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jerryking : generalists   9

On GPS: Epstein on why it pays to be a generalist
Fareed Zakaria, GPS

David Epstein, author of "Range," tells Fareed that people should explore many different fields to get ahead in the global economy of the 2020's.
2020s  authors  books  Fareed_Zakaria  generalists  Managing_Your_Career 
6 weeks ago by jerryking
The biggest gender divide is in mathematics
September 5, 2019 | | Financial Times| by Carola Hoyos.

Numeracy is vital for everyone. But according to Alain Dehaze, chief executive of Adecco, the world’s biggest recruiting company, the most valuable mathematical skills in a more automated future, especially for those people who can also communicate them to generalists, are the ability to spot patterns; to problem solve logically; and to work with statistics, probability and large data sets to see into the future.
biases  Communicating_&_Connecting  culture  gender_gap  generalists  girls  high_schools  massive_data_sets  mathematics  numeracy  parenting  pattern_recognition  probability  problem_solving  statistics  trend_spotting  women 
september 2019 by jerryking
Trump, Kushner and the businessman fallacy
Simon Kuper MARCH 8, 2018
The “businessman fallacy” — the notion that a rich businessman (never a woman) can run government better than a mere politician — is Donald Trump’s basic promise. That’s why the combustion of his son-in-law, fellow real-estate heir and senior adviser Jared Kushner — whose business dealings in the White House scream conflict of interest — is so telling. Kushner incarnates the businessman fallacy.......The businessman-turned-politician is often blinded by hubris. This usually stems from the “money delusion”: the idea that life is a race to make money, and that rich people (“winners”) therefore possess special wisdom.

Many businessmen imagine they pulled themselves up by the bootstraps in a free market, something that more people could do if only there was “less government in business”. This self-image usually omits context: the fact, say, that the businessman’s father built the company (before being jailed on a ridiculous technicality) or that government enforced his contracts and schooled his employees.....Rich Americans tend to feel contempt for politicians because they have learnt to treat them as lowly service providers who will sit up and beg for donations.
self-imagery  Simon_Kuper  Donald_Trump  Jared_Kushner  nepotism  White_House  conflicts_of_interest  oversimplification  privately_held_companies  family-owned_businesses  hubris  generalists  businessman_fallacy  heirs 
march 2018 by jerryking
Biographer Walter Isaacson explains what made Leonardo da Vinci a genius - The Globe and Mail
RUSSELL SMITH
SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL
PUBLISHED DECEMBER 4, 2017

What we can learn from Leonardo constitutes the peculiar last chapter of this otherwise sober and cautious biography. At its end Isaacson moves from his role as historian into something closer to self-help guru. He lists a set of Leonardish attributes for us to emulate that sound a lot like advice to tech startups: "Retain a childlike sense of wonder… Think visually… Avoid silos… Collaborate…" Add this to repeated comparisons to Steve Jobs, a previous biographee of Isaacson's, and one is reminded that this is a very American biography (Isaacson was managing editor of Time magazine for years), one that sees "creativity" as primarily a corporate asset.
Russell_Smith  books  biographies  genius  Leonardo_da_Vinci  Walter_Isaacson  Steve_Jobs  polymaths  foxes  hedgehogs  renaissance  cross-disciplinary  cross-pollination  generalists  curiosity  creativity  collaboration  silo_mentality 
december 2017 by jerryking
What to Learn in College to Stay One Step Ahead of Computers - NYTimes.com
MAY 22, 2015 | NYT | By ROBERT J. SHILLER.

The successful occupations, by this measure, shared certain characteristics: People who practiced them needed complex communication skills and expert knowledge. Such skills included an ability to convey “not just information but a particular interpretation of information.” They said that expert knowledge was broad, deep and practical, allowing the solution of “uncharted problems.”

These attributes may not be as beneficial in the future. But the study certainly suggests that a college education needs to be broad and general, and not defined primarily by the traditional structure of separate departments staffed by professors who want, most of all, to be at the forefront of their own narrow disciplines.....In a separate May 5 statement, Prof. Sean D. Kelly, chairman of the General Education Review Committee, said a Harvard education should give students “an art of living in the world.”

But how should professors do this? Perhaps we should prepare students for entrepreneurial opportunities suggested by our own disciplines. Even departments entirely divorced from business could do this by suggesting enterprises, nonprofits and activities in which students can later use their specialized knowledge....I continue to update the course, thinking about how I can integrate its lessons into an “art of living in the world.” I have tried to enhance my students’ sense that finance should be the art of financing important human activities, of getting people (and robots someday) working together to accomplish things that we really want done.
21st._century  automation  Colleges_&_Universities  college-educated  Communicating_&_Connecting  continuing_education  continuous_learning  curriculum  education  entrepreneurship  expertise  finance  future-proofing  generalists  Harvard  indispensable  interdisciplinary  interpretation  machine_learning  Managing_Your_Career  new_graduates  Robert_Shiller  skills  students  syllabus  uncharted_problems  Yale 
may 2015 by jerryking
Striking a Balance Between Expertise, Wearing Many Hats - WSJ.com
April 30, 1996 | WSJ | By HAL LANCASTER.
Managers Must Balance Expertise and Generality.

SHOULD TODAY'S managers be generalists or specialists?

Generalists, says the conventional wisdom, because today's shrinking corporations are eliminating so many specialist functions. The people left are in charge of more employees and more departments, managing teams made up of various specialties. Besides, today's hot technological specialty can quickly become obsolete.

As usual, however, the conventional wisdom is an oversimplification. Most people in big companies still advance based on accomplishments in some area of expertise. And to keep up in fast-moving markets, companies often need even deeper levels of expertise than they once did.
Managing_Your_Career  Hal_Lancaster  generalists  specialists  oversimplification  expertise 
december 2012 by jerryking
Technology Review: Whither the Renaissance Man?
May 2005 | Technology Review | By Michael Hawley

We need to save the diversity of the individual. The irony is that
renaissance men and women are in short supply. Such an intense global
mix of cultures, ideas, and innovations, all apparently a mouse click
away, would seem to demand broad educational perspectives. Yet most
schools persist in turning out laser-focused young professionals. To
make a dent in a particular field, a person has to devote a good chunk
of his or her lifetime just to getting to the starting line. This
doesn't favor the jack-of-all-trades.
Benjamin_Franklin  cross-disciplinary  cross-pollination  curriculum  education  foxes  generalists  hedgehogs  life_long_learning  polymaths  renaissance  Renaissance_Man 
may 2009 by jerryking

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