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jerryking : gender_gap   67

Where Women Fall Behind at Work: The First Step Into Management - WSJ
Oct. 15, 2019 | WSJ | By Vanessa Fuhrmans.

Long before bumping into any glass ceiling, many women run into obstacles trying to grasp the very first rung of the management ladder—and not because they are pausing their careers to raise children—a new, five-year landmark study shows. As a result, it’s early in many women’s careers, not later, when they fall dramatically behind men in promotions, blowing open a gender gap that then widens every step up the chain...... fix that broken bottom rung of the corporate ladder, and companies could reach near-parity all the way up to their top leadership roles within a generation.....“Bias still gets in the way—bias of who you know, who’s like you, or who performs and operates the same way you perform and operate, whose style is more similar.....Employers’ moves to diversify their most senior echelons could provide a road map.....“We’ve seen that if companies really put their minds to it, they can bring about change that matters,” Ms. Thomas says. “If they can apply the same extra elbow grease that they do at the top to the broken rung.........The numbers show that the first step is the steepest for women. But why is that? What’s holding women back from climbing that first rung into management?

It isn’t for lack of ambition..... while many employers have increased their efforts to groom and elevate more senior women—a smaller, select group—fewer have applied the same rigor to cultivating more junior female managers....The upshot: At nearly every career stage, the disparities between men and women have narrowed only marginally since the Women in the Workplace research began in 2015. Even in industries with largely female entry-level workforces, such as retail and health care, men come to dominate the management ranks—a phenomenon that Haig Nalbantian, a labor economist and co-leader of consulting firm Mercer LLC’s Workforce Sciences Institute, calls “the flip.......even in many “female-friendly” sectors, entry-level women still tend to get hired into jobs with limited upward mobility, such as bank tellers or customer-service staff. ..“When companies ask, ‘What’s the one thing we can do systemically?’ we say, ‘It’s not quotas, it’s not targets,’” says Mr. Nalbantian. “It’s about how do you position women and minorities to succeed in the roles that are likely to lead to higher-level positions.”......The takeaway for some women is that they have to assemble their own career ladder.....To secure a sponsor, “you’ve got to consistently perform, have a strong brand and deliver. That’s just table stakes,” she says. “But a lot of people do that and might still not move, because they don’t have the right support.”
barriers_to_entry  biases  coaching  diversity  entry-level  female-friendly  glass_ceilings  gender_gap  management  movingonup  obstacles  sponsorships  takeaways  talent_pipelines  up-and-comers  women  workforce  workplaces 
4 weeks ago by jerryking
The biggest gender divide is in mathematics
September 5, 2019 | | Financial Times| by Carola Hoyos.

Numeracy is vital for everyone. But according to Alain Dehaze, chief executive of Adecco, the world’s biggest recruiting company, the most valuable mathematical skills in a more automated future, especially for those people who can also communicate them to generalists, are the ability to spot patterns; to problem solve logically; and to work with statistics, probability and large data sets to see into the future.
biases  culture  gender_gap  girls  high_schools  mathematics  numeracy  parenting  women 
10 weeks ago by jerryking
The robot-proof skills that give women an edge in the age of AI
February 11, 2019 | Financial Times |by Sarah O’Connor.

in a world of algorithms and artificial intelligence, communication skills and emotional intelligence — traditionally seen as female strengths — could prove key.

The latest panic about artificial intelligence is that it will deal a blow to women in the workplace..... The concerns are legitimate enough, but they fail to appreciate the big ways in which the world of work is going to change. In fact, it is quite possible the age of AI will belong to women. Men are the ones in danger of being left behind....Some AI tools may be biased against women — a risk for any group that has been historically under-represented in the workplace. Because machine learning tends to learn from historical data, it can perpetuate patterns from the past into the future......It is right to pay attention to these problems and work on solutions. Algorithms shouldn’t be given power without transparency, accountability, and human checks and balances. Top AI jobs should be held by a more diverse set of smart people.....As machines become better at many cognitive tasks, it is likely that the skills they are relatively bad at will become more valuable. This list includes creative problem-solving, empathy, negotiation and persuasion. As Andy Haldane, chief economist at the Bank of England, has put it, “the high-skill, high-pay jobs of the future may involve skills better measured by EQs (a measure of emotional intelligence) than IQs”..... increasing demand in these jobs for supplementary skills such as emotional intelligence, which has given women an edge.....as the AI era dawns, it is the right moment to overhaul the way we value these skills, and the way we teach them. With an eye on the demands of the future, we are trying to persuade girls that coding is not just for boys. So why aren’t we also trying to persuade boys that empathy is not just for girls?

We could start by changing the language we use. For too long we have talked about “soft skills”, with connotations of femininity and a lack of rigour. Let’s call them what they are: “robot-proof skills” that neither men nor women can afford to face the 21st century
21st._century  algorithms  artificial_intelligence  biases  checks_and_balances  dark_side  emotional_intelligence  EQ  future-proofing  gender_gap  machine_learning  soft_skills  smart_people  under-representation  women  workplaces  pay_attention  historical_data 
february 2019 by jerryking
Venture capital firms have a gender problem. Here’s how to fix it - The Globe and Mail
JULY 24, 2018 | THE GLOBE AND MAIL | MICHELLE MCBANE AND LAUREN ROBINSON

Investing in women entrepreneurs isn’t just the right thing to do, it’s also the smart thing to do. Companies with a female founder have been shown to outperform all-male competitors. Despite this, when StandUp Ventures was founded last year to back female-led tech startups, many in the industry were skeptical that there even was a pipeline of women-led firms worthy of funding. Turns out there are plenty – StandUp has already made five investments. If more funds step up to the plate and back female entrepreneurs now, we won’t be having this conversation about female VCs again in a decade.

Change isn’t going to happen overnight. VC firms are very different creatures from the startups they fund: They’re conservative and built for stability, not agility.
gender_gap  venture_capital  vc  women  angels  start_ups  large_companies  under-representation  entrepreneur  founders 
july 2018 by jerryking
Silicon Valley and the limits of ‘leaning in’
SEPTEMBER 20, 2017 Emma Jacobs

Working at Kleiner removed the scales from her eyes. “You can’t always get ahead by working hard if you’re not part of the ‘in’ crowd.” The culture, she writes, is “designed to keep out people who aren’t white men . . . for all the public hand-wringing about how unacceptable this is, no one on the inside can honestly say the absence of diversity is a mystery or a coincidence; this is the way they set up the industry”. Despite Asians being well represented in Silicon Valley, she writes, the “bamboo ceiling” means they don’t make it to the upper echelons.

She was frequently told to be bolder. Now she wonders whether the reserve of “introverted, analytical people, often women” was undervalued. “What if our inclination to assess and avoid the outsized risk of certain ventures could be an asset to our teams? Why does it never seem to occur to anyone that it’s an option . . . for the men to actually listen to us?”

Inspired by the arguments of Sheryl Sandberg in her book Lean In that women should take their place at the table, Pao recalls taking the advice literally and installing herself in one of the “power seats” in a private jet, only to find the conversation turn to pornography and sex workers. Once off the plane, the men ditched Pao to socialise together.
Ellen_Pao  Silicon_Valley  book_reviews  books  women  diversity  Kleiner_Perkins  gender_gap  gender_discrimination  Asian-Americans  upper_echelons  white_men 
november 2017 by jerryking
How to Be a C.E.O., From a Decade’s Worth of Them
T OCT. 27, 2017 | The New York Times | Corner Office By ADAM BRYAN.

It started with a simple idea: What if I sat down with chief executives, and never asked them about their companies?.....not about pivoting, scaling or moving to the cloud, but how they lead their employees, how they hire, and the life advice they give or wish they had received....C.E.O.s offer a rare vantage point for spotting patterns about management, leadership and human behavior....What's the best path to becoming a chief executive? No one path... too many variables, many of them beyond your control, including luck, timing and personal chemistry. Bryan cites three recurring themes.

First, they share a habit of mind that is best described as “applied curiosity.”...They make the most of whatever path they’re on, wringing lessons from all their experiences.
Second, C.E.O.s seem to love a challenge. Discomfort is their comfort zone.
The third theme is how they managed their own careers on their way to the top. They focus on doing their current job well, and that earns them promotions... focus on building a track record of success, and people will keep betting on you.
The Most Important Thing About Leadership, Part I - understand that leadership as a series of paradoxes.
The Most Important Thing About Leadership, Part II - the most important qualities of effective leadership? trustworthiness, “If you want to lead others, you’ve got to have their trust, and you can’t have their trust without integrity,” A close cousin of trustworthiness is how much you respect the people who work for you....“By definition if there’s leadership, it means there are followers, and you’re only as good as the followers,” he said. “I believe the quality of the followers is in direct correlation to the respect you hold them in. It’s not how much they respect you that is most important. It’s actually how much you respect them. It’s everything.”
‘Culture Is Almost Like a Religion’ - “No matter what people say about culture, it’s all tied to who gets promoted, who gets raises and who gets fired,” he said. “You can have your stated culture, but the real culture is defined by compensation, promotions and terminations. Basically, people seeing who succeeds and fails in the company defines culture. The people who succeed become role models for what’s valued in the organization, and that defines culture.”
Men vs. Women (Sigh) - distinctions in leadership style are less about gender and more about factors like whether they are introverts or extroverts, more analytical or creative, and even whether they grew up in a large or small family....the actual work of leadership? It’s the same, regardless of whether a man or a woman is in charge. You have to set a vision, build cultural guardrails, foster a sense of teamwork, and make tough calls. All of that requires balancing the endless paradoxes of leadership, and doing it in a way that inspires trust.
I Have Just One Question for You - If you could ask somebody only one question, and you had to decide on the spot whether to hire them based on their answer, what would it be?.....“So if I ask you, ‘What are the qualities you like least and most in your parents?’ you might bristle at that, or you might be very curious about it, or you’ll just literally open up to me. And obviously if you bristle at that, it’s too vulnerable an environment for you.”
My Favorite Story -..... It’s work ethic,” he said. “You could see the guy had charted a path for himself to make it work with the situation he had. He didn’t ask for any help. He wasn’t victimized by the thing. He just said, ‘That’s my dad’s business, and I work there.’ Confident. Proud.”

Mr. Green added: “You sacrifice and you’re a victim, or you sacrifice because it’s the right thing to do and you have pride in it. Huge difference. Simple thing. Huge difference.”

Best Career and Life Advice - biggest career inflection points, he told me, came from chance meetings, giving rise to his advice: “Play in traffic.”

“It means that if you go push yourself out there and you see people and do things and participate and get involved, something happens,” he said. “Both of my great occasions in life happened by accident simply because I showed up.”“I tell people, just show up, get in the game, go play in traffic,” Mr. Plumeri said. “Something good will come of it, but you’ve got to show up.”....from Ruth Simmons, president of Prairie View A&M University. Her suggestion to students:

“They should never assume that they can predict what experiences will teach them the most about what they value, or about what their life should be,” she said. “You have to be open and alert at every turn to the possibility that you’re about to learn the most important lesson of your life.”
howto  human_behavior  CEOs  career_paths  Managing_Your_Career  curiosity  discomforts  values  hard_work  trustworthiness  paradoxes  pairs  organizational_culture  gender_gap  work_ethic  playing_in_traffic  compensation  rewards  beyond_one's_control  guardrails  inflection_points 
october 2017 by jerryking
Unintended Consequences of Sexual Harassment Scandals
OCT. 9, 2017 | The New York Times | Claire Cain Miller @clairecm.

In Silicon Valley, some male investors have declined one-on-one meetings with women, or rescheduled them from restaurants to conference rooms. On Wall Street, certain senior men have tried to avoid closed-door meetings with junior women. And in TV news, some male executives have scrupulously minded their words in conversations with female talent.

An unintended consequence of a season of sex scandals, men describe a heightened caution because of recent sexual harassment cases, and they worry that one accusation, or misunderstood comment, could end their careers. But their actions affect women’s careers, too — potentially depriving them of the kind of relationships that lead to promotions or investments. This is because building genuine relationships with senior people is perhaps the most important contributor to career advancement. In some offices it’s known as having a rabbi; researchers call it sponsorship. Unlike mentors, who give advice and are often formally assigned, sponsors know and respect people enough that they are willing to find opportunities for them, and advocate and fight for them.....sponsors “have to spend some capital and take a risk on the up-and-coming person, and you simply don’t do that unless you know them and trust them.” But these relationships are crucial, she said, for “getting from the middle to the top.”
sponsorships  Claire_Cain_Miller  entertainment_industry  women  venture_capital  Silicon_Valley  Fox_News  mentoring  sexual_harassment  reputational_risk  workplaces  unintended_consequences  political_capital  gender_gap  personal_risk  relationships  deprivations 
october 2017 by jerryking
The Universal Phenomenon of Men Interrupting Women - The New York Times
By SUSAN CHIRAJUNE 14, 2017
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gender_gap  sexism 
june 2017 by jerryking
What women can learn from men - The Globe and Mail
MARGARET WENTE
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jul. 10, 2015

Here are a few things Maggie Wente admires about men:

Men get to the point....Men are direct. They don’t think emotions are all that interesting. Women are overly sensitive to emotions and tend to get all caught up in process.

Men don’t hold grudges.....Men just let it go (jk: forgiveness). They can get furiously angry with each other, and two weeks later they’re the best of friends. Women would be better off if we didn’t take stuff so personally.

Men externalize their failures....When men fail at something, they’re likely to blame it on their subordinates, their boss, market conditions, bad luck or sunspots. They seldom blame themselves (and if they do, they get over it). When women fail at something, they’re likely to conclude that they’re no good, and who were they kidding anyway?

Men are focused and persistent....they can’t multitask the way women do but they don’t get so distracted either.

Men have no problem being assertive....Research has found that most women will only apply for a promotion if they are 100-per-cent qualified for the job, and sometimes not even then. Men, on the other hand, will apply for a promotion just because they’re capable of breathing in and out.

Men are less complicated than women. -They don’t have to be in the mood to enjoy sex.
forgiveness  gender_gap  gender_relations  grudges  Margaret_Wente  men  multitasking  women 
july 2015 by jerryking
The Confidence Gap
MAY 2014 ISSUE | The Atlantic | Katty Kay and Claire Shipman
gender_gap  self-confidence  psychology  women  workplaces 
may 2015 by jerryking
Female-Run Venture Capital Funds Alter the Status Quo - NYTimes.com
APRIL 1, 2015| NYT | By CLAIRE CAIN MILLER.

Venture capitalists are, in a way, the gatekeepers to Silicon Valley, and if they are a group of white men who studied at places like Stanford, it is no wonder that most of the entrepreneurs fit the same mold. Venture firms with women as partners are three times as likely to invest in a company with a female chief executive and twice as likely to invest in one with women on the management team, according to the Babson College report.

The lack of female investors has cascading effects. Start-ups’ boards are composed mostly of venture capitalists, so they are often all men. A recent Fortune analysis found that of the 81 start-ups worth more than $1 billion, 5 percent had a female chief executive and 6 percent had a woman on the board. Other studies have found that male founders and directors are less likely to hire women as executives and engineers, or pay men and women equally.

“Honestly, there will be more female entrepreneurs if there are more female venture capitalists,
venture_capital  Silicon_Valley  vc  entrepreneur  founders  start_ups  women  gender_gap  boards_&_directors_&_governance  angels  gatekeepers  white_men 
april 2015 by jerryking
Venture capital’s vicious circle - The Globe and Mail
Leah Eichler

Special to The Globe and Mail

Published Friday, Nov. 07 2014
venture_capital  gender_gap  biases  start_ups 
november 2014 by jerryking
How women are losing the pundit war - The Globe and Mail
MARGARET WENTE
The Globe and Mail
Published Saturday, May. 24 2014
Margaret_Wente  women  pundits  Steve_Paikin  TVO  gender_gap 
may 2014 by jerryking
Closing the gender gap in coding - The Globe and Mail
JOSH O'KANE
The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, May. 20 2014
coding  gender_gap  women  software 
may 2014 by jerryking
Breaking into the boys' club of investment banking - The Globe and Mail
BOYD ERMAN
Breaking into the boys' club of investment banking Add to ...
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The Globe and Mail

Published Tuesday, Mar. 11 2014
women  Bay_Street  investment_banking  glass_ceilings  boards_&_directors_&_governance  Boyd_Erman  gender_gap  diversity 
march 2014 by jerryking
Four Executives on Succeeding in Business as a Woman - NYTimes.com
October 12, 2013 | NYT | By ADAM BRYANT.

You need to spend political capital — be unafraid to introduce people, compliment somebody when it’s deserved and stand up for something you really believe in, rather than just go with the flow. I don’t mean being a perennial troublemaker, but it’s about having conviction and courage. Spend that political capital you earn by being intellectually credible, by being a fighter for the people on your team when appropriate, and by arguing for principles that matter. Those are qualities that give you credit. If you’re waiting for the perfect moment to spend that capital, you’re going to be sidelined your whole career waiting to just kind of enter the ring.

Women can and should do a better job of helping one another to be in that transactional forum, and to get over the anxiety that we’re going to be found wanting on the wrong side of that equation. We’re undervaluing the role that we can play in the success of other people and the organization. So don’t be afraid to spend some of that political capital. You have to be well prepared, you have to be smart, you have to be on time, you have to be responsive, you have to be respectful, you have to have principles. But once you have all those things and you’ve built a track record, don’t wait for the perfect day.
women  CEOs  movingonup  lessons_learned  gender_gap  on-time  executive_management  leaders  leadership  political_capital  principled  courage  convictions  punctuality  transactions  transactional_relationships  troublemakers  responsiveness 
october 2013 by jerryking
Victorian values for the 21st century - The Globe and Mail
Margaret Wente

The Globe and Mail

Published Saturday, Oct. 05 2013

the real keys to success are far more old-fashioned – Victorian, even. They are self-regulation, conscientiousness and diligence. More than ever, perhaps, 21st-century success will require 19th-century values.....The trouble is that cultivating 19th-century habits in the 21st century isn’t easy. In Victorian times, self-regulation was reinforced by many kinds of external pressure, including social norms, religion, family and Queen. The consequences of lapsing from the straight and narrow – social disgrace, even ruin – could be severe. Today, you’re far more reliant on yourself to stay the course, and nobody else much cares if you don’t.....Daniel Akst argues in Temptation: Finding Self-Control in an Age of Excess, modern life requires an unnatural degree of self-control. ... in an age of super-affluence, it’s a constant struggle to keep our appetites in check. “It’s not that we have less willpower than we used to,” he writes, “but rather that modern life immerses us daily in a set of temptations far more evolved than we are.”

Self-discipline and high IQ often go together. But they are not the same. As Mr. Akst reports, self-discipline is a far better predictor of university grades than either IQ or SAT scores. ...many of America’s children have trouble making choices that require them to sacrifice short-term pleasure for long-term gain.”
21st._century  achievement_gaps  gender_gap  values  books  proclivities  self-control  self-discipline  Tyler_Cowen  Victorian  willpower  temptations  delayed_gratification  self-regulation 
october 2013 by jerryking
Harvard Business School Case Study - Gender Equity - NYTimes.com
By JODI KANTOR
September 7, 2013

The dean’s ambitions extended far beyond campus, to what Dr. Faust called in an interview an “obligation to articulate values.” The school saw itself as the standard-bearer for American business. Turning around its record on women, the new administrators assured themselves, could have an untold impact at other business schools, at companies populated by Harvard alumni and in the Fortune 500, where only 21 chief executives are women. The institution would become a laboratory for studying how women speak in group settings, the links between romantic relationships and professional status, and the use of everyday measurement tools to reduce bias.
gender_gap  HBS  business_schools  case_studies  women  Fortune_500  students  makeovers  leadership  Nitin_Nohria 
september 2013 by jerryking
A farewell to India: false miracles and true inspiration - The Globe and Mail
STEPHANIE NOLEN

DANAPUR, INDIA — The Globe and Mail

Last updated Saturday, Aug. 10 2013,

Poonam carries on. “Girls like us, if we take the opportunity given to us, we can become educated and get those jobs as teachers and nurses. It all depends on what you do with the chance you’re given. It used to be only for those others. Now, we also have that opportunity, if we take it. What used to be possible only for them is possible for us also.”
Stephanie_Nolen  India  women  Dalits  gender_gap  sexual_assault  sexual_harassment  caste__systems 
august 2013 by jerryking
A New U.S. International Economic Strategy - WSJ.com
February 5, 2013 | WSJ | by Robert Zoellick.

A New U.S. International Economic Strategy
Taking the lead on trade and open markets can enhance global security, opportunity and the prospects for liberty.

(1) First, this country should strengthen its continental base by building on the North American Free Trade Agreement with Canada and Mexico.
(2) the extraordinary monetary policies of late, led by the Federal Reserve's continued near-zero interest-rate policy, are taking us into uncharted territory.
(3)the U.S. needs to break the logjam on opening markets.
(4)Fourth, gender equality is not only fair and right—it is smart economics.
(5) Finally, the U.S. needs to match growth priorities of developing economies.
globalization  international_trade  Robert_Zoellick  NAFTA  IMF  WTO  economic_policy  gender_gap  entrepreneurship  Junior_Achievement  infrastructure 
february 2013 by jerryking
Celebrate boys’ boyness – and work with it -
Nov. 17 2012 |The Globe and Mail |by Margaret Wente.

Several public school systems have launched all-boys’ schools for failing boys. In New York, the Eagle Academy for Young Men is achieving impressive results for minority boys in a tough neighbourhood. These schools demand a lot. Their ethos is: We’ll help you succeed, but we’ll be tough on you, and you must claim responsibility. (By contrast, the attitude of Ontario’s public schools toward difficult boys is: We’ll let you pass if you leave us alone.)

If boys are failing schools and schools are failing boys, it’s really not too hard to see some of the reasons why. They really are fish out of water. Before the Industrial Revolution, boys spent their time with fathers and uncles, often engaged in strenuous physical activity. Now they spend their time in the world of women, sitting behind desks. If schools threw out the desks, they’d probably be a lot happier.

But schools can’t give them everything they need. Boys also need the company of men – men who will guide, instruct, esteem, respect and understand them. When asked about the happiest experience of their lives, boys often say it was the time they made something with their fathers. Their mothers matter, too – but, sometimes, there’s no substitute for Dad.
Margaret_Wente  masculinity  gender_gap 
february 2013 by jerryking
Why Men Fail - NYTimes.com
By DAVID BROOKS
September 10, 2012

To succeed today, you have to be able to sit still and focus attention in school at an early age. You have to be emotionally sensitive and aware of context. You have to communicate smoothly. For genetic and cultural reasons, many men stink at these tasks.

But, in her fascinating new book, “The End of Men,” Hanna Rosin posits a different theory. It has to do with adaptability. Women, Rosin argues, are like immigrants who have moved to a new country. They see a new social context, and they flexibly adapt to new circumstances. Men are like immigrants who have physically moved to a new country but who have kept their minds in the old one. They speak the old language. They follow the old mores. Men are more likely to be rigid; women are more fluid.

This theory has less to do with innate traits and more to do with social position. When there’s big social change, the people who were on the top of the old order are bound to cling to the old ways. The people who were on the bottom are bound to experience a burst of energy. They’re going to explore their new surroundings more enthusiastically.
failure  David_Brooks  women  gender_gap  men  adaptability  books 
september 2012 by jerryking
Women, Welch Clash at Forum
May 4, 2012 | WSJ | By JOHN BUSSEY.

He had this advice for women who want to get ahead: Grab tough assignments to prove yourself, get line experience, and embrace serious performance reviews and the coaching inherent in them.

"Without a rigorous appraisal system, without you knowing where you stand...and how you can improve, none of these 'help' programs that were up there are going to be worth much to you," he said. Mr. Welch said later that the appraisal "is the best way to attack bias" because the facts go into the document, which both parties have to sign.
Jack_Welch  GE  work_life_balance  rigour  gender_gap  movingonup  executive_management  performance  performance_reviews 
may 2012 by jerryking
The High Cost of the Gender Gap - WSJ.com
NOVEMBER 21, 2011 | WSJ | By REBECCA BLUMENSTEIN.

The High Cost of the Gender Gap
Dominic Barton, Geena Davis and Debra Lee on why CEOs need to focus more on women.
By REBECCA BLUMENSTEIN
Viacom  BET  McKinsey  actors  gender_gap  Dominic_Barton  CEOs  women  executive_management  high-cost 
december 2011 by jerryking
The 'H' Word - WSJ.com
APRIL 12, 2007 | WSJ | By LIONEL TIGER.

The coercive trend is that ordinary African-American males earn decreasing amounts of money compared to women of their community. They are more accident-prone, more imprisoned and have frailer family lives than women do. Is this why they smoothly call them whores, out of desperate resentment at their own ineffectuality?

There are structural reasons for this beyond the craven crumminess of popular culture. When African and Arab slavers captured people for the New World, they preferred to break up families. Subsequent slave-owning policies sustained that pattern. As well, many slaves were taken from West African societies in which biological mothers and fathers didn't necessary share child caretaking but mother and her brother did. When I lived in Ghana years ago, Christian families with father and mother in the household were called "same muddah same fadduh" in the street. It's likely that continuities persist, as they certainly do in Caribbean societies.

There's also a massive contemporary reason for the invidiousness many African-American men feel in the presence of women -- their relative failure in a school system which broadly favors females. By college age, there is a sharp fall-off of male enrollment in general and of African-American men specifically.
Colleges_&_Universities  slang  basketball  women  disrespect  athletes_&_athletics  race  languages  profanity  misogyny  African-Americans  gender_gap  slavery  masculinity  Afro-Caribbeans 
november 2011 by jerryking
The Missing Fifth - NYTimes.com
May 9, 2011| NYT | By DAVID BROOKS. Americans should be
especially alert to signs that the country is becoming less vital &
industrious. One of those signs comes from the labor market. As my
colleague David Leonhardt points out, in 1954, about 96 % of American
men between the ages of 25 & 54 worked. Today that number is around
80 %. One-fifth of all men in their prime working ages are not getting
up & going to work...The result is this: There are more idle men now
than at any time since the Great Depression, & this time the
problem is mostly structural, not cyclical. These men will find it hard
to attract spouses. Many will pick up habits that have a corrosive
cultural influence on those around them. The country will not benefit
from their potential abilities. This is a big problem. It can’t be
addressed through the sort of short-term Keynesian stimulus some on the
left are still fantasizing about. It can’t be solved by simply reducing
the size of govt. as some on the right imagine.
cultural_corrosion  David_Brooks  gender_gap  unemployment  men  Great_Depression  participation_rates  structural_change  Keynesian  joblessness  habits  values 
may 2011 by jerryking
The Online World of Female Desire - WSJ.com
APRIL 30, 2011 | WSJ | By OGI OGAS. For women indulging
their curiosity, Internet erotica is less about flesh than about finding
Mr. Right.
sexuality  gender_gap  erotic  women 
may 2011 by jerryking
Mad About the Gender Gap? Blame Nature | BNET
By Penelope Trunk | March 31, 2011

97 Comments
gender_gap 
april 2011 by jerryking
The financing gender gap - The Globe and Mail
Mar. 04, 2011|Globe and Mail | Special to MARJO JOHNE
An October 2010 report by the SME Financing Data Initiative – a joint
project by Industry Canada, Statistics Canada and Finance Canada to
gather information on financing for small and medium-sized enterprises –
found that, in 2007, 85 % of female-owned small businesses that applied
for a loan were approved. By comparison, the approval rate for
male-owned small businesses was 96 %. Female-owned businesses also got
less money, receiving an average amount of $118,000, compared with
$284,000 for the companies owned by men. At the same time, female
entrepreneurs had to provide lenders with more documentation – such as
personal financial statements, appraisals of assets and cash flow
projections – than male entrepreneurs, the report found.
gender_gap  entrepreneurship  women  uToronto  glass_ceilings  funding  financial_statements  SMEs  venture_capital 
march 2011 by jerryking
A Capital Idea for Women
October 4, 2007 | New York Times | By LISA BELKIN. Open, the
small-business arm of American Express, is a founding sponsor of M3,
and in a survey of 627 customers released this week, it found that while
men say their No. 1 goal is “growing the business,” women say their top
priority is “maintaining the business.”
women  funding  small_business  AMEX  growth  gender_gap 
december 2010 by jerryking
Book review: What Women Want - WSJ.com
JULY 6, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By MEGHAN COX GURDON. Reviews 'What Women Want' By Paco Underhill
Simon & Schuster, 214 pages, $25 Buying Without Guys. Cleanliness, safety and, please, no salesmen on commission.
book_reviews  gender_gap  consumer_research  women  Paco_Underhill  observations 
july 2010 by jerryking
The new heavyweight champions
June 12, 2010 | The Globe and Mail | Margaret Wente. 30 yrs.
ago, most of these men handily out-earned their wives. But the situation
has reversed. Could this be the future? Very likely. At every age and
income level, women are more likely than ever before to be the major or
sole breadwinner in the family...The modern, postindustrial economy
rewards people with a high degree of emotional intelligence who can
navigate complex social networks. It rewards people who are flexible,
adaptable and co-operative, who have good verbal skills, and who can
work diligently, sit still and focus long enough to get the credentials
they need to land a job. Women tend to be better at these things than
men. They’re also good at all the gender-neutral stuff, such as sales
and analytical skills. Meantime, as muscle jobs vanish, men are showing
little or no interest in becoming dental hygienists, kindergarten
teachers or anything else that requires a high degree of people skills
and nurturing.
women  workplaces  gender_gap  Margaret_Wente  life_skills  people_skills  EQ  emotional_intelligence 
june 2010 by jerryking
Less Educated Men Face Brutal Job Market - WSJ.com
MAY 6, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By DAVID WESSEL. It's
hard to exaggerate how bad the job market is. Here's one arresting fact:
One of every five men 25 to 54 isn't working. Even more alarming, the
jobs that many of these men, or those like them, once had in
construction, factories and offices aren't coming back. "A good guess…is
that when the economy recovers five years from now, one in six men who
are 25 to 54 will not be working," Lawrence Summers, the president's
economic adviser, said the other day.
David_Wessel  unemployment  African-Americans  gender_gap  masculinity  joblessness 
may 2010 by jerryking
Events find their feminine side
Jul 5, 2007 | Financial Times pg. 14 | by Brooke Masters and
Emiko Terazono. Companies are increasingly hosting private fashion
shows and boutique evenings to attract women executives.
ProQuest  women  business_development  networking  mentoring  gender_gap  event_marketing  sponsorships 
february 2010 by jerryking
Playing field uneven for female MBA grads - The Globe and Mail
Elizabeth Church Education Reporter

From Thursday's Globe and Mail Published on Thursday, Feb. 18, 2010
Elizabeth_Church  business_schools  women  gender_gap  MBAs 
february 2010 by jerryking
The Female Economy - HBR.org
September 2009 | Harvard Business Review | by Michael J.
Silverstein and Kate Sayre. Women feel vastly underserved. They still
appear to be undervalued in the marketplace and underestimated in the
workplace. They have too many demands on their time and constantly
juggle conflicting priorities—work, home, and family. Few companies have
responded to their need for time-saving solutions or for products and
services designed specifically for them. Opportunities lie in Food,
Fitness, Beauty, Apparel, Financial Services and Healthcare.
gender_gap  female  women  marketing  underserved 
august 2009 by jerryking
Guys Left Behind - WSJ.com
JUNE 2, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | By MARK PENN with E.
Kinney Zalesne. Women are succeeding in an ever-widening range of areas,
while there is a statistically significant and growing group of guys
who are just not going to make it.
Mark_Penn  gender_gap  microtrends  masculinity  achievement_gaps 
june 2009 by jerryking
Court Opening Prompts Question About Whether Gender Matters - WSJ.com
MAY 14, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | by JENNIFER S. FORSYTH.

Should minority (i.e. racial, gender, disabled) U.S. Supreme Court
justices see themselves as needing to represent the views of particular
groups, or as acting as an umpire who remains neutral about who wins and
loses?
U.S._Supreme_Court  nominees  disadvantages  law  legal  gender_gap  gender_relations  judges 
may 2009 by jerryking
globeandmail.com: The still-gaping gender gap
May 5, 2008 G&M article by Marlene Habib on the declining enrollment of female engineering students.
recruiting  engineering  Colleges_&_Universities  decline  gender_gap  female  women  enrollment  retention 
january 2009 by jerryking

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