recentpopularlog in

jerryking : game_changers   28

Why moonshots elude the timid of heart
February 14, 2020 | Financial Times | by Tim Harford.

* Loonshots — by Safi Bahcall.
* Major innovations tend to result from investment that is high-risk, high-pay-off.
* Executives at the Cambridge, UK outpost of an admired Japanese company fret that success rate of their research and development, at 70%, was far too high. It signals that research teams had been risk-averse, pursuing easy wins at the expense of more radical and risky long-shots.
* Disney, the belief is that Disney if you weren't failing at half of your endeavours, you weren’t being brave or creative enough.
* The problem is a societal/systematic preference for marginal gains over long shots---It is much more pleasant to experience a steady trickle of small successes than a long drought while waiting for a flood that may never come.
* marginal gains do add up, but need to be bolstered by the occasional long-shot breakthrough.....Major innovations such as the electric motor, the photo­voltaic cell or the mobile phone open up new territories that the marginal-gains innovators & tinkerers can further exploit.[JCK: from Simon Johnson, "public investments in research and development contribute to what the authors call the “spillover effect.” When the product of the research is not a private firm’s intellectual property, its impact flows across the economy."]
* the UK Conservative party’s promise to establish “a new agency for high-risk, high-pay-off research, at arm’s length from government” — a British version of the much-admired US Defense Advanced Projects Research Agency.
* DARPA's failure rate is often said to be around 85%.
* a low failure rate may indeed signal a lack of originality and ambition.
* Arpa hires high-quality scientists for short stints — often two or three years — and giving them control over a programme budget to commission research from any source they wish.
* the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, a foundation, deliberately looks for projects with an unusual or untried approach, but a large potential pay-off.....HHMI gets what it pays for — more failures, but larger successes, compared with other grant-makers funding researchers of a similar calibre.
* how long will UK politicians tolerate failure as a sign of boldness and originality? Eventually, they will simply call it failure.
* the trilemma: Be cautious, or fund lots of risky but tiny projects, or fund a few big, risky projects from a modest budget and accept that every single one may flop.
audacity  big_bets  boldness  books  breakthroughs  Cambridge  DARPA  failure  game_changers  high-reward  high-risk  incrementalism  industrial_policies  innovation  jump-start  marginal_improvements  moonshots  originality  politicians  public_investments  publicly_funded  quick_wins  R&D  risk-aversion  science  small_wins  spillover  success_rates  thinking_big  Tim_Harford  timidity  United_Kingdom 
9 days ago by jerryking
Start-up Strategy: To Change the Game, Change the Economics of How It's Played – The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss
MAY 13, 2009 BY TIM FERRISS
Start-up Strategy: To Change the Game, Change the Economics of How It's Played
114 COMMENTS
TOPICS: CATEGORIESMARKETING
business_models  Tim_Ferriss  game_changers 
8 weeks ago by jerryking
Grand follies and the art of thinking big
February 22, 2019 |Financial Times| by Janan Ganesh.

Who would rather that Airbus had never made the bet at all? Who would live in a world that never risks over-reach?

A defender of grand follies is spoilt for examples that turned out well........Today’s vainglorious travesty is tomorrow’s untouchable fixture of the landscape. We are lousy judges of future tastes, including our own....Even if an audacious project fails, and fails lastingly, it can still trigger success stories of other kinds. Some of this happens through the sheer technical example set: the A380, like Concorde before it, forced engineers to innovate in ways that will cascade down the decades in unpredictable ways. Some of the most banal givens of daily life — dust busters, wireless headsets — can be traced back to that messianic project we know as the space programme.

Then there is the inspiring spectacle of just trying to do something big. Progress through tinkering counts no less than progress through great leaps, but only the second kind is likely to electrify people into venturing their own efforts. Without the grand gesture — and the risk of humiliation — any field of endeavour is liable to stagnate.....Perhaps an exhausted west now prefers to tinker all the same. Big ideas are often paid for out of idle wealth (think of Elon Musk’s fortune, or Alphabet’s cash pile) and the existence of this can seem almost distasteful in a culture that is newly sensitive to inequality. As for largeness of vision, there was plenty of the stuff in the forever wars and pre-crash banking. It would be strange if people who lived through those events did not now flinch at the sight of excitable visionaries brandishing schemes.
Airbus  audacity  big_bets  breakthroughs  Elon_Musk  fallacies_follies  game_changers  humiliation  incrementalism  inspiration  Janan_Ganesh  Jeff_Bezos  marginal_improvements  moonshots  overreach  risks  thinking_big  tinkerers  visionaries 
february 2019 by jerryking
The Chip That Changed the World
Aug. 26, 2018 | WSJ | By Andy Kessler.

Integrated circuits are the greatest invention since fire—or maybe indoor plumbing. The world would be unrecognizable without them. They have bent the curve of history, influencing the economy, government and general human flourishing. The productivity unleashed from silicon computing power disrupted or destroyed everything in its path: retail, music, finance, advertising, travel, manufacturing, health care, energy. It’s hard to find anything Kilby’s invention hasn’t changed.

Now what? Despite the routine media funeral for Moore’s Law, it’s not dead yet. But it is old.......Brace yourself. When Moore’s Law finally gives up the ghost, productivity and economic growth will roll over too—unless. The world needs another Great Bend, another Kilbyesque warp in the cosmos, to drive the economy.

One hope is quantum computing, which isn’t limited by binary 1s and 0s, but instead uses qubits (quantum bits) based on Schrödinger’s quantum mechanics. .......Maybe architecture will keep the growth alive. Twenty years ago, Google created giant parallel computer systems to solve the search problem. The same may be seen for artificial intelligence, which is in its infancy. ......Energy is being disrupted but not fast enough. Where is that battery breakthrough? .........Biocomputing is another fascinating area. We already have gene editing in the form of Crispr. New food supplies and drugs may change how humans live and not die and bend the curve. But.... anything involving biology is painfully slow. ....Computing takes nanoseconds; biology takes days, weeks, even years. Breakthroughs may still come, but experiments take so long that progress lags behind. Still, I’d watch this space closely.
Andy_Kessler  artificial_intelligence  breakthroughs  broad-based_scientific_enquiry  Crispr  game_changers  gene_editing  Gordon_Moore  hard_to_find  history  inventions  miniaturization  molecular_biology  Moore's_Law  Nobel_Prizes  quantum_computing  semiconductors 
august 2018 by jerryking
How Financial Products Drive Today’s Art World
July 20, 2018 | The New York Times | By Scott Reyburn.

How does one invest in art without going through the complications of buying and owning an actual artwork?

That is the question behind financial products for investors attracted by soaring art prices but intimidated by the complexity and opacity of the market..... entrepreneurs are trying to iron out the archaic inefficiencies of the art world with new types of financial products, particularly the secure ledgers of blockchain...... “More transparency equals more trust, more trust equals more transactions, more transactions equals stronger markets,” Anne Bracegirdle, a specialist in the photographs department at Christie’s, said on Tuesday at the auction house’s first Art & Tech Summit, dedicated to exploring blockchain......blockchain’s decentralized record-keeping could create a “more welcoming art ecosystem” in which collectors and professionals routinely verify the authenticity, provenance and ownership of artworks on an industrywide registry securely situated in the cloud...... blockchain has already proved to be a game-changer in one important area of growth, according to those at the Christie’s event: art in digital forms.

“Digital art is a computer file that can be reproduced and redistributed infinitely. Where’s the resale value?”.....For other art and technology experts, “tokenization” — using the value of an artwork to underpin tradable digital tokens — is the way forward. “Blockchain represents a huge opportunity for the size of the market,” said Niccolò Filippo Veneri Savoia, founder of Look Lateral, a start-up looking to generate cryptocurrency trading in fractions of artworks.

“I see more transactions,” added Mr. Savoia, who pointed out that tokens representing a percentage of an artwork could be sold several times a year. “The crypto world will bring huge liquidity.”......the challenge for tokenization ventures such as Look Lateral is finding works of art of sufficient quality to hold their value after being exposed to fractional trading. The art market puts a premium on “blue chip” works that have not been overtraded, and these tend to be bought by wealthy individuals, not by fintech start-ups.....UTA Brant Fine Art Fund, devised by the seasoned New York collector Peter Brant and the United Talent Agency in Los Angeles.

The fund aims to invest $250 million in “best-in-class” postwar and contemporary works,...Noah Horowitz, in his 2011 primer, “Art of the Deal: Contemporary Art in a Global Financial Market,”.... funds, tokenization and even digital art are all investments that don’t give investors anything to hang on their walls.

“We should never forget that in the center of it all is artists,”
art  artists  art_advisory  art_authentication  art_finance  auctions  authenticity  best_of  blockchain  blue-chips  books  Christie's  collectors  conferences  contemporary_art  digital_artifacts  end_of_ownership  fin-tech  investing  investors  opacity  post-WWII  provenance  record-keeping  scarcity  tokenization  collectibles  replication  alternative_investments  crypto-currencies  digital_currencies  currencies  virtual_currencies  metacurrencies  art_market  fractional_ownership  primers  game_changers 
july 2018 by jerryking
Disney’s Big Bet on Streaming Relies on Little-Known Tech Company
OCT. 8, 2017 | The New York Times | By BROOKS BARNES and JOHN KOBLIN.

For two days in June 2017, Disney’s board of directors wrestled with one topic: how technology was disrupting the company’s traditional movie, television and theme park businesses, and what to do about it?.....Cord cutting was accelerating much faster than expected. Live viewing for some children’s programming was in free fall......Robert A. Iger, Disney’s chief executive and chairman, proposed a legacy-defining move. It was time for Disney to double down on streaming..... bet the entertainment giant’s future on a wonky, little-known technology company housed in a former cookie factory: BamTech.....Based in Manhattan’s Chelsea Market, the 850-employee company has a strong track record — no serious glitches, even when delivering tens of millions of live streams at a time. BamTech also has impressive advertising technology (inserting ads in video based on viewer location) and a strong reputation for attracting and keeping viewers, not to mention billing them.....BamTech grew out of Major League Baseball Advanced Media, or Bam for short, which was founded in 2000 as a way to help teams create websites. By 2002, Bam was experimenting with streaming video as a way for out-of-town fans to watch games.

Soon, Bam developed technology that attracted outside clients, including the WWE, Fox Sports, PlayStation Vue and Hulu. HBO went to Bam in 2014 after failing to create a reliable stand-alone streaming service on its own. Could Bam get HBO up and running — in just a few months? Bam built HBO Now for roughly $50 million, delivering it just in time for the Season 5 premiere of “Game of Thrones,” which went off flawlessly. “They were nothing short of herculean for us,” said Richard Plepler, HBO’s chief executive.

In 2015, Bam decided to spin off its streaming division, calling it BamTech. With an eye toward its own direct-to-consumer future, particularly with ESPN, Disney paid $1 billion in 2016 for a 33 percent stake and an option to buy a controlling interest in 2020. To run the stand-alone company, M.L.B. and Disney recruited Michael Paull, 46, from Amazon, where he oversaw Prime Video and the introduction of Amazon Channels.....Disney contends that a big part of BamTech’s value has been overlooked. Down the road, as other media companies move toward streaming, BamTech intends to sign them up as clients.....Though BamTech has proved its streaming bona fides, it still lacks the algorithms and the personalization skills that have helped propel Netflix to success. To fill that gap, Mr. Paull recently hired the former chief technology officer of the F.B.I. to be the head of analytics.....The level of engineering required for that enormous volume of content is no small matter. Each bit of streamable content has to be made to fit a dizzying number of requirements. Start with web browsers, ranging from Safari to Chrome or Explorer, all of which have slightly different demands. It also has to fit every iPhone and Android phone. And then there are connected living room devices like Apple TV.
algorithms  BamTech  big_bets  boards_&_directors_&_governance  CEOs  cord-cutting  digital_savvy  digital_strategies  Disney  disruption  entertainment  game_changers  personalization  Quickplay  sports  sportscasting  streaming  theme_parks  direct-to-consumer 
october 2017 by jerryking
Marginal gains matter but gamechangers transform
25 March/26 March 2017 | FT | by Tim Harford.

In the hunt for productivity, the revolutionary long shot is worth the cost and risk.

.............................As Olympic athletes have shown, marginal improvements accumulated over time can deliver world-beating performance,” said Andrew Haldane in a speech on Monday, which is quite true. Mr Haldane, the Bank of England’s chief economist
........The marginal gains philosophy tries to turn innovation into a predictable process: tweak your activities, gather data, embrace what works and repeat.......As Mr Haldane says, marginal improvements can add up.

But can they add up to productivity gains for the economy as a whole? The question matters. There is no economic topic more important than productivity, which in the long run determines whether living standards surge or stagnate.
........
The idea that developed economies can A/B test their way back to brisk productivity growth is a seductive one.

An alternative view is that what’s really lacking is a different kind of innovation: the long shot. Unlike marginal gains, long shots usually fail, but can pay off spectacularly enough to overlook 100 failures.
.....
These two types of innovation complement each other. Long shot innovations open up new territories; marginal improvements colonise them. The 1870s saw revolutionary breakthroughs in electricity generation and distribution but the dynamo didn’t make much impact on productivity until the 1920s. To take advantage of electric motors, manufacturers needed to rework production lines, redesign factories and retrain workers. Without these marginal improvements the technological breakthrough was of little use.
....Yet two questions remain. One is why so many businesses lag far behind the frontier. .......The culprit may be a lack of competition: vigorous competition tends to raise management quality by spurring improvements and by punishing incompetents with bankruptcy. ....
But the second question is why productivity growth has been so disappointing. A/B testing has never been easier or more fashionable, after all. The obvious answer is that the long shots matter, too.
.....In a data-driven world, it’s easy to fall back on a strategy of looking for marginal gains alone, avoiding the risky, unquantifiable research (jk: leaps of faith). Over time, the marginal gains will surely materialise. I’m not so sure that the long shots will take care of themselves.
adaptability  breakthroughs  compounded  economics  game_changers  incrementalism  innovation  leaps_of_faith  marginal_improvements  moonshots  nudge  organizational_change  organizational_improvements  organizational_structure  power_generation  production_lines  productivity  productivity_payoffs  slight_edge  taxonomy  thinking_big  Tim_Harford 
march 2017 by jerryking
Nurse Next Door puts new spin on getting old
Jul. 12 2012 | The Globe and Mail | by Susan Krashinsky.

The boomer generation represents a game change for the home care industry: They are emerging from a labour market where tech skills are essential. That means clients are about to get a lot more vocal, and they will make themselves heard - not just if the care is subpar, but also if they feel bored or underserved. Nurse Next Door's marketing campaign relies heavily on social media and word of mouth. In order to compete, home care nurses will have to nurture a social-media presence, and go above and beyond to become part of a service industry, not just a care industry [JCK: hints at the need for improved standards for those working within the home care industry].

"Our clients will be using Twitter," DeHart says. "We'd better be really good at what we do."
aging  baby_boomers  caregiving  franchising  game_changers  home_based  home_care  nursing  population_trends  skills  social_media  Susan_Krashinsky  underserved 
april 2013 by jerryking
H.P.’s Misstep Shows Risk in the Push for Big Ideas - NYTimes.com
November 21, 2012 | NYT | By QUENTIN HARDY.

The ill-fated marriage of the companies is a lesson for H.P. and other older technology giants as they throw billions at supposedly game-changing acquisitions, trying to gain a foothold in the future.

In that future, smartphones and tablets, connected to cloud-computing data centers, are the essential tools of work and play. Companies rent software over the air, rather than buying it with expensive maintenance contracts.

And vast streams of data are continually analyzed to find new patterns and make predictions about consumer behavior and product design. Autonomy, for instance, makes software that can analyze marketing patterns and advise a company on matters like where it should increase marketing resources.

These forces threaten older businesses, like H.P.’s traditional personal computer and data storage products. Other companies, like Oracle, Microsoft and Cisco, also face pressure. They are all trying to buy the future — and have the cash to do it..... But identifying the next big thing can be difficult, said Jeffrey Sonnenfeld, a professor of management at Yale University. Likely as not, he said, deals like the one for Autonomy have “maybe a 40 percent success, 60 percent failure rate.”

He added, “The odds are against you succeeding, but the odds are also worth taking.”

The real hazard, he said, is in the way companies describe these acquisitions as “natural, inevitable victories.” They should be seen, he said, as “an investment, like in research and development.”
Autonomy  big_bets  breakthroughs  cloud_computing  cultural_clash  failure  game_changers  HP  ideas  M&A  Meg_Whitman  mergers_&_acquisitions  mistakes  missteps  moonshots  Quentin_Hardy  risks  SaaS  subscriptions  success_rates 
november 2012 by jerryking
Seth's Blog: Changing the game
Posted by Seth Godin on November 01, 2007

Google announced an open interchange that allows users to take their social graph with them from one site to another. MySpace just joined in. This changes the rules for FaceBook, because now users have a choice of picking from dozens, soon to be hundreds of open sites... or just one closed one.

How can you change your game?

Consider the plight of Mike Huckabee and John Edwards. Both are making strong runs for the nominations of their parties, but both suffer because they're not seen as front runners. So why not change the game? Instead of waiting for a TV network to invite them to a debate, why not make your own TV show? Debate each other, in public, in Iowa. Broadcast the whole thing on YouTube. When you're done, challenge others in the opposite party to debate you, one on one. On your channel. What are they, chicken?

Consider the sandwich/burger shop/deli on a street crowded with choices. What to do? Why not get rid of all the meat and become a vegetarian/kosher sandwich/burger shop/deli? Now, it's five competitors and you. Anyone with a friend who eats carefully will bring her to your shop, the one and only one of its kind.

Usually, when you destroy the barriers in an existing industry, everyone loses... except you.
game_changers  entrepreneurship  risk-taking  barriers_to_entry  Seth_Godin  change_agents  thinking_big  scaling  constraints  vegetarian 
september 2012 by jerryking
What the Silence Said - WSJ.com
December 12, 2003 | WSJ | By DANIEL HENNINGER. A tribute to Bob Bartley.

In a December 2000 column about the Bush cabinet (titled, "Think Big"), Bob said this about the attorney-general slot: "The Occam's Razor answer is Jim Baker, just displaying legal generalship in Florida."

If you understand Occam's Razor, you understand the entire Bartley persona. I think Bob put this phrase in print about five times in his career, never of course bothering to explain its origins with the 14th-century English philosopher William of Occam, who posited the principle that the best and sturdiest solution to a problem is often the least complicated. Bob believed mightily in this idea. He thrilled, for instance, at James Carville's summation of the 1992 election: "It's the economy, stupid." Pure Occam's Razor.

Thus: To incentivize an economy you can either rejigger the entire tax code -- or reduce marginal tax rates. To keep prices stable, you can either swim through swamps of economic indicators -- or use a price rule, such as the gold standard. To find out what a nation wants, "hold an election." I think Bob saw Ronald Reagan, more than anything, as an Occam's Razor President ("Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall"). The day Bob heard that Jimmy Carter was scheduling the White House tennis court, he knew it was hopeless.

At the Journal editorial page, if you watched Bob Bartley work through the day's events -- in the news, in ideas, in life -- you learned to focus on the core of an issue, the fulcrum. The taciturnity wasn't an eccentric quirk; it was Bob's adamant, lifelong refusal to allow an issue or idea to be defeated by secondary or irrelevant detail. He defeated the irrelevancies by refusing to legitimize them with talk. Bob Bartley was in the game to move events, to move history. He knew how to do that, and in the 36 years he ran this page's editorials, he taught the rest of us how to do it: Think big. We did, and we will.
Daniel_Henninger  taciturn  tributes  wsj  Occam's_Razor  game_changers  James_A._Baker_III  thinking_big  problem_solving  incisiveness  high-impact  tax_codes 
august 2012 by jerryking
Seth's Blog: On making a ruckus in your industry
Seth Godin on April 07, 2012

* Bring forward a new idea or technology that disrupts and demands a response
* Change pricing dramatically
* Redefine a service as a product (or vice versa)
* Organize the disorganized, connect the disconnected
* Alter the speed to market radically
* Change the infrastructure, the rules or the flow of information
* Give away what used to be expensive and charge for something else
* Cater to the weird, bypassing the masses
* Take the lead on ethics

(Or you could just wait for someone to tell you what they want you to do)
Seth_Godin  blogs  disruption  pricing  information_flows  free  ethics  niches  change_agents  disorganization  ideas  new_businesses  idea_generation  disconnecting  Tabla  game_changers  Play_Bigger 
may 2012 by jerryking
The 6 Habits of True Strategic Thinkers
Mar 20, 2012 | | Inc.com | Paul J. H. Schoemaker.
Adaptive strategic leaders--the kind who thrive in today’s uncertain environment--do six things well:

1. Anticipate. Hone your “peripheral vision.” Reduce vulnerabilities to rivals who detect and act on ambiguous signals. ... Build wide external networks to help you scan the horizon better
2. Think Critically. Critical thinkers question everything. To master this skill, you must force yourself to reframe problems to get to the bottom of things, in terms of root causes. Challenge current beliefs and mindsets, including your own Uncover hypocrisy, manipulation, and bias in organizational decisions.
3. Interpret. Ambiguity is unsettling. Faced with it, you are tempted to reach for a fast (potentially wrongheaded) solution. A good strategic leader holds steady, synthesizing information from many sources before developing a viewpoint. To get good at this, you have to:Seek patterns in multiple sources of data; Question prevailing assumptions and test multiple hypotheses simultaneously.
4. Decide. Many leaders fall prey to “analysis paralysis.” Develop processes and enforce them, so that you arrive at a “good enough” position. To do that well, you have to: Carefully frame the decision to get to the crux of the matter, Balance speed, rigor, quality, and agility. Leave perfection to higher powers. Take a stand even with incomplete information and amid diverse views
5. Align. Consensus is rare. Foster open dialogue, build trust, and engage key stakeholders, especially when views diverge. To pull that off, you need to: Understand what drives other people's agendas, including what remains hidden. Bring tough issues to the surface, even when it's uncomfortable
Assess risk tolerance and follow through to build the necessary support
6. Learn.

As your company grows, honest feedback is harder and harder to come by. You have to do what you can to keep it coming.
Encourage and exemplify honest, rigorous debriefs to extract lessons
Shift course quickly if you realize you're off track
Celebrate both successes and (well-intentioned) failures that provide insight
Do you have what it takes?
tips  leadership  habits  strategic_thinking  anticipating  critical_thinking  networks  biases  conventional_wisdom  decision_making  empathy  feedback  thinking  failure  lessons_learned  leaders  interpretation  ambiguities  root_cause  insights  paralyze  peripheral_vision  analysis_paralysis  reframing  course_correction  vulnerabilities  good_enough  debriefs  post-mortems  problem_framing  discomforts  wide-framing  outward_looking  assumptions  game_changers 
march 2012 by jerryking
Category Creation: Building Businesses That Turn Entire Industries On Their Heads | Fast Company
Krishna 'Kittu' KolluriThu Jan 19, 2012

Fundamental, revolutionary innovation--creating an entirely new category of product or service that didn’t exist before, or disrupting a category in a way that completely changes the game moving forward.

Play the Name Game - you have an adjacent category that is well established, the differentiators for your category must be clear. The importance of positioning cannot be overemphasized. How you communicate what sets your business apart must be an integral part of your market strategy, and naming your category--especially in the enterprise space--is a key part of that strategy.

Turn On the Customer Channel - Turn your best customers into spokespeople for the product by making them delighted evangelists for your vision--whether it’s a service, a product, or a transformation within a sector.
Play Well With Others - how do you carve out a niche--inspire, delight and build a loyal following--without inciting the predatory characteristics of adjacent players?

One approach is to create a go-to-market ecosystem that involves key technology partnerships. In most cases, your product will be part of the solution, but not all of the solution. Determine what it will take to build it out, and recruit other vendors who can participate. Form alliances so you can interoperate with those vendors and those products. Create partnerships to leverage sales channels, like OEMs or value-added resellers.

Be Your Brother’s Keeper (Sometimes)- toss around a competitor’s name in conversation. Sometimes it is more important to: (a) promote and evangelize your category than your company; and (b) give a nod to the competition. Why? Because the sandbox is more interesting if more than one person is playing in it.
adjacencies  change_agents  competitive_landscape  delighting_customers  disruption  ecosystems  evangelists  Flybits  game_changers  innovation  market_position  new_categories  new_businesses  Play_Bigger 
january 2012 by jerryking
8 Things You Can Do To Evolve Your Career - Business Insider
Shira Levine|December 03, 2011|
There's no such thing as a second career.

We only have evolving careers, says marketing expert James Marshall Reilly. Reilly wrote Shake the World: It's Not About Finding a Job, It's About Creating a Life. The book tackles the job market, social entrepreneurship and philanthro-capitalism, and will be released in late December....Reilly's book talks to the "young game-changers" of this generation and seeks to discover how they found success. By game-changers, he means entrepreneurs, both business and social. There are no Young Turk investment bankers, politicians or cancer doctors in his book. These are people who design iPod covers, magazine publishers, serial technology entrepreneurs and the founders of innovative non-profits. There is not a Rotary Club membership between them.
book_reviews  books  start_ups  career_paths  career  Managing_Your_Career  reinvention  new_graduates  millennials  entrepreneurship  game_changers 
december 2011 by jerryking
U of T contributes to New York's push for academic excellence
john lorinc
From Friday's Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Oct. 27, 2011

The University of Toronto has joined a team of international schools to make a bid to build a $450-million urban sciences campus in Brooklyn, N.Y.

The deal includes a promise of city-owned land and $100-million in seed capital. It is part of an ambitious plan by New York’s Mayor Michael Bloomberg to develop a world-class engineering and research commercialization facility. ...Mr. Bloomberg, with his trademark alacrity, wants shovels in the ground by 2013, when he leaves office. “The sense of urgency comes directly form the mayor,” said Seth Pinsky, president of New York’s economic development agency. “We have a limited window of opportunity.”

The radical economic development scheme, considered by many to be the mayor’s legacy project, is expected to generate $6-billion in spin-off investment and create 30,000 creative-class jobs in coming decades.

Mr. Pinsky describes the strategy as “an Erie Canal moment,” a reference to a controversial 1820s decision by a state governor to build an upstate shipping channel. The investment that drove vast wealth into the port of New York....“It may be the single most transformative investment of the Bloomberg administration,” said Richard Florida, director of the Martin Prosperity Initiative at the University of Toronto. “I only wish more cities would think that way.”

With large Canadian universities stuffed to capacity and some provinces considering new campuses, New York’s experiment is a game-changing wealth-generating strategy and ups the ante for big cities like Toronto and Vancouver, said Dr. Florida. “If you see a place like New York moving in this direction, you’ve just seen your biggest competitor take a big step ahead.”
uToronto  Colleges_&_Universities  New_York_City  Michael_Bloomberg  John_Lorinc  urgency  transformational  Erie_Canal  windows_of_opportunity  Richard_Florida  upstate  game_changers  economic_development  wealth_creation  cities  creative_class  the_single_most_important  Martin_Prosperity_Institute 
october 2011 by jerryking
5 Ways Obama Could Lose in 2012 - Marc Ambinder - Politics - The Atlantic
May 26 2011 | The Atlantic | Marc Ambiner. Political advantages
are relative. No one, least of which his own staff, expects Obama to
win by 10 million votes again. He has proved too polarizing--or
incapable of extracting himself from the trap of polarization that
afflicts all modern presidents. That means we're in for, at most, an
election where the losing candidate grosses more than 60 million votes.
We think of game-changers as major events: one-time, snap-like,
existential interjections that swing millions. But game-changers are
better described as concentrated periods of political evolution with
demographic slices of the electorate. Or they can be
filters--constraints--that screen potential ballot casters with certain
allegiances from the voting pool. Most can't be predicted.

But here are some potential slow-motion game-changers that worry the
White House now:

1. Asia Erupts
2. Personal Income Slumps
3. Revenge of the Premiums
4. Turnout Doesn't Turn Out
5. He's a Disaster
elections  electorate  game_changers  Marc_Ambinder  obama  slowly_moving  unpredictability 
may 2011 by jerryking
Three Global Game-Changers for the Information Industry
Dec. 2010 | EContent | Ben Sargent. Here are 3 game-changing
opportunities & challenges that product planners & mktg.managers
must engage:
1. Your future entails a hundred languages, give or take. Each year,
more of the world’s popn. goes online & become info. consumers—but
in an increasingly diverse set of languages. In this year’s update, we
detail 57 economically significant languages needed to reach consumers
& businesses in 101 countries. To successfully
move to this level of multilingual publishing, companies must develop a
process for adding groups of new languages, not one language at a
time—for instance, flipping in one product cycle from 30 languages to
60.
2. The web is a visual medium. Product & mktg. managers must
demand video as an integral part of every product or service, from
conception of the product itself all the way to promotion, sales,
support, & community.
3. Falling translation costs will disrupt the information industry.
ProQuest  languages  multilingual  translations  content  ECM  video  web_video  visualization  product_cycles  localization  game_changers  visual_culture  think_threes 
february 2011 by jerryking
Spill could be ‘game changer’ for oil
Jun. 11, 2010 | The Globe and Mail | Nathan VanderKlippe. The
Deepwater Horizon spill could become a global oil “game changer” by
spurring a deep and potentially costly rethink of the rules needed to
keep offshore drilling safe.
oil_spills  oil_industry  competitive_landscape  game_changers  environmental_disasters  Deepwater_Horizon 
june 2010 by jerryking
Open Canada to the world’s new ways
June 9, 2010 | The Globe and Mail | by Edward Greenspon. "As
Canada moves down the ranks, from the world’s seventh-largest economy to
10th and lower, it must navigate the rise of Asia, the relative decline
of the U.S. and the sudden creation of a new multilateralism, among
other game-changers. How do we play this once-in-a-century period of
global disruption?
The Canadian International Council asked a panel of Canadians, a
post-Cold War digital generation largely in its 30s and 40s, to come up
with a new blueprint. Our report, Open Canada: A Global Positioning
Strategy for a Networked Age, offers bold and original policies and
strategies within the realm of the possible. " We call our report Open
Canada because we think we can prosper by being the most open country in
the world: open to ideas and investment; open to newcomers and new
ways; open to partnerships and networks at home and abroad; open to
competition and the uncompromising pursuit of excellence.
borderless  policy  Canada  Canadian  foreign_policy  Edward_Greenspon  openness  decline  America_in_Decline?  one-time_events  blueprints  game_changers  multilateralism 
june 2010 by jerryking
C.K.'s Lessons For Executives
(1) Think Big (2) Cater to the Poor (3) Don't Get Blindsided (4) Reconsider Outsourcing
tips  executive_management  CEOs  C.K._Prahalad  overdeliver  chutzpah  game_changers  Bottom_of_the_Pyramid  thinking_big  blindsided  blind_spots 
december 2009 by jerryking
Dear Graduate...
JUNE 19, 2006 | Business Week | By Jack and Suzy Welch. (1) As
an ambitious 22-year-old readying to enter the corporate world, how can I
quickly distinguish myself as a winner? -- Dain Zaitz, Corvallis, Ore.

One gets ahead by over-delivering. Start thinking big. Go beyond being the grunt assigned. Do the extra legwork and data-crunching to give [clients] something that really expands their thinking—an analysis, for instance, of how an entire industry might play out over the next three years. What new companies and products might emerge? What technologies could change the game? Could someone, perhaps the client's own company, move production to China?

(2) Revenue growth is at the top of my to-do list. What should I look
for in hiring great sales professionals? -- John Cioffi, Westfield, N.J.
questions  hiring  recruiting  Managing_Your_Career  advice  Jack_Welch  strategic_thinking  anticipating  new_graduates  chutzpah  movingonup  overdeliver  Pablo_Picasso  individual_initiative  generating_strategic_options  independent_viewpoints  thinking_big  game_changers 
november 2009 by jerryking
Thinking bigger
Posted by Seth Godin on September 19, 2008

The bigger point is that none of us are doing enough to challenge the assignment. Every day, I spend at least an hour of my time looking at my work and what I've chosen to do next and wonder, "is this big enough?.... What are you doing to go beyond the expectations...Thinking bigger isn't about being bigger. It's about changing the game. Do what you've always done and you'll get what you've always gotten....Yesterday, I was sitting with a friend who runs a small training company. He asked, "I need better promotion. How do I get more people to take the professional type design course I offer at my office?" My answer was a question, as it usually is. "Why is the course at your office?" and then, "Why is it a course and not accreditation, or why not turn it into a guild for job seekers, where you could train people and use part of the tuition to hire someone to organize a private job board? You could guarantee clients well-trained students (no bozos) and you could guarantee students better jobs... everyone wins."

I have no idea if my idea for the training company is a good one, but I know it's a bigger one.
Seth_Godin  inspiration  overdeliver  chutzpah  individual_initiative  expectations  upselling  thinking_big  scaling  ideas  creating_valuable_content  overambitious  new_categories  game_changers  Play_Bigger 
july 2009 by jerryking

Copy this bookmark:





to read