative-technology sector, where the commercial value of a patent may last only a year or two.”
John_Manley  CCCE  intellectual_property  patent_law  patent_trolls  patents  frameworks  arms_race 
october 2011 by jerryking
Social netting - the whats and whys (2) | Office Jotter
By: Roger Whitehead, Director, Office Futures
Published: 27th August 2009
social_media  value_propositions  case_studies  Igloo  frameworks 
march 2011 by jerryking
How Angel Investors Get Their Wings
April 17, 2008 | Business Week | by Chris Farrell. "While many
angels are current or former entrepreneurs, and that background can
prove invaluable, they also need to develop investing skills. The
successful angel adheres to the same disciplines that make for a good
investor, from Berkshire Hathaway's ("BRK-A") Warren Buffett to Yale
University's David Swensen. Understand the risks. Follow an intellectual
framework. Have a well-thought-out methodology for buying and selling.
Do due diligence. Diversify. "Angel investing isn't easy, and it's very
high risk," says Tony Stanco, executive director of both the National
Council of Entrepreneurial Tech Transfer and of Angel Investors of
Greater Washington. "But it's high reward." "
angels  David_Swensen  diversification  due_diligence  frameworks  high-reward  investing  investors  process-orientation  risks  self-discipline  systematic_approaches  Warren_Buffett 
december 2010 by jerryking
Four VCs on Evaluating Opportunities
May 2, 2005 | HBS Working Knowledge | by Mike Roberts and
Lauren Barley. What makes for the ideal entrepreneurial opportunity?
To learn about the frameworks firms use when evaluating potential
venture opportunities, Mike Roberts, executive director of the Arthur
Rock Center for Entrepreneurship, and HBS senior research associate
Lauren Barley recently interviewed four venture capitalists from leading
firms in Silicon Valley.
vc  venture_capital  opportunities  frameworks  HBR  start_ups  entrepreneurship  evaluations  assessments_&_evaluations 
december 2010 by jerryking
How to master the art of thinking quickly on your feet
July 10, 2004 | The Globe and Mail | by Virginia Galt. (1)
Think brevity (2) Think structure (3) Think threes (4) Think movement.
BS3M |
Think brevity

Be aware that your audience values you getting to the point. They value complex ideas being explained simply. Everyone suffers from information overload. If you don't get to the point, you're adding to the overload.

Think structure

Place some kind of framework into your communication so that your audience can see you are organized and have thought about your answer. You have focused your answer into something digestible, something an audience can absorb. It forces you into brevity and clarity.

Think threes

Strong verbal messages require focus. They also require substance. One item is not enough. Seventeen items is too many. Three items is enough for you, and your audience, to retain. Three items forces you to focus on what is really important. It also focuses your audience on only having listen to three. Remember your audience's attention span.

Think movement

Demonstrate your mental ability to be logical, and to move your audience through that logic. What if someone asks a question to which you do not know the answer?
brevity  Communicating_&_Connecting  concision  frameworks  strategic_thinking  improvisation  filetype:pdf  media:document  public_speaking  speeches  Virginia_Galt  structure  clarity  think_threes 
november 2009 by jerryking
A road map to risk management
Dec 2001 | Journal of Accountancy. Vol. 192, Iss. 6; pg. 65,
5 pgs. | by Stephen W Bodine, Anthony Pugliese, Paul L Walker.
Businesses must measure risks, try to minimize them and - if possible -
use them to their advantage. This article describes a generic framework
or set of steps for risk management - based on current best practices -
that is applicable to any size or type of organization.
Employer_of_Choice  employer_branding  metrics  roadmaps  risks  Freshbooks  onboarding  risk-management  frameworks  measurements 
october 2009 by jerryking
Preparing for the Next Crisis: Preventing the Next Fire While This One Blazes
MARCH 12, 2009 WSJ column by by DAVID WESSEL. Identifies some
fundamental questions that should be addressed as officials think
through improvements to the financial regulatory framework.

Preventing all future crises is not the goal. That would be the equivalent of banning stoves and furnaces: We'd have fewer destructive fires but we'd be cold and miserable. The goal is to prevent mishaps from burning down the world economy. Here are three of the threshold questions that need pondering:

(1) Who shall be saved, and who shall be allowed to die?

(2) How paternalistic should regulation be, and who should be the parent?

(3) Can we install air bags in the financial system that deploy automatically?
financial_institutions  frameworks  regulation  David_Wessel  hard_choices  think_threes  financial_system  regulators  questions  crisis  preparation  circuit_breakers  hard_questions 
march 2009 by jerryking
reportonbusiness.com: Innovators' aids: Tools to help unlock ideas
February 11, 2009 by HARVEY SCHACHTER, Special to The Globe and Mail, reviews two books that offer frameworks for innovation.
innovation  book_reviews  Harvey_Schachter  frameworks 
february 2009 by jerryking

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