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jerryking : freelancing   44

Past mistakes carry warnings for the future of work
May 21, 2019 | Financial Times | by SARAH O'CONNOR.

* Data can mislead unless combined with grittier insights on the power structures that underpin it.
* William Kempster, a master mason who worked on St Paul's Cathedral in the 18th century, left wage records that helped expose a flaw in our understanding of the past.

It is often said that we should learn from the mistakes of the past. But we can also learn from the mistakes we make about the past. Seemingly smooth data can mislead unless it is combined with a grittier insight into the structures, contracts and power relationships that underpin the numbers. On that score, economists and politicians who want to make sense of today’s labour market have an advantage over historians: it is happening right now, just outside their offices, in all its complexity and messiness. All they have to do is open the door
17th_century  18th_century  builders  contextual  data  datasets  developing_countries  economic_history  economists  freelancing  gig_economy  handwritten  historians  human_cloud_platforms  insights  labour_markets  London  messiness  mistakes  politicians  power_relations  power_structures  record-keeping  United_Kingdom  unstructured_data  wages  white-collar 
may 2019 by jerryking
Insurance and the gig economy - Your policy is arriving in three minutes
Apr 5th 2018 |

In the longer term insurers face a more fundamental challenge: disintermediation. Airbnb, a platform for booking stays in private homes, has offered a “host guarantee” against theft and vandalism since 2011. Although it works like insurance, no specialist firm is involved. Airbnb makes payouts itself. Curtis Scott of Uber boasts that the firm is “perhaps the most educated purchaser of insurance ever”. It does a lot of the calculations for pricing and underwriting its insurance risk, and has a potential sales platform in the form of its app. For Uber and its peers, the next step could be to expand their gig offerings into insurance.
Airbnb  disintermediation  gig_economy  insurance  freelancing  Uber 
july 2018 by jerryking
Gig economy is not watching out for the wellbeing of workers
"There is no utopian world where the gig economy provides for the worker, where everyone can magically create their own software, or where the government provides benefits to gig workers -- as if getting Congress to pass such controversial and costly reform can be done at the snap of Mr. Harford's fingers!" ...."He encourages everyone to be a "supermodel", using Linda Evangelista as a poster child for stating that she would not "wake up for less than $10,000 a day" when most of the workers he is talking about hardly have an autonomy or stability whatsoever."...."Uber's high revenues do not translate to drivers' earnings"......Without an employer providing benefits and watching out for an employee's wellbeing, both mentally and financially, gig workers are leaving their families and their futures exposed"
letters_to_the_editor  Tim_Harford  gig_economy  precarious  freelancing  self-employment  independent_contractors  employee_benefits  Uber  Pablo_Picasso  inconsistent_incomes 
august 2017 by jerryking
Think like a supermodel to wrest control of the gig economy | Evernote Web
July 13, 2017 | Financial Times | Tim Harford.

Smartphones have allowed companies such as Uber and Deliveroo to take critical management functions--motivating staff, evaluating and rewarding performance, scheduling and coordination--and replace them with an algorithm.....But gig workers could install their own software, telling it where they like to work, what they like to do, when they’re available, unavailable, or open to persuasion. My app — call it GigBot — could talk to the Lyft app and the TaskRabbit app and the Deliveroo app, and interrupt me only when an offer deserves attention.

Not every job can be broken down into microtasks that can be rented out by the minute, but we might be surprised at how many can. Remember that old line from supermodel Linda Evangelista, “We don’t wake up for less than $10,000 a day”? GigBot will talk to your alarm clock; $10 or $10,000, just name the price that would tempt you from your lie-in.

It is easy to imagine a dystopian scenario in which a few companies hook us in like slot-machine addicts, grind us in circles like cogs, and pimp us around for pennies. But it is not too hard to imagine a world in which skilled workers wrest back control using open-source software agents, join electronic guilds or unions and enjoy a serious income alongside unprecedented autonomy.

Nothing empowers a worker like the ability to walk out and take a better offer; in principle the gig economy offers exactly that. Indeed both scenarios may come true simultaneously, with one type of gig for the lucky ones, and another for ordinary folk.

If we are to take the best advantage of a true gig economy, we need to prepare for more radical change. Governments have been content to use corporations as delivery mechanisms for benefits that include pensions, parental leave, sick leave, holidays and sometimes healthcare — not to mention the minimum wage. This isn’t unreasonable; even a well-paid freelancer may be unable to buy decent private insurance or healthcare. Many of us struggle to save for a pension. But if freelancers really do start to dominate economic activity — if — the idea of providing benefits mostly through employers will break down.

We will need governments to provide essential benefits, perhaps minimalist, perhaps generous, to all citizens. Above that safety net, we need portable benefits — mentioned warmly but briefly by Mr Taylor — so that even a 10-minute gig helps to fill a pension pot or earn time towards a holiday. Traditional corporate jobs have been socially useful, but if you push any model too far from reality, it will snap.
Tim_Harford  gig_economy  mobile_applications  Lyft  TaskRabbit  Deliveroo  freelancing  self-employment  independent_contractors 
july 2017 by jerryking
The Pop-Up Employer: Build a Team, Do the Job, Say Goodbye -
JULY 12, 2017 | The New York Times | By NOAM SCHEIBER.

Two Stanford biz profs, Melissa Valentine and Michael Bernstein, have introduced the idea of “flash organizations” — ephemeral setups to execute a single, complex project in ways traditionally associated with corporations, nonprofit groups or governments.....information technology has made the flash organization a suddenly viable form across a number of industries.....intermediaries are already springing up across industries like software and pharmaceuticals to assemble such organizations. They rely heavily on data and algorithms to determine which workers are best suited to one another, and also on decidedly lower-tech innovations, like middle management......Temporary organizations capable of taking on complicated projects have existed for decades, e.g. Hollywood, where producers assemble teams of directors, writers, actors, costume and set designers and a variety of other craftsmen and technicians to execute projects with budgets in the tens if not hundreds of millions.....Jody Miller, a former media executive and venture capitalist, a co-founder of the Business Talent Group, sets up temporary teams of freelancers for corporations. “We’re the producers,” Ms. Miller said. “We understand how to evaluate talent, pick the team.”.....
Three lessons stand out across the flash-type models. First is that the platforms tend to be highly dependent on data and computing power....Second is the importance of well-established roles. ...Third, there is perhaps the least likely of innovations: middle management. The typical freelancer performs worker-bee tasks. Flash-like organizations tend to combine both workers and managers...........Flash organizations have obvious limits....they tend to work best for projects with well-defined life spans, not continuing engagements....“The bottleneck now is project managers,” ... “It’s a really tough position to fill.”.....even while fostering flexibility, the model could easily compound insecurity. Temporary firms are not likely to provide health or retirement benefits. ..... the anxiety is legitimate, but these platforms could eventually dampen insecurity by playing a role that companies have historically played: providing benefits, topping off earnings if workers’ freelance income is too low or too spotty, even allowing workers to organize.
pop-ups  freelancing  on-demand  ephemerality  producers  execution  Hollywood  project_management  teams  data  algo  lessons_learned  Business_Talent_Group  Gigster  Artella  Foundry  Slack  pharmaceutical_industry  Outsourcing  contractors  job_insecurity  middle_management  gig_economy  ad_hoc  dissolutions  short-term  short-lived 
july 2017 by jerryking
11 tips for freelance success
Thanks in part to globalisation and the state of the world economy, the number of
freelancers and freelance opportunities have grown rapidly in the past
decade.
For individuals, freelancing offers the possibility of an
entrepreneurial lifestyle and a level of self-determination that is hard
to find at a nine-to-five.

For businesses that may not have the luxury
of hiring a full-time employee or need expertise that is hard to find
and/or develop in-house, retaining a freelancer may be the most
attractive way to get a job done.

But freelancing isn't all roses. Most individuals who become freelancers
aren't billing themselves out at thousands of dollars a day, and many
fail to earn more than they used to earn (or could
earn) as full-time employees.

Some, sadly, are unable to find their way
and are forced out of freelance-dom.
For those wanting to 'make it', here are 11 life-saving tips.

Dot your i's and cross your t's
While few freelancers like dealing with legal issues and attorneys, having a formal agreement in place for each gig can help protect you against non-payment and avoidable legal headaches.

As such, savvy freelancers will seek out competent legal counsel early on, and at a minimum, invest in the drafting of a solid template agreement that can be applied to common projects.

Demand a deposit for every project
New freelancers in particular are often hesitant to require an up-front deposit from clients, believing that it will cost them business. But the truth is that no reasonable client will refuse to pay a reasonable deposit, making the deposit one of the best tools for filtering out the clients most likely to be deadbeats.

Once a long-term client relationship is established, it may be appropriate to consider alternate arrangements, but it's wise to treat those arrangements as you would a loan that doesn't require a down payment.

In other words, understand what you could lose if the loan is not repaid, and make sure that loss is tolerable.

Don't get distracted by the "hourly versus fixed price" debate
While it's not always the case, the general belief is that freelancers love hourly engagements and clients love fixed price engagements.

At the end of the day, however, the "hourly versus fixed price" debate is usually a red herring. If you're billing hourly for a project, your client is going to want an estimate of how many hours the project will take to complete.

And if you're billing a fixed amount for a project, you're going to base the amount on an hourly rate and the number of hours you believe the project will take to complete.
The key is making sure that you have enough information to establish the scope of the work required, and that you have enough skill to accurately estimate work time based on scope.

If scope isn't established and/or you're not capable of estimating accurately, the project is at risk regardless of whether you're billing by the hour or for the whole shebang.

Invoice well, invoice religiously
One of the most common reasons individuals fail at freelancing is that they don't generate the cash they need when they need it. In other words, they have clients and gigs, but it's a constant struggle to pay the bills.

Many freelancers find the lesson that strong revenue does not necessarily equate to strong cash flow to be a harsh one, but once learned, it's much easier to address the matter.

Building strong cash flow starts with invoicing. First, you need to set fair if not favorable invoicing terms (hint: net 45 or 60, or higher, can be painful).

Then, you actually need to submit your invoices in a timely fashion (eg. when they're able to be submitted or due), something that, surprisingly, many freelancers fail to do even though there are plenty of cost-effective tools that can make the process easy.

Minimize your ratio of new client acquisition to billable work
Freelancing can be very profitable -- when you're billing. But many freelancers spend a lot of time not billing, and for many of these freelancers, new client acquisition is the biggest source of non-billable time.

It shouldn't be. While you probably don't want to be dependent on one or two clients, if you're spending more than 25-30% of your time each month looking for new ones, you may eventually find it hard to be successful.

Find your optimal rate
One of the best ways to minimize the amount of new client acquisition you need to engage in is to find your optimal rate and pricing structure. Charge too little and you'll find it hard to thrive. Charge too much, however, and you'll find that your clients may send you a lot less work than they'd otherwise like to.
At the end of the day, finding your optimal rate is effectively the same thing as maximizing your revenue. A freelancer who bills 120 hours a month at $100/hour makes more money than a freelancer who bills 60 at $150/hour, and incidentally, is probably more likely to be staying sharp and working on interesting things.

Focus on what you do best and what you want to do, not on what you can do
Many freelancers make a huge mistake: they make their sole criteria for taking on a project the answer to the question, "Can I do this, and make money?" Instead, it pays to focus on what you do best and take on work that's aligned with your long-term positioning and goals.

Everything else can distract you from getting to where you want to go, even if it helps pay a few bills in the short-term.

Be realistic about scale
Service businesses have unique scaling challenges, and individual freelancers will obviously find it difficult to grow revenue beyond their hourly rate times the number of hours in a working day.

For ambitious, established freelancers, building a team or outsourcing may seem like a good way to grow revenue. But growing the number of hours you can bill in this fashion and maintaining quality can be very difficult to do.

Also consider that this type of expansion may force you to do more project management, so make sure your project management skills are sufficient and, more importantly, than you're willing to trade some of your 'real' work for project management.

Don't underestimate the importance of location
The stereotypical freelancer lifestyle can be attractive, but don't get too infatuated with the notion that you can live on the beach in some exotic, inexpensive land while billing out design or development work at London day rates.

The market for freelancers is competitive, and location can matter. If the majority of your clients are based in, say, New York, and you're based in Phuket, the distance between you and your clients could eventually become a major liability.

Don't be afraid to part ways with clients
Few things are as rewarding than long-term client relationships. But that doesn't mean that you should maintain a client relationship for the sake of maintaining the relationship.

If a once-solid client becomes a headache (eg. they're not paying you on time or are treating you disrespectfully), you shouldn't feel obligated to keep providing your services. And sometimes, your areas of focus may diverge from a client's needs.

In these cases, doing what's right for you (moving on), as difficult as it may be, is probably also what needs to be done if you're going to do right by your client.

Become a business owner
Most freelancers start off thinking of themselves as a 'freelancers', but at some point, a successful freelancer should recognize that she's really a business owner.

That means learning about, and taking responsibility for, business activities like bookkeeping, accounting and marketing. Doing this can often mean the difference between success and failure, as there are many talented freelancers who fail to succeed because they're poor business owners.

As an example, consider the importance of building a cash position. A good business owner will try to build a solid cash position, as this can provide a safety net for a rainy day, expansion capital, or the ability to offer more flexible payment terms to clients.

A freelancer who is not a good business owner, on the other hand, is less likely to think of her freelancing operation as a business for which a strong cash position is desirable or necessary.
aligned_interests  charge_for_something  emergency_funds  freelancing  gig_economy  hard_to_find  jck  owners  safety_nets  screening  via:Memeserver 
december 2016 by jerryking
How to develop and manage freelancers - The Globe and Mail
GAIL JOHNSON
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Nov. 11, 2016
freelancing  gig_economy  howto 
november 2016 by jerryking
LinkedIn Enters The Gig Economy With An Upwork Competitor
08.24.16 | | Fast Company | Business + Innovation | SARAH KESSLER.
LinkedIn  freelancing  gig_economy  Thumbtack  Upwork 
october 2016 by jerryking
Why I Tell My MBA Students to Stop Looking for a Job and Join the Gig Economy
Diane Mulcahy
OCTOBER 20, 2016

....Full-time employees are the most expensive and least flexible source of labor, qualities that make them unattractive to corporate America and Silicon Valley startups alike....cultivate the mindset, skills, and toolkit to succeed in this new world of independent work....companies are increasingly disaggregating work from a job. ....
gig_economy  job_search  students  freelancing  on-demand  Outsourcing  digital_economy  books  HBR 
october 2016 by jerryking
Why Self-Help Guru James Altucher Only Owns 15 Things
AUG. 6, 2016 | The New York Times | By ALEX WILLIAMS.

there has never been a better time to choose yourself, he said.

You do not have to be Mark Zuckerberg, he said, to be an entrepreneur. “You can learn basic web development,” he said. “You can go to Codeacademy.com, learn the basic skills in three months, then sell them on Freelancer.com, where there are millions of jobs. I know 15-year-olds who are making a few thousand dollars a month.”
self-help  James_Altucher  authors  freelancing  software_development 
august 2016 by jerryking
The Rise of the On-Demand Economy - The CIO Report - WSJ
March 13, 2015| WSJ | By IRVING WLADAWSKY-BERGER.

we are seeing the rise of what The Economist called the On-Demand Economy in a recent article....Manufacturing jobs have been automated out of existence or outsourced abroad, while big companies have abandoned lifetime employment. Some 53m American workers already work as freelancers....now the sharing economy is evolving into something new. Ubiquitous communications, freelance work forces and low transaction costs are giving rise to the on-demand company, which aims to apply the principles of Uber or Airbnb to a much broader range of markets....A well-managed company strives to achieve an optimal balance between what work gets done within and outside its boundaries.

Advances in information and communication technologies are having a huge impact on the structure of companies....Where is the future of work heading in such an economy? “Freelance workers available at a moment’s notice will reshape the nature of companies and the structure of careers,”...Ubiquitous communications and very low transaction costs are giving rise to a new class of firm, the on-demand company. These firms aim to efficiently bring together consumers and suppliers of goods and services with their highly scalable platforms and innovative applications...
digital_economy  sharing_economy  Uber  Lyft  Ronald_Coase  Coase's_Law  transaction_costs  freelancing  on-demand  Outsourcing  gig_economy  Irving_Wladawsky-Berger 
march 2015 by jerryking
A radical rethink of ‘decision factories’
Nov. 17 2013 | The Globe and Mail | HARVEY SCHACHTER.

In regular factories, employees are consumed by repetitive daily tasks. But in decision factories, the focus is on project work. Whether it’s developing an advertising campaign or preparing a budget or coming up with a new product, knowledge workers operate in project mode. “You often hear in organizations the rhetoric that a project is taking away from the job. But most white-collar work is projects,” he said in an interview.

However, that isn’t recognized by companies or their staff. Instead of organizing work around projects, it is organized around jobs. Essentially, each job is based on the amount of work a person faces at their busiest moment – on projects, actually. But when that project is completed, workers aren’t immediately transferred to a new venture, since the just-finished project is seen as something they took on for a time. They return to their normal work, now quite reduced, between projects.

Mr. Martin drawns an analogy to power plants, which are built to handle peak demand on the hottest day in July, even though for much of the year they operate at much lower demand. “Organizations do that with people: They staff to peak load. Since people don’t want to seem not busy in slack periods, they fill it up with various initiatives. That’s why the day before the 10,000 people are let go, it seems like you need them all. But you really don’t,” he said .

In his article, he cited the example of a marketing vice-president, who is busy during the launch of an important project or when a competitive threat arises. But between those events, she will have few decisions to make, and may have little to do . The same is true throughout the knowledge factory.

The key to breaking the binge-and-purge cycle in knowledge work and making more efficient use of employees, Mr. Martin argues, is to redefine the employment contract and hire people for project work rather than specific jobs. He believes that in such a framework, we would need only 70 per cent of the people we currently have in a given decision factory.

So instead of being hired to handle a specific job for 52 weeks of the year, people would be hired for a specific level of work. They would still be working for the full year – they aren’t freelancers or contract workers – but would be scheduled to different projects and work with different leaders.
Harvey_Schachter  Roger_Martin  HBR  projects  knowledge_workers  project_management  project_work  employment_contracts  freelancing  gig_economy  peak_load  peak_demand  busywork  binge-and-purge_cycles  on-demand 
november 2013 by jerryking
Tackling Concerns of Independent Workers
By STEVEN GREENHOUSE
Published: March 23, 2013
The Freelancers Union, with its oxymoronic name, is a motley collection of workers in the fast-evolving freelance economy — whether lawyers, software developers, graphic artists, accountants, consultants, nannies, writers, editors, Web site designers or sellers on Etsy. ... The Freelancers Union, which is based in Brooklyn, doesn’t bargain with employers, but it does address what is by far these workers’ No. 1 concern, by providing them with affordable health insurance. Its health insurance company covers 23,000 workers in New York State and has $105 million in annual revenue. Impressed by that success, the Obama administration recently awarded Ms. Horowitz’s group $340 million in low-interest loans to establish cooperatives in New York, New Jersey and Oregon that will provide health coverage to freelancers and tens of thousands of other workers.

Having health insurance makes it far easier to be a part of what Ms. Horowitz calls the “gig economy.”
freelancing 
march 2013 by jerryking
On the digital job, in a virtual manner - The Globe and Mail
JESSICA LEEDER

Special to The Globe and Mail

Published Friday, Dec. 28 2012,
freelancing  oDesk  eLance  self-employment 
december 2012 by jerryking
O, brave new TempWorld
September 29, 2000| Fortune |Review by Larry Keller, CNN.com/career Senior Writer
The Good News About Careers: How You'll Be Working in the Next Decade'
By Barbara Moses, Ph.D.(Jossey-Bass/Pfeiffer)

To cope with this uncertainty, Moses asserts that workers must learn to become "career activists."
Know what kind of work engages you and gives your life meaning.

Sell yourself. People in their 20s and early 30s are more comfortable doing this than those who are older, she says. For the latter, she offers advice on marketing oneself in a way that's effective without feeling like a phony.

OLD OR NEW?



See if you're closer to Barbara Moses' old- or new-style worker. More



Network with others. Moses stresses that this means developing mutually supportive relationships with others, not using people or indiscriminately exchanging business cards at every function you attend.

Stay current in your field and continue to develop skills and knowledge outside it.

...It's not just rank-and-file workers who must cope with a rapidly changing workplace. The challenges can be just as daunting for managers. Moses suggests they incorporate 10 strategies aimed at keeping the troops happy and productive.

Among her recommendations: Provide skill-building opportunities, sabbaticals, career planning, mentoring and flexible benefits. She also proposes that managers try to give employees a sense of ownership of the projects on which they work.

September 29, 2000
Managing_Your_Career  Barbara_Moses  books  gig_economy  book_reviews  self-reliance  freelancing  workplaces  generations  solo  contractors  millennials  rapid_change 
december 2012 by jerryking
Independent Workers Are Here to Stay - NYTimes.com
April 14, 2012 | New York Times | By ALEXANDRA LEVIT.
Brand yourself as a contributor that any organization would love to hire. Create strong profiles on sites like LinkedIn and Facebook, and build an eye-catching Web site around your personal domain name. Learn about client recruitment and retention from other sales people and business owners, and incorporate their techniques.

Be prepared to join a group like the Freelancers Union, which advocates for the rights of contingent workers, and to attend meetings so you can network, swap war stories, master best practices and support fellow contractors.
freelancing  solo  self-employment  personal_branding  contracting  contractor  gig_economy 
april 2012 by jerryking
To Boost the Economy, Help the Self-Employed -
June 7, 2011 BusinessWeek By Richard Greenwald
Despite their importance to our economic health, we impede nearly
one-third of our workforce by making so-called freelancers, contractors,
and consultants play by outdated rules.

Despite their increasing importance to the economy, the growth of these
freelancers' businesses is stymied by our tax and labor
codes....Freelancers Shoulder All Risks

Today, the fast-growing freelance workforce is shouldering costs and
risks that were formerly borne by companies. The self-employed can't get
unemployment insurance or file for workman's compensation. They aren't
covered by most federal or state employee labor laws, leaving them
little recourse but to spend precious time and money in small claims
court when they aren't paid.

Worse, the self-employed are taxed as if they're medium-sized employers,
but they can't deduct health-insurance premiums and other expenses that
big companies can deduct.
freelancing  challenges  economy  self-employment  gig_economy  policymaking 
july 2011 by jerryking
The Freelance Economy
11.16.09 | Forbes.com - Magazine Article | Keren Blankfeld,
Steinberg works 30 to 40 hours a week. But along with millions of other
contractors, she may not show up on the radar of the U.S. Bureau of
Labor Statistics, which compiles unemployment statistics by surveying
households and counting pay stubs. No one knows how many freelancers,
part-timers and consultants there are--the Government Accountability
Office took a stab in 2006, guesstimating that the group made up 30% of
all workers--much less how many escape the notice of the BLS. "It's
difficult to track, and is often misclassified or not accounted for by
the Department of Labor," says Sarah Horowitz, director of the
Freelancers Union in Brooklyn, N.Y. One thing is certain: The shape of
the so-called informal economy is changing.
freelancing  economy  statistics  GAO  BLS  informal_economy  Freshbooks  gig_economy 
june 2011 by jerryking
New York Times Magazine: The Self-Employed Depression
Emily Bazelon
Document types: Commentary
Document features: Photographs
Publication title: New York Times Magazine. New York: Jun 7, 2009. pg. 38, 4 pgs
freelancing  depression  Freshbooks 
may 2011 by jerryking
How to implement habits to get more productive
October 24th, 2008 | | by Klaus Wiedemann . Being productive
in the long term is always a challenge in the tough work environment of
the 21th century, no matter whether you are a freelancer or work in a
coporate setting.
Today’s financial crisis does certainly not help to make one’s life
easier, with long-term job security being a thing of the past for most
industries. Therefore, it is sometimes a good idea to take a step back
and rethink the way you work.

Steven Snell has a nice article about how to be productive at
www.FreeLanceSwitch.com. Although gear more towards freelancer, he has
some very valid points to make. Among his most important areas to focus
on are (among others)

* Goals
* Email/Communication
* Tasks
* Time Management
* Organisation
howto  productivity  21st._century  challenges  Managing_Your_Career  management_consulting  GTD  time-management  habits  freelancing 
october 2010 by jerryking
The Gig Economy
January 12, 2009 | The Daily Beast | by Tina Brown. No one I
know has a job anymore. They've got Gigs.

Gigs: a bunch of free-floating projects, consultancies, and part-time
bits and pieces they try and stitch together to make what they refer to
wryly as “the Nut”—the sum that allows them to hang on to the apartment,
the health-care policy, the baby sitter, and the school fees.
freelancing  economy  jobs  trends  future  business  Tina_Brown 
october 2010 by jerryking
Fugu Talk :: The IGDA Health Plan
2009 11 18 | Fugu Talk | Philip Chu. references the freelance ecosystem
freelancing  ecosystems  healthcare  videogames  gig_economy 
october 2010 by jerryking
How to Succeed in the Age of Going Solo - WSJ.com
FEBRUARY 8, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By RICHARD
GREENWALD. Anybody can become a consultant. But not everybody does it
well. Here's what you need to know to thrive. (1) Think Long Term.
think in terms of the long haul, preparing for a marathon, not a
sprint.; (2) Join a Network. successful consultants are in a network or
community of consultants. These networks are important sources of new
clients. ; (3) Have Your Own Space; (4) Think Like an Entrepreneur.
Don't drift from project to project. That's a mistake. Have a business
plan or mission statement.
Be known for the work that you do/ don't do [JCK: saying "no"]. Organizing your business.
Use invoicing software to track billing, don`t mingle personal &
business finances, and keep good records for taxes or expenses. Think of
cash flows, future investments & downtime.
affirmations  cash_flows  downtime  entrepreneurship  freelancing  howto  jck  ksfs  long-haul  long-term  management_consulting  mission_statements  networking  say_"no"  solo 
september 2010 by jerryking
Freelancers Fight to Be Paid - WSJ.com
APRIL 27, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By JOE LIGHT. More Freelancers Fight to Be Paid. Send to Freshbooks
freelancing  invoicing  billing  fees_&_commissions 
may 2010 by jerryking
Temporary Workers and the 21st Century Economy - WSJ.com
NOVEMBER 30, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | by JODY GREENSTONE
MILLER. Today, demand for high-end temporary business talent is not
focused on cost-cutting projects, as some might suspect. Instead, firms
use temporary executives to drive innovation. In uncertain times, firms
are simply more comfortable with deploying talent on a flexible basis.

Temporary work also boosts economic efficiency because not all executive
roles require permanent staff. For example, one pharmaceutical company
client took on a temporary marketing executive to help launch a new
drug. The old way of doing this was to make a new permanent hire (or a
small team) who would have been under-utilized after the launch. The
availability of temporary staff who can get the job done quickly means
that firms can rethink how work is organized.
interim  workforce_planning  executive_management  on-demand  freelancing  21st._century  contingent_workers  gig_economy 
january 2010 by jerryking
Recession Takes a Toll on Freelance Livelihoods - NYTimes.com
June 2, 2009 | New York Times | By EMILY BAZELON. At the
Freelancers Union, Sara Horowitz is pushing for a new kind of
unemployment protection fund that would cover the self-employed by
helping them put away money that they could draw on in times of need.
economic_downturn  freelancing  yoga  entrepreneurship  tradeoffs  self-employment  unemployment  gig_economy 
june 2009 by jerryking
Free Agent Jungle
solo but not alone. community and networking events for free agents, freelancers, consultants
freelancing  networking  business  collaboration  solo 
may 2009 by jerryking
As a Music Contractor, His Job Is the Pits - WSJ.com
Quirky story about John Miller who has built a business as a musical contractor.
musicals  contractor  freelancing  music_industry 
january 2009 by jerryking

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