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jerryking : glass_bottles   2

Why glass milk bottle deliveries are back
APRIL 13, 2018 | FT | by Carl Wilkinson.

Milk & More offers what Müller calls “a farm shop on wheels” with more than 200 locally sourced premium products (as well as normal and organic milk, it stocks free-range eggs, biscuits, bread, bacon, organic cheese and veg), which can be ordered online up to 9pm the night before and be waiting on your doorstep by 7am “like magic”. This year, Müller is investing a further £20m in the Milk & More business, revamping IT, upgrading machinery and — most visibly — from this month rolling out a new fleet of more than 200 electric floats to replace many of the older diesel vehicles used on longer rural rounds. “David Attenborough has reignited people’s love of the great British milkman,” he says.

Yet most of the investment in Milk & More was put in place well before Blue Planet II aired. What did Müller — who is Swiss and recalls visiting his local farm as a boy to collect milk in buckets — spot in the ailing business?

“We saw three general trends,” he says. “Customers want to know what they’re eating and who produced it. People are environmentally conscious and want to do their bit to reduce plastic waste. That’s why we kept the glass bottle and decided to keep the factory open. It’s great packaging. And finally, community values are becoming more important. The human touch and the sense of community are becoming more important in today’s world.”
dairy  home-delivery  tracking  traceability  last_mile  milkmen  glass_bottles 
april 2018 by jerryking
Dairies Profit From Home Delivery Resurgence - WSJ.com
May 15, 2007 | WSJ | Gwendolyn Bounds.

As American consumers rush toward healthier, home-grown foods, the old-fashioned trade of home milk delivery is making a comeback in pockets around the country. And that appetite for wholesome fare, coupled with rising gas prices, is giving an unexpected marketing boost to some tiny dairies and local milk distributors, helping them compete against larger rivals who saturate store shelves....For its part, Crescent Ridge, believing its core business was strong, took advantage of the difficulties by purchasing the trucks, customer lists and assets of other small struggling dairies.

Today, the small business has about $7 million in annual sales, serves 6,000 home-delivery customers and is profitable. Its milkmen are paid $40,000 to $50,000 a year, have 401(k)s and health benefits. What's more, the milkmen and glass bottles are now a core marketing asset -- a nostalgic chit that distinguishes Crescent Ridge products from competitors'.
dairy  small_business  Gwendolyn_Bounds  home-delivery  milkmen  glass_bottles  last_mile  nostalgia 
january 2013 by jerryking

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