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jerryking : gentrification   28

Thanks to a billionaire, Detroit is new and improved – but for whom?
November 18, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | by ADRIAN MORROW, U.S. CORRESPONDENT

Detroit's urban renaissance has also drawn tough criticism. For one, Quicken and Bedrock are accused of building an affluent island in the centre of a low-income city. While Dan Gilbert’s spending has revitalized the central business district, much of Detroit remains economically distressed with neighbourhoods full of boarded-up businesses and burnt-out houses. Detroit’s racial divides factor in, too: Recent developments have tended to concentrate in the whiter neighbourhoods of a city where 79 per cent of the population is black. For another, Bedrock and its related companies have received US$767-million worth of government subsidies and tax breaks since 2010. To some, this is an egregious use of funds when Detroit’s schools and transit system are struggling. Mr. Gilbert’s critics argue a man with a net worth Forbes estimates at US$6.8-billion has no need for government assistance.
Whether Mr. Gilbert is the hero Detroit needed to pull it back from the precipice or an unaccountable billionaire wielding an uncomfortable amount of civic power, his rise represents an extraordinary moment in U.S. urbanism. The rapid rebirth and future of one of the country’s greatest and most troubled cities rests largely in the hands of one man and his corporate empire, which is both animating the metropolis with its workforce, and directly shaping the look and feel of its streets and buildings........the subsidies have been “necessary,” but the city and state have done too little to extract benefits such as affordable housing and heritage preservation in exchange. Rather than a divide between downtown and neighbourhoods, or Mr. Gilbert and community bootstrappers, she argued, all of these elements have to work together.
anchor_tenants  Dan_Gilbert  decline  Detroit  downtown_core  gentrification  hollowing_out  income_inequality  moguls  property_development  Quicken_Loans   racial_disparities  refurbished  rejuvenation  revivals  subsidies  tax_subsidies  urban_renaissance  urban_renewal  white-collar 
november 2019 by jerryking
Where Does Major American Art Come From? Mapping the Whitney Biennial.
July 5, 2019 | The New York Times | SCOTT REINHARD, DEREK WATKINS, ALICIA DeSANTIS, RUMSEY TAYLOR, and SIDDHARTHA MITTER.

The first Whitney Annual in 1932 was transgressive.....In 1973, the exhibition became a Biennial, and its history is the history of American modern and contemporary art. Or, at least one version of that history: one centered in New York City, one heavily white and male. That is no longer the case. This year, a majority of the show’s artists are women, and they are racially and ethnically diverse. New York, however, remains home to nearly half of them.

Until 1975, the exhibition catalogs listed the addresses of the artists who were included each year. Mapping these locations tells a story of influence and power — but also one of friendships and creative communities, of housing prices and economic change, of landscape and light. Here are some of its facets.
art  artists  bohemians  Chicago  contemporary_art  creative_class  creative_types  diversity  gentrification  geographic_concentration  Greenwich_Village  location  Los_Angeles  Manhattan  mapping  museums  New_York_City  overlay_networks  prestige  proximity  SoHo  transgressiveness  white_men 
july 2019 by jerryking
Don’t mourn bohemia — it’s everywhere now
DECEMBER 28, 2018 | Financial Times | Janan Ganesh.

We think of offbeat enclaves as a thing of the past. But bohemia isn’t gone, it’s just permeated the whole of city life.
bohemians  creative_types  creative_class  enclaves  Janan_Ganesh  neighbourhoods  gentrification  New_York_City  offbeat 
december 2018 by jerryking
Cause or effect? The link between gentrification and violent crime
July 12, 2018 | | Financial Times | by Nathan Brooker YESTERDAY.

London, which is experiencing a sustained increase in violent offences as crime rates in other global cities such as New York, Sydney and Hong Kong continue to fall......The escalation of violence has been linked to provocation on social media, increased competition in the drugs trade, a reduction in police measures such as stop and search and an overall drop in police funding— the Met has seen its annual budget cut by about 20 per cent since 2010-11, and it has lost 10 per cent of its police officers in that time......However, one factor that is often overlooked and, according to professional and academic observers, has played a key role in exacerbating London’s recent crime wave, is its gentrifying property market.

Areas of London that have higher levels of deprivation also tend to have higher crime rates.........The level of violence you see is getting much more extreme......Gentrification has had a significant impact on the area....“One of the issues young people have in Hackney Wick is the lack of aspiration, the lack of hope,” says Allen. “They’re all living in a rich, diverse city, but it still feels very separate to them. It’s not their development; it’s somebody else’s. They think they won’t be able to live in the area they were brought up in because they’re not going to be able to spend £600,000 on an apartment.”.........gentrification has not only affected gang recruitment..... it has fundamentally altered how some gangs operate.........“It changed their idea of territory, since some senior members were forced out of the area [by the redevelopment] and had to commute in, for want of a better term,” he says. “Ten years ago there was a very strong connection to territory. There was an emotional connection. But the redevelopment changed that. The only territory that was left was the market place — the drugs market place — and that needs to be protected.”

It’s the protection of that market — one both lucrative and highly nebulous — that is behind some of the increase in violent crime. Without the clear boundaries an estate or a postcode might provide, he says, and with the high value of the drugs trade upping the stakes, transgressions are met with more intense violence.....The reasons behind the dramatic decline in New York’s murder count are much argued over: the growing economy, the end of the crack epidemic have all been put up as possible causes. Yet improvements to policing brought in under former New York police commissioner Bill Bratton cannot be overlooked.

Bratton’s policies, which included clampdowns on various low-level offences, and an increase in stop-question-and-frisk, are often mischaracterised as a zero-tolerance approach to policing, he says.

“What he really did was a management innovation.” Bratton, who was in the office 1994-96 and returned in 2014-16, introduced CompStat, measures that used computer programs to map where and when crimes were taking place, and how police resources were being shared. “When [Bratton] took over, the largest number of cops were on the day shift, but the largest number of crimes took place on the evening shift and the night shift,” he says. Bratton reallocated officers accordingly. They had a slogan: “Put cops on the dots”.......the most important thing Bratton did, Kleiman says, was make management more accountable, hauling in three precinct captains each week to grill them on their CompStat data. During his first year as commissioner, Bratton replaced something like two-thirds of the city’s 76 precinct commanders......The problem with fear is that it’s an unhelpful response. Fear raises money for private security firms, not community programmes; it improves funding to free schools, not failing academies; it promotes only the most brutal, careless forms of policing. In communities that are undergoing gentrification, fear further divides the haves and the have-nots: decreasing the kinds of relationships that might aid social mobility and better connect disadvantaged youth with the city they live in.

And what gets forgotten, says Allen, is that fear goes both ways. “A lot of the young people that get caught up in youth violence are caught up because they’re vulnerable and they’re frightened,”
accountability  Bill_Bratton  budget_cuts  carding  causality  CompStat  criminality  criminal_justice_system  data  deprivations  disaffection  fear  gentrification  homicides  killings  London  New_York_City  NYPD  organized_crime  policing  property_markets  redevelopments  United_Kingdom  violent_crime  youth 
july 2018 by jerryking
Another great migration is under way: Black Americans are leaving big cities for the suburbs - The Globe and Mail
MARCUS GEE
CHICAGO
PUBLISHED APRIL 29, 2018

The dwindling of black Chicago is all the more poignant when set against the dramatic story of its rise. Over the course of the Great Migration, Chicago’s black population grew from just 44,000 to more than a million. At one point, writes Isabel Wilkerson in her 2010 history The Warmth of Other Suns, 10,000 people were arriving in the city every month, pouring off northbound trains onto Chicago railway platforms.

Chicago became a capital of black America, enjoying a cultural renaissance that rivalled Harlem’s in New York. Famous figures such as gospel singer Mahalia Jackson, boxer Joe Louis and poet Gwendolyn Brooks were among Chicago’s residents.
Chicago  Marcus_Gee  internal_migration  suburban  crime  black_flight  gentrification  the_South  African-Americans  Great_Migration  Isabel_Wilkerson 
april 2018 by jerryking
The Summer of Love: A Walking Tour of San Francisco, 50 Years Later
Unfurling from the eastern border of San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park, the Haight served as the epicenter of America’s 1960s counterculture movement. “The Haight-Ashbury was the product of teen rebellion against 1950s’ regimentation and the Vietnam War,” said a guide for the local Flower Power Walking Tour who goes by the name Stannous Flouride. “The anarchic aspect was seen as a threat against the establishment but ultimately had a profound influence on American culture.” Cheap rents, more than anything else, drew the first wave of bohemians in the early 1960s. Legions followed, cresting in 1967 when some 100,000 students, musicians and others flocked to San Francisco for a summer of drug-enhanced communing and revelry that horrified parents. This year, to mark the anniversary, events from concerts to art exhibits are being staged throughout the Bay Area (see summeroflove2017.com for details).

Hit songs of 1967 included the Airplane’s “White Rabbit,” “San Franciscan Nights” (inspired by a night Eric Burdon spent with Janis Joplin) and the blissed-out ballad “San Francisco (Be Sure to Wear Flowers in Your Hair).”
1967  San_Francisco  psychedelic  summertime  epicenters  neighbourhoods  gentrification  bohemians  things_to_do  anniversaries  counterculture 
may 2017 by jerryking
Modern African Art Is Being Gentrified
MAY 20, 2017 | The New York Times | By CHIKA OKEKE-AGULU.

.Sotheby’s held its first auction of modern and contemporary African art on Tuesday, where 83 pieces by artists from Cameroon to South Africa sold for a total of nearly $4 million.....The sale at Sotheby’s, the granddaddy of auctioneers, most likely signals the beginning of a more serious interest from Western museums, which may finally start to consider such work worthy of inclusion in their permanent collections........Now that it is seen as high culture, the art and artists are gaining value, investors are jostling to get a piece of the action, and private collections are growing in Africa and around the world.....African contemporary artists have also moved beyond nationalism and are more likely to sound off about globalization and complex identities. But the continent’s masses will be the biggest losers. ...That’s because whole countries in Africa cannot boast of a single art museum of any renown......During the colonial era, bands of looters — missionaries, scholars, security forces and fortune hunters — fanned out across the continent and, by force or guile, carted away vast quantities of Africa’s artistic heritage. Many of these masterpieces of ancient and traditional African sculpture now reside in major private and public collections in the West, with little chance of ever returning to Africa......We cannot let this history repeat itself. But what is to be done?

African collectors and those based in Africa must participate in this market, for it is more likely that their collections will stay on the continent......As Africa overcomes years of dictatorships and civil wars, its fledgling democracies have seen the rise of a wealthy, cosmopolitan class interested in supporting art and culture........The spread of private collections is, however, not the long-term goal. Rather, it is a step toward a future in which well-run public collections are supported by governmental and nongovernmental institutions.....and thus serve the greater cultural good........Even so, Africa cannot solely rely on the good will of individual collectors. State agencies and municipal governments must foster a richer cultural experience for their citizenry. And they can do this by building and maintaining museums in major cities. The usual practice of treating art and culture as a superfluous aspect of the human experience undeserving of public support is not tenable.

If museums exist and are run well, the art will come.
Sotheby's  Africa  museums  collectors  collectibles  human_experience  patrons  art  artists  artwork  auctions  contemporary_art  gentrification 
may 2017 by jerryking
Actually, Many ‘Inner Cities’ Are Doing Great - The New York Times
Emily Badger OCT. 11, 2016
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African-Americans  urban  cities  gentrification  poverty  Donald_Trump  Campaign_2016 
october 2016 by jerryking
A city divided: ‘I’ll pray for peace, but I won’t pray for Baltimore’ - The Globe and Mail
CRAIG OFFMAN
BALTIMORE — The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, May. 01 2015,

Baltimore’s unrest could be chalked up to the same kind of tensions that divide other U.S. cities: poor getting poorer, despair and racism, or all of those tied together.

Sandtown-Winchester is also part of a wider trend in which poverty is fanning out across the country. According to the centrist Brookings Institution, the population of census tracts where at least four in 10 people live at or below the federal poverty line – the people who face heightened risk factors such as violent crime, dilapidated housing and poor schooling – increased by 72 per cent between 2000 and 2012.

Like New Haven and Yale, or Harlem and Columbia, Baltimore is home to a wealthy, highly ranked university. Johns Hopkins (where I was once a graduate student) is a massive civic employer, and its presence is spreading across the city, a gentrification process that concerns many urban advocates.
Baltimore  Freddie_Gray  Johns_Hopkins  white_flight  urban  Brookings  gentrification  violent_crime  risk_factors 
may 2015 by jerryking
Building the business of art - The Globe and Mail
TIM ALAMENCIAK
From Saturday's Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jun. 03, 2011

Artscape president and CEO Tim Jones spends his days finding and
creating spaces around the city for artists. His big idea for Toronto
would be to give artists the tools – under one roof – to develop the
business side of their work...Founded in 1986, Artscape grew out of the
Toronto Arts Council’s recognition that it needed to defend artists’
live-work space. Since then, the not-for-profit has been working against
the forces of gentrification to maintain affordable studio space.
affordability  artists  creative_class  incubators  art  business_development  business_planning  gentrification  Artscape 
june 2011 by jerryking
The City as a Problem - Ta-Nehisi Coates - National - The Atlantic
Mar 11 2011 | The Atlantic | Ta-Nehisi Coates. "Given that
Detroit story is now up, I wanted to give another shout out to two books
which really helped me find my way. The first is Thomas Sugrue's The
Origins Of The Urban Crisis. If you have any interest in the history of
cities, this book is required reading....I'd also toss in Robert Conot's
problematic American Odyssey. It's the best overall history of Detroit
I've read.
Detroit  cities  race_relations  urban_decline  racism  gentrification  Ta-Nehisi_Coates  origin_story  public_policy  books  root_cause 
march 2011 by jerryking
Diverse, talented city a laggard on innovation; Other North American metropolitan areas such as Boston and Seattle are doing better at commercializing the ideas generated by their creative class
Aug 17, 2009 | Toronto Star. pg. A.11 | Kevin Stolarick. "We
share the concerns of our colleagues at the University of Toronto Cities
Centre whose recent report, The Three Cities within Toronto, showed
that the city's core is becoming gentrified, with visible minorities
moving to the fringes along major transportation arteries." "As we move
into the creative age, Toronto must continue to build on its strengths -
its multicultural and talented workforce - and leverage these to become
more innovative."
downtown_core  Roger_Martin  Rotman  Toronto  creative_economy  economic_development  strengths  multiculturalism  gentrification  income_inequality  commercialization  visible_minorities 
september 2009 by jerryking
A Tale of Several Cities: What explains why Boston flourishes while Philadelphia flounders?
Friday, October 20, 2006 12:01 A.M. EDT, WSJ op-ed by JULIA VITULLO-MARTIN.

Why isn't Philadelphia Boston? Why does Boston prosper, people and businesses outbidding one another to get in, while Philadelphia languishes, with acres of vacant and underused property announcing the lack of local demand? .......The answers are not to be found in conventional 20th-century analysis, which emphasized the seemingly unsolvable urban crisis: the decline of industrial jobs, the burdens of excessive taxation, the inevitability of racial tensions and the dominance of geography....At least part of the answer stems from their underlying cultures..... In his "Puritan Boston and Quaker Philadelphia" (1979), E. Digby Baltzell argued that Boston Brahmins, with their belief in authority and leadership, embraced a sense of responsibility for civic life, while Philadelphia Gentlemen, with their inward but judgmental Quaker ways were deeply unconcerned about their city's welfare.....cultural analysis -- long out of fashion as too soft (as as opposed to econometrics) or too racist (who is to say that one culture is better than another?) -- is due for a comeback. .....The old answer of urban success was deterministic: taxes and geography.....as the historian Richard Wade has noted for years, against the tide of his field, this theory has its flaws: If the sheer excellence of a harbor truly determined a city's fate, then the greatest city in America would be Upper Sandusky, Ohio....What flourishing cities often have in common, instead, are two crucial cultural characteristics: combativeness and cunning.....That same energy contributes to New York's cyclical boom-and-bust nature, regularly pushing speculation beyond the limits of an exuberant boom, thereby encouraging a bust. ....Cunning and combativeness, however, often restore cities financially without making them many new friends, except, perhaps, for the young -- who, for the past two decades, have been returning in great numbers to the old neighborhoods long ago abandoned by their parents and grandparents....But what makes cities successful -- or even just lovable -- can seldom be quantified.
boom-to-bust  municipalities  Toronto  ECONOMY  city  cities  Boston  Philadelphia  gentrification  cultural_analysis  cultural_values  leadership  Boston_Brahmins  bubbles 
february 2009 by jerryking

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