recentpopularlog in

jerryking : fresh_eyes   15

Always seek out novelty — even at home
April 26, 2019 | Financial Times | by Tim Harford.
* A Mathematical Theory of Communication by Claude Shannon (1948)
* The search for new experiences should not just be for our holidays.
* Japan: 10 days in a far-off land produces a richer treasury of detailed memories than 10 weeks back home. But why?
* Actively searching for new experiences --whether on holiday abroad or within your daily routine at home!!
* Novelty isn't just about mental stimulation. It also exposes you to opportunity.....Variation also reshapes the mental categorisation of experiences, so that freshness can be found within routine activities.
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
While on an adventurous holiday, many people experience that strange sense of time having slowed down in the most pleasurable way, and of conversations that begin, “Was it really only yesterday that we . . . ?”

Ten days in a far-off land produces a richer treasury of detailed memories than 10 weeks back home. But what is behind this phenomenon?

Claude Shannon,in 1948, published one of his two profound contributions, A Mathematical Theory of Communication.....a message can be compressed to the extent that it is predictable. ....(e.g. Ritualised conversations (“How are you?” “Very well, thank you. How are you?”) can be heavily compressed.....A movie can be compressed because, between cuts, each frame tends to resemble the previous one....Although the parallel is not exact, much the same thing seems to be going on with our memories of life. The brain is not a video recorder; we recall the gist. Sometimes the gist is very brief. If I get up in the morning at the usual time, eat my customary breakfast and catch my usual train to the office, why should my brain trouble itself to remember this day two weeks after the fact? The diffs are barely worth bothering with. In contrast, fresh experiences defy compression: the diffs are too big........Brian Christian, author of The Most Human Human, a book about conversations between humans and computers, speculates that if we’re seeking advice we should ask the person of whose answer we are least certain. If we want to understand a person, we should ask them the question to which we are least sure of their answer.
algorithms  books  compression  creativity  creative_renewal  economists  experience_economy  fresh_eyes  habits  holidays  insta-bae  Japan  mybestlife  novelty  non-routine  Slow_Movement  Tim_Harford  travel  unpredictability  vacations  variety 
april 2019 by jerryking
A Burglar’s Guide to the City
Ways of thinking/looking at the built environment. Consider "security architecture".

Studying architecture the way a burglar would, Geoff Manaugh takes readers through walls, down elevator shafts, into panic rooms, and out across the rooftops of an unsuspecting city.

At the core of A Burglar’s Guide to the City is an unexpected and thrilling insight: how any building transforms when seen through the eyes of someone hoping to break into it.

Encompassing nearly 2,000 years of heists and break-ins, the book draws on the expertise of reformed bank robbers, FBI Special Agents, private security consultants, the L.A.P.D. Air Support Division, and architects past and present.

Whether picking locks or climbing the walls of high-rise apartments, finding gaps in a museum’s surveillance routine or discussing home invasions in ancient Rome, A Burglar's Guide to the City ensures readers will never enter a bank again without imagining how to loot the vault or walk down the street without planning the perfect getaway.
Achilles’_heel  architecture  books  counterintuitive  dark_side  fresh_eyes  hacks  heists  mindsets  observations  pay_attention  security  security_consciousness 
april 2016 by jerryking
In the Age of Information, Specializing to Survive - NYTimes.com
By J. PEDER ZANEMARCH 19, 2015

Artists from Picasso to Bob Dylan and entrepreneurs including Bill Gates and Steve Jobs changed the world by finding “radically new ways of looking at old problems,” Mr. Galenson said. “They cut through all the accumulated stuff — forget what’s been done — to see something special, something new.”

It is why, Mr. Galenson added, the historian and physicist Stanley Goldberg said of Einstein, “It was almost as if he were wearing special glasses to make all that was irrelevant invisible."
polymaths  Renaissance  information_overload  fresh_eyes  specialization  sense-making  reconceptualization  Pablo_Picasso  Bob_Dylan  billgates  Steve_Jobs 
march 2015 by jerryking
Meet the SEC’s Brainy New Crime Fighters - WSJ
By SCOTT PATTERSON
Updated Dec. 14, 2014

The SEC is mustering its mathematical firepower in its Center for Risk and Quantitative Analytics, which was created last year soon after Mary Jo White took charge of the agency to help it get better at catching Wall Street misconduct. The enforcement unit, led by 14-year SEC veteran Lori Walsh, is housed deep within the warrens of the SEC’s Washington headquarters, and staffed by about 10 employees trained in fields such as mathematical finance, economics, accounting and computer programming.

Ms. Walsh says access to new sources of data and new ways of processing the data have been key to finding evidence of wrongdoing. “When you look at data in different ways, you see new things,” she said in an interview
alternative_data  analysis  analytics  arms_race  data  data_driven  enforcement  fresh_eyes  hiring  information_sources  mathematics  misconduct  models  modelling  patterns  perspectives  quantitative  quants  SEC  stockmarkets  Wall_Street 
december 2014 by jerryking
Blair’s problem is that it’s 2014, not 2004 - The Globe and Mail
ADAM RADWANSKI
The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Jul. 31 2014,

There is good reason that the heads of most major police forces are lucky to last a decade on the job, as Chief Blair has, let alone beyond it. Over the years, the mandate from civilians will inevitably change, as old challenges are addressed and new ones arise. And for a variety of reasons, the loss of public trust to inevitable controversies and the difficulty of maintaining support among police rank-and-file among them, a chief who comes in driving one agenda is not often willing or able to pivot to a different one....But partly because the city has on the whole become safer, the police board’s criteria for a suitable chief have changed. As governments at all levels tighten their belts, there is a growing push to rein in police costs that have mostly been given a free pass – climbing, in Toronto, to more than $1-billion annually.

As the board has pushed him to find savings, Chief Blair has aggressively resisted. Had he not done so, it is unlikely he would have been able to keep his force behind him for as long as he has. But that just adds to the impetus to bring in someone new.

So, too, does the perception that having in recent years been surrounded by a tight circle of confidantes, Chief Blair is too set in his ways to seriously consider structural changes that could improve efficiencies – merging or even eliminating certain units, for instance, or replacing officers with civilians for office tasks.

The desire for institutional reform helps explain why there is speculation that the board, which may have unusual latitude in choosing his successor given the city’s lack of a functional mayor, will bring in a fresh set of eyes from outside the force. Executive-leadership skills will probably count for more than previously, and having climbed up through the ranks for less.

To his civilian overseers, in other words, Chief Blair looks like yesterday’s man.
Bill_Blair  Toronto  mayoral  cost-cutting  fresh_eyes  institutional_change  civilian_oversight  police  police_force  policing  Toronto_Police_Service  Toronto_Police_Services_Board  structural_change 
july 2014 by jerryking
How I learned to love uncertainty - The Globe and Mail
LEAH EICHLER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jul. 11 2014,

In times of uncertainty do all that’s expected of you, since that’s where you have control, and making a positive contribution to your workplace spurs confidence. At the same time, take the opportunity to create new goals that can guide you out of these dark times and give you a fresh perspective.
uncertainty  Leah_Eichler  Silicon_Valley  fresh_eyes 
july 2014 by jerryking
Look beyond the obvious to understand an artwork
Sir, Gillian Tett (" The lost art of finance ", March 15) rightly argues that a more creative approach to finance would be beneficial and that art can be a useful means of gaining a fresh perspective....
finance  Wall_Street  art  museums  fresh_eyes  letters_to_the_editor  artists  artwork  art_galleries  Gillian_Tett  perspectives  paintings  interpretation  latent  art_appreciation 
may 2014 by jerryking
Operational Expertise Makes the Difference
Fall 2004 | The Journal of Private Equity | Peter L. Tourtellot

In the last decade, companies in need of innovative change-agents learned to look outside their industries for new chief executives. These leaders were just what the companies needed: outsiders with a fresh perspective that
encourage strategic and organizational change. When a company is in distress. it needs to make drastic changes An industry outsider. with a wide range of operational experience is in the best position to get a handle on the root causes of trouble and identify applicable solutions from other industries that may never have occurred to the faltering company. Simply put. the need for industry experience in a turnaround situation is a myth. An industry outsider is the best source for the out-of-the-box thinking needed to reverse a company's decline.
turnarounds  execution  CEOs  private_equity  change_agents  industry_expertise  expertise  operations  outsiders  decline  out-of-the-box  fresh_eyes 
august 2012 by jerryking
In a Downturn, Provoke Your Customers
March 2009 | HBR | by Philip Lay, Todd Hewlin, and Geoffrey Moore

The downturn is making it tougher than ever to make a sale. The companies you serve are slashing budgets. Senior executives—
not the managers you’ve traditionally dealt with—are now the decision makers. But you can motivate those executives to allocate funds for your offering—by using provocation-based selling:
• Identify a critical problem facing your customer—one so ominous that, even in a downturn, it will find the money to address it.
• Formulate a provocative view of the problem—a fresh perspective that frames the problem in a jarring new light.
• Lodge your provocation with an executive who has the power to approve the solution you’re proposing. To win support,convey the magnitude and intractability of the problem—without putting him on the defensive.
boldness  economic_downturn  fresh_eyes  Geoffrey_Moore  HBR  howto  pain_points  perspectives  problems  problem_solving  provocations  selling_the_problem  recessions  sales_cycle  selling  solutions 
august 2012 by jerryking
What You Need to Succeed - Thomas Stemberg - Highland Capital Partners
By Thomas Stemberg | Jan 1, 2007

business plans are interesting chiefly as indications of how an entrepreneur thinks. Here at Highland Capital Partners, the venture capital firm I'm part of now, we spend most of our time talking about what really matters: management and market. If you have the right management team and an exciting market, the rest will take care of itself. I suspected that was true before I came here--it had always been true for me. Now I know it for a fact.

(1) The right people: Folks who have been there and done (something like) that.
(2) The right market: Preferably, it involves an absolute mob scene.
(3) The right answers: Sometimes you need an outside perspective.
Staples  entrepreneur  business_planning  venture_capital  Lululemon  Highland_Capital  fresh_eyes  large_markets  outsiders  the_right_people  what_really_matters 
november 2011 by jerryking
Seeing old problems through fresh eyes
May 11, 2011| Globe and Mail | by HARVEY SCHACHTER
Practically Radical
By William C. Taylor
William Morrow, 293 pages, $31.99

A new book by the co-founder of Fast Company magazine says it's possible to transform an organization by doing two things: 1. Look at the familiar as if you've never seen it before 2. Find inspiration from outside your own field...two premises. The first notion is that what you see shapes how you change. The best leaders, he argues, demonstrate a capacity for "vuja dé."

We all know what déjà vu is: Looking at an unfamiliar situation and feeling as if you have seen it before.

Vuja dé is the opposite: Looking at a familiar situation - be it the industry you have worked in for years, or the products you have been selling for ages - as if you have never seen them before.

Interestingly, often that involves looking to the past to figure out why your organization was successful and figuring out how to refresh it with the insights of the founders....second principle is that where you look shapes what you see. If you run a hospital, what you see will differ if you look at other hospitals for inspiration or to an auto plant.

In this case, vuja dé involves looking outside your organization to discover what you may have been missing.
problem_solving  Harvey_Schachter  book_reviews  outsiders  inspiration  creative_renewal  learning_journeys  fresh_eyes  books 
october 2011 by jerryking
OFFICE SPACE: THE BOSS; The Power of Persistence
November 6, 2005 | New York Times | By JAMES A. GUEST; AS
TOLD TO PATRICIA R. OLSEN. I always just went after the jobs I wanted
and kept at it without being obnoxious. People have taken a chance on me
and trusted me to bring a fresh perspective. In 1973 I wanted to be
banking and insurance commissioner of Vermont although I had no
experience in either field. I called and the governor's aide said they
really wanted a Vermont native. I called again and said I was going to
be in Vermont the next week and asked to stop in. I brought a 10-page
report with me about what I would do if I got the job. They called the
next week and offered me the position.
perseverance  persistence  inspiration  fresh_eyes  interview_preparation  Ted_Kennedy  career_paths  Managing_Your_Career  '70s  Vermont 
february 2010 by jerryking
Trading places
January 2006 | Report on Business Magazine | by DOUG STEINER.
Ottawa needs a jolt of fresh financial thinking. Let's send in some
relief pitchers from Bay Street
Doug_Steiner  Ottawa  public_sector  Bay_Street  open_mind  finance  ideas  creativity  fresh_eyes 
february 2010 by jerryking
How to Ask Better Questions
May 6, 2009 | Management Essentials - HarvardBusiness.org | by Judith Ross.

The most effective and empowering questions create value in one or more of the following ways:

They create clarity: “Can you explain more about this situation?”
They construct better working relations: Instead of “Did you make your sales goal?” ask, “How have sales been going?”
They help people think analytically and critically: “What are the consequences of going this route?”
They inspire people to reflect and see things in fresh, unpredictable ways: “Why did this work?”
They encourage breakthrough thinking: “Can that be done in any other way?”
They challenge assumptions: “What do you think you will lose if you start sharing responsibility for the implementation process?
They create ownership of solutions: “Based on your experience, what do you suggest we do here?”
assumptions  breakthroughs  clarity  critical_thinking  fresh_eyes  Harvard  HBR  howto  indispensable  inspiration  JCK  owners  questions  reflections  relationships  value_creation 
june 2009 by jerryking
Judgment Trumps Experience - WSJ.com
NOVEMBER 29, 2007 | Wall Street Journal | By WARREN BENNIS and NOEL TICHY.

judgment is the core, the nucleus of exemplary leadership. With good judgment, little else matters. Without it, nothing else matters........Leadership is, at its marrow, the chronicle of judgment calls. These will inevitably write the leader's legacy.....not discounting the importance of experience. Seminal and appropriate experiences must be drawn on and understood before judgments can be informed. But experience is no guarantee of good judgment. There is a huge difference between 20 yrs. of experience that advances one's learning and one year of experience repeated 20 times.........there are numerous times when past experiences can prevent wise judgments. Barbara Tuchman long ago observed how generals tend to fight the last war, refusing to face new realities, almost always with disastrous consequences. And often, especially in today's dizzying world, we need to understand what Zen Buddhists call the "beginner's mind," which recognizes the value of fresh insight unfettered by experience. ........Judgment isn't quite an unnatural act, but it also doesn't come naturally. And speaking from decades of experience, we're not sure how to teach it. (We know it can be learned.) Wisely processed experience, reflection, valid sources of timely information, an openness to the unbidden and character are critical components of judgment as well. As David McCullough reminds us over and over again, "Character counts in the presidency more than any other single quality."
Barbara_Tuchman  character_traits  experience  fresh_eyes  Hillary_Clinton  judgment  leaders  leadership  Obama  Noel_Tichy  Warren_Bennis 
january 2009 by jerryking

Copy this bookmark:





to read