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jerryking : glass_ceilings   21

Where Women Fall Behind at Work: The First Step Into Management - WSJ
Oct. 15, 2019 | WSJ | By Vanessa Fuhrmans.

Long before bumping into any glass ceiling, many women run into obstacles trying to grasp the very first rung of the management ladder—and not because they are pausing their careers to raise children—a new, five-year landmark study shows. As a result, it’s early in many women’s careers, not later, when they fall dramatically behind men in promotions, blowing open a gender gap that then widens every step up the chain...... fix that broken bottom rung of the corporate ladder, and companies could reach near-parity all the way up to their top leadership roles within a generation.....“Bias still gets in the way—bias of who you know, who’s like you, or who performs and operates the same way you perform and operate, whose style is more similar.....Employers’ moves to diversify their most senior echelons could provide a road map.....“We’ve seen that if companies really put their minds to it, they can bring about change that matters,” Ms. Thomas says. “If they can apply the same extra elbow grease that they do at the top to the broken rung.........The numbers show that the first step is the steepest for women. But why is that? What’s holding women back from climbing that first rung into management?

It isn’t for lack of ambition..... while many employers have increased their efforts to groom and elevate more senior women—a smaller, select group—fewer have applied the same rigor to cultivating more junior female managers....The upshot: At nearly every career stage, the disparities between men and women have narrowed only marginally since the Women in the Workplace research began in 2015. Even in industries with largely female entry-level workforces, such as retail and health care, men come to dominate the management ranks—a phenomenon that Haig Nalbantian, a labor economist and co-leader of consulting firm Mercer LLC’s Workforce Sciences Institute, calls “the flip.......even in many “female-friendly” sectors, entry-level women still tend to get hired into jobs with limited upward mobility, such as bank tellers or customer-service staff. ..“When companies ask, ‘What’s the one thing we can do systemically?’ we say, ‘It’s not quotas, it’s not targets,’” says Mr. Nalbantian. “It’s about how do you position women and minorities to succeed in the roles that are likely to lead to higher-level positions.”......The takeaway for some women is that they have to assemble their own career ladder.....To secure a sponsor, “you’ve got to consistently perform, have a strong brand and deliver. That’s just table stakes,” she says. “But a lot of people do that and might still not move, because they don’t have the right support.”
barriers_to_entry  biases  coaching  diversity  entry-level  female-friendly  glass_ceilings  gender_gap  management  movingonup  obstacles  sponsorships  takeaways  talent_pipelines  up-and-comers  women  workforce  workplaces 
october 2019 by jerryking
No Canadians need apply: the worrying trend in arts hiring - The Globe and Mail
KATE TAYLOR
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Aug. 05, 2016

What is worrying is the pattern: It suggests that Canadian cultural institutions are not nurturing their own talents.

If Canadian curators cannot aspire to eventually manage the museums where they work, or Canadian stage directors need never consider running Canada’s festivals, they will not give their institutions the best of themselves. They will either slump into the self-fulfilling prophecy of lower expectations or they will go abroad.

Of course, museum and festival management is, like many a business, an increasingly global game and these things do go through cycles – Anderson was rapidly replaced by one of his Canadian curators, Matthew Teitelbaum, a Torontonian who ran the AGO for 17 years before moving to the helm of the Boston Museum of Fine Arts last year.

But the recent trend suggests that the boards of large Canadian institutions need to band together to discuss how they can better mentor and nurture potential leaders.

Perhaps they should also take a careful look at the assumptions they are making in their hiring processes. These big appointments are often trumpeted with announcements that stress the long, complicated and, most of all, international searches that have been undertaken to find candidates. That may actually be part of the problem: the increasing use of headhunters to fill these jobs. Executive-recruitment agencies charging large fees to conduct searches deep into the United States or over to Europe are unlikely to conclude that the best person for the job is sitting down the hall or across the street from the incumbent.
cultural_institutions  CEOs  hiring  glass_ceilings  Canadian  museums  galleries  arts  festivals  boards_&_directors_&_governance  home_grown  mentoring  institutional_memory  executive_search  succession  leadership  curators 
august 2016 by jerryking
The Disrupters: Making New York’s Cultural Boards More Diverse
JULY 30, 2016 | The New York Times| By JACOB BERNSTEIN.

But Dr. Muhammad, the former director of the Schomburg center, cautioned against seeing Mr. Smith’s entry into New York cultural life as a sign that things will change in a meaningful way.

“White people are going to be wealthier on average, wealthier people are going to be in leadership positions more often, and in those positions they’re likely to be part of a network of people in the same social milieu,” Dr. Muhammad said. “There’ll continue to be people like Robert Smith, who happen to be African-American and do wonderful things, but there’s a giant wealth gap between blacks and whites, and it’s only widened in the wake of the great recession. Is this a sign of a trend that black people will be the heads of boards all over the country? I doubt it.”
Darren_Walker  glass_ceilings  African-Americans  high_net_worth  cultural_institutions  boards_&_directors_&_governance  diversity  New_York_City  museums  lawyers  investment_banking  Wall_Street  Harvard  Robert_Smith  racial_disparities 
august 2016 by jerryking
Breaking into the boys' club of investment banking - The Globe and Mail
BOYD ERMAN
Breaking into the boys' club of investment banking Add to ...
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Published Tuesday, Mar. 11 2014
women  Bay_Street  investment_banking  glass_ceilings  boards_&_directors_&_governance  Boyd_Erman  gender_gap  diversity 
march 2014 by jerryking
Feminists need to challenge themselves, too
Mar. 04 2013 |The Globe and Mail | by NAOMI WOLF.
[dissatisfaction = challenging oneself = self-challenge]
Ms. Sandberg is seeking not just to raise consciousness, but to forge a social movement. She wants her “Lean In” circles – all-women spaces to be supported by corporate workplaces – to teach women negotiation, public speaking and other skills, all merged with upbeat collective support....the opportunity to learn and practise speaking and negotiating skills is hardly inconsequential for women’s advancement... Institutional battles to redress women’s underrepresentation in land ownership, politics, and so on must be coupled with individualized leadership and skills training for women, ideally in an atmosphere of mutual support in which women learn from peers how to achieve and enlarge their own goals.
Sheryl_Sandberg  glass_ceilings  Facebook  social_movements  women  self-scrutiny  mentoring  movingonup  life_skills  workplaces  self-promotion  land_ownership  leadership_development  consciousness-raising  feminism  dissatisfaction  under-representation 
march 2013 by jerryking
Breaking your own glass ceiling - The Globe and Mail
LEAH EICHLER | Columnist profile
From Saturday's Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Sep. 16, 2011
women  glass_ceilings  movingonup  executive_management 
september 2011 by jerryking
Diverse Views on What Women Want in Our Economy — Letters to the Editor - WSJ.com
April 18, 2011 | WSJ | letter to the editor by Pamela J. Tarchinski. Clearly, actor Geena Davis has made great strides in raising awareness of the need for increasing the diversity of female roles in entertainment ("Life Imitates Art: Geena Davis on how gender inequality on TV and in movies has a powerful impact on kids," The Journal Report on Women in the Economy, April 11).

If I were Ms. Davis, I would invite the entertainment world's top 100 women players to dip into their considerable discretionary incomes and back a production company, then hire from the vast pool of existing female talent: writers, producers, directors, actors and crew. Buy up and develop some scripts and pilots. Over the next 10 years, bring to fruition some 20 projects, big and small movies, TV, radio and Internet.
Like the big boys do.
letters_to_the_editor  women  glass_ceilings  pilot_programs  diversity  entertainment_industry  movies  television  writers  actors 
april 2011 by jerryking
The financing gender gap - The Globe and Mail
Mar. 04, 2011|Globe and Mail | Special to MARJO JOHNE
An October 2010 report by the SME Financing Data Initiative – a joint
project by Industry Canada, Statistics Canada and Finance Canada to
gather information on financing for small and medium-sized enterprises –
found that, in 2007, 85 % of female-owned small businesses that applied
for a loan were approved. By comparison, the approval rate for
male-owned small businesses was 96 %. Female-owned businesses also got
less money, receiving an average amount of $118,000, compared with
$284,000 for the companies owned by men. At the same time, female
entrepreneurs had to provide lenders with more documentation – such as
personal financial statements, appraisals of assets and cash flow
projections – than male entrepreneurs, the report found.
gender_gap  entrepreneurship  women  uToronto  glass_ceilings  funding  financial_statements  SMEs  venture_capital 
march 2011 by jerryking
Glass ceilings, sticky floors, and mid-level bottlenecks
September 2010 I Impact . Alison Konrad finds that women and visible minorities are less likely to be promoted than white men
visible_minorities  movingonup  women  workplaces  career_paths  glass_ceilings  bottlenecks  white_men 
october 2010 by jerryking
'We looked around and we saw the ceiling'
Jan. 15, 2007 | Globe & Mail | by ANTHONY REINHART. The
Toronto area is Canada's capital of diversity, with visible minorities
expected to form more than half the population within a decade. Yet new
research suggests visible minorities are feeling less connected to
Canada, and the next generation seems to feel even less of a bond with
the country. "Job opportunities come up based on who you know, based on
networks," Mr. Dhanani says. "It's a self-reinforcing structure right
now, and that's why the visible minorities who break through are
celebrated in their communities."
Toronto  visible_minorities  alienation  social_networking  job_opportunities  Ismailis  self-employment  glass_ceilings  immigrants  ethnic_communities 
october 2009 by jerryking

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