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jerryking : glutes   12

How to do a proper squat
February 10, 2020 | The Globe and Mail | by PAUL LANDINI, SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL
exercise  fitness  glutes  howto  legs  squats  strength_training 
7 weeks ago by jerryking
The Official Pull-Up Checklist (AVOID MISTAKES!) - YouTube
Prerequisite list: Things that can enhance ability to do a pull-up
(1) Strong abdominals. Hang from a bar with absolute stillness. Do more hanging ab exercises.
(2) Strong deadlifts. Stronger you are at "pulling" the better you're going to be on the pull-up.
(3) Strong scapular strength. Need to be strong and stable. Straight arm scapular strength.
(4) Body fat has to be in check. Good strength-to-bodyweight ratio. Get body fat down.

The Set-up
(1) How we grab the bar. Narrow? Shoulder width? Wide grip? Go for slightly wider than shoulder width. Place shoulders in the right position. Gets elbows out in front of the body. Puts stretch on to the lats.
(2) Depth of the grip. Far end of fingers? Deep in the palm? You can do more pull-ups if you grip if you use a hook grip, but you're inviting long-term problems.
(3) Positioning of your legs matters! Keep legs together, pointing toes down towards the ground, and straight out in FRONT of you. Plug the energy leaks (i.e. actively engage your calves, squeeze quads and straighten your knees, squeeze glutes behind you, tighten your abs, ) !!! All these things plug potential places where the force that you're going to generate down to the bar can leak out of. You're whole body is one kinetic chain, with the energy flowing up and down.

The Actual Rep
(1) Look up. Look right at the bar. Get the bar to your chin, preferably to your sternum.
(2) Initiate. Squeeze the bar. Not just through the entire hand. Focus on the ring finger and your pinky finger. Those are the two weakest fingers in your grip. If you can master the weakest fingers, brings the rest of the group along for the ride.
(3) Mindset. Pull the bar down to your body! Attack the bar with your chest. Reach for it with your chest. Open your chest up. Establish thoracic extension. Make exercise easier AND Increase the safety of exercise when it comes to your shoulder.

Caveat: Potential Impact on Shoulder
Do you need to go full out dead hang on every pull up rep. Yes, straighten the elbows on every rep. DO NOT UNPACK YOUR SHOULDERS. Dead hang does NOT mean unpacked shoulders (destabilized shoulders)!!! Don't allow your traps to ride up near your ears. Pull your traps down.....Don't think that getting completely lax at the bottom of the pull-up is a good thing. Get straight at the elbows, keep the tightness there, keep the stability, and then allow that extension through the thoracic spine to still allow for the movement require to execute the pull-up properly, every single time
abdominals  AthleanX  checklists  deadlifts  glutes  mindsets  mistakes  pull-ups  strength_training 
september 2019 by jerryking
Returning to your primal state | The GoodLife Fitness Blog
The BIG five compound movements are squats, deadlifts, bench presses, barbell rows and overhead barbell presses.

* Why are compound movements important?
Compound movements are any exercise that engages two or more different joints, therefore impacting multiple muscles during the same exercise. They improve overall fitness by benefitting the key categories: cardiovascular health, strength and flexibility.

* More burn
Compound movements burn more calories than an isolation exercise. As you build more muscle, your basal metabolic rate (the rate at which you burn calories when at rest) goes up. While doing compound movements, your body expends about five calories of energy to consume one litre of oxygen. That means that an exercise involving more muscle tissue, such as compound movements, requires more oxygen and that helps burn more calories.

* Benefits of each compound movement
SQUAT
Squats activate the muscles all over the upper and lower body. They are a relatively easy movement to learn, but there are varieties and progressions that offer challenges on the way to mastering them.Physical benefits:
Enhance the mobility in the hips and ankles
Challenge your core stabilizers, posterior chain and lower leg
Correct muscle imbalances
Life benefits:
Ease movements such as bending down to lift boxes, working in the garden, trying on shoes at the mall or picking up after a dog during a walk
DEADLIFT
Deadlifts target lats, glutes, hamstrings and core stabilizers, but also work your entire body. They are a great exercise for stabilizing the posterior chain, which is the group of muscles through your whole back.Physical benefits:
Improve overall speed, power and athleticism
Help create a nice shape, especially the butt and legs
Life benefits:
Help when you're doing movements such as picking up heavy boxes or lifting kids
BENCH PRESS
Bench presses are the most effective exercise to gain upper-body strength and mass.Physical benefits:
Increase overall upper-body strength
Improve cardiovascular function
Life benefits:
Anything that requires pushing, whether that's pushing a stroller or a lawnmower or attempting power-sled exercises in the gym
BARBELL ROW
This is one of the key exercises that carries over to the other big lifts. If you do it well, you'll improve all the other compound movements.Physical benefits:
Strengthens the back
Reinforces proper hip function
Life benefits:
Improves posture
Helps undo some of the damage of sitting every day
OVERHEAD BARBELL PRESS
While the overhead barbell press strengthens the upper body, particularly shoulder muscles, it also gives your stabilizers a workout as you maintain proper form.Physical benefits:
Strengthens the rotator cuff, which helps people who are internally rotated
Reduces the risk of shoulder injuries
Life benefits:
Eases the impact of constantly looking down at cellphones
Improves posture
You can start off with bodyweight, rather than weights..... air squat can still deliver a workout. You can also just use the bar without weights. .....Perfecting the movements helps ward off injury when you do load on some weight. Once you’re comfortable with the movements, put together a periodized plan (ask a GoodLife professional about a 5x5 program to get you started). You’ll soon see and feel the benefits of more strength, increased energy, better posture and higher fat burn.
chest  deadlifts  Goodlife  metabolic_rate  strength_training  squats  fitness  glutes  military_press  compound_movements  functional_strength  core_stability 
august 2019 by jerryking
The 6 Best Lifts for NEW Muscle Growth (GUARANTEED!) - YouTube
(1) Deadlifts >>> (a) chest-supported row (T-Bar row); (b) Reverse dumbbell lunge or forward dumbbell lunge. Teaches you how to push hard through that forward leg to get all momentum of your body back up to a standing position. How to push with great force through your legs, one at a time, into the ground. Then go back to deadlifting with both feet.

(2) Squats >>> (value of the glutes when it comes to performing the squat. Don't half rep it. Activate the glutes to help with the bottom of the lift, but you have to get deep enough. A variation of the glute hamstring raise. Initiate the contraction by squeezing your butt cheeks together. Hip flextion.

(3) Overhead Press. Z press. Sit down on the ground, and overhead press from that position.

(4) Weighted Pull-ups. Work on stability of the shoulder blade.
AthleanX  breakthroughs  deadlifts  fitness  glutes  military_press  pull-ups  squats  strength_training 
may 2019 by jerryking
A Guide to Your Knees - Well Guides - The New York Times
By Dr. Jordan Metzl

Never had knee pain? Excellent. Let’s keep it that way. And while not all knee problems are preventable, you can prevent many issues and also improve knee function with strength and flexibility training.

With increased muscular strength and flexibility surrounding your knees, the better they bear their load. Muscles are shock absorbers; the stronger they are, the better they can offload the hips and knees and the better your joints will feel — no matter your age.

STRENGTH
Lower extremity strength training includes anything that builds muscle around the hips and knees. Stationary biking is the easiest way to start and has the added benefit of aiding knee and hip mobility. Biking can be done several times per week on a stationary or recumbent bike; we recommend biking for 20 to 30 minutes per session.

Functional strength exercises are designed to strengthen multiple muscle groups simultaneously. Unlike a single muscle exercise such as a bicep curl, functional strength exercises like as a push-up, strengthen all of the muscles in a body area simultaneously. When you move normally, muscles work together, so it makes more sense to exercise them together as well........
Bodyweight Split Squat
Single Leg Hip Raise
Single Leg Toe Touch

FLEXIBILITY
As sore knees stiffen, the muscles around the knees tighten as well. This soft tissue tightening often amplifies knee pain. A foam roller is a terrific, low-cost option that can be used at home to improve flexibility and reduce pain through a process known as myofascial release.

HOW TO ROLL YOUR KNEE
The Hamstrings Roll

Place a foam roller under your right knee, with your leg straight. Cross your left leg over your right ankle. Please your hands flat on the floor behind you.
Roll your body forward until the roller reaches your glutes. Then roll back and forth over the roller.
Repeat with the other side.
Note: You can also do this with both legs on the roller.

Glutes Roll

Sit on a foam roller with it positioned on the back of your right thigh, just below your glutes. Cross your right leg over the front of your left thigh. Put your hands behind you for support.
Roll your body forward until the roller reaches your lower back. Then roll back and forth.
Repeat on the other side.
exercise  fitness  functional_strength  injuries  primers  knees  mens'_health  legs  glutes  injury_prevention 
march 2019 by jerryking
Adopt a movement-based approach for optimized workouts - The Globe and Mail
MAY 25, 2017 | SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL
PUBLISHED | PAUL LANDINI

the four most common movement patterns: 1. pushing (vertical and horizontal), 2. pulling (vertical and horizontal), 3. squatting (knee-dominant) and 4. hinging (hip-dominant). Master these movements and you'll be able to execute just about any exercise that comes your way.

(1) Pushing

Main muscles: Pectorals (chest), deltoids (shoulders), triceps (back of arms).

Best exercises: Push-ups; landmine press; one-arm kettlebell press.
(2) Pulling
Main muscles: Latissimus dorsi (mid back), rhomboids (upper back), biceps (front of arms).

Best exercises: Pull-ups; inverted row; face pull

(3) Squatting

Main muscles: Quads (front of legs), glutes (butt), hamstrings (back of legs).

Best exercises: Goblet squat; split squat; reverse lunge.

(4) Hinging

Main muscles: Hamstrings, glutes, spinal erectors (low back).

Best exercises: Deadlift; Romanian deadlift; kettlebell swing
back_exercises  calisthenics  compound_movements  deadlifts  exercise  face-pulls  fitness  functional_strength  glutes  movement-based  pull-ups  push-ups  shoulder_exercises  squats  strength_training 
april 2018 by jerryking
Strengthen your glutes for better balance and less pain
November 1, 2017 | The Globe and Mail | KATHLEEN TROTTER.

Weak or inactive glutes – which are all too common – can contribute to lower back, hip, knee and ankle pain, not to mention reduced daily function and decreased endurance, strength and power.

The causes include excessive sitting (tight hip flexors), habituated improper loading patterns (over-recruitment of quads and lower back) and motor-control deficits. Even those who perform exercises that theoretically strengthen the glutes tend to unknowingly recruit other muscles.

How weak glutes can lead to injuries

Walking, jogging and running require hip extension – i.e., the leg moving backward to propel the body forward. The gluteus maximus is responsible for this motion. When you lack adequate hip extension, the body compensates, often by extending through the lower back or tilting the pelvis. These compensations stress the lower back, contributing to degenerative changes in the spine, muscle pain and an inefficient gait, and the pelvic tilt can cause the hamstrings to become over-lengthened and thus easily strained.

Pelvis stability impacts the knee. The femur makes up half the knee joint. The femur is controlled by pelvis muscles (primarily glutes). Thus, hip control is knee control. One common result of weak glutes is knee pain from an internally rotated femur that torques the knee.

How to activate and strengthen your glutes

1. Stretch your hip flexors, especially if you have a fairly sedentary lifestyle, which most of us do.

Sitting shortens hip flexors. Tight hip flexors inhibit the glutes. The bum can't fully engage when hip flexors are tight.

Lunge stretch: Step your left leg forward into a shallow lunge, both feet facing forward. Tuck your pelvis – your right hip bones should move toward your ribs. Feel a stretch up the front of your right thigh. Hold for 30 seconds or more. Switch sides.

2. "Activate" so you can integrate. Activation exercises "turn on" muscles that are not firing appropriately.

Isometric hip extensions: Tie a resistance band around your thighs. Lie on your right side, head supported, bottom leg bent, top leg straight and top hip long. Lift the top leg up and back in space slightly. Hold for 10 seconds. Initiate the motion from your bum. Release. Repeat for 10 reps. No band? Do the exercise without the band but hold for 30 seconds, working up to 60 seconds.

Band squats: Stand with a band tied around your thighs, feet slightly wider than shoulder width. Use the hip strategy outlined below to sit backward and imagine your sit bones widening as you squat. Hold for 10 seconds, engaging your bum to meet the tension of the band. Repeat 10 times. No band? Do body-weight squat holds for 20 seconds each.

The long-term goal is to integrate the now-active muscle into functional movement patterns such as squats. This way, motions that should theoretically work the glutes will actually work them. Do activation exercises daily until your bum is able to engage. Once activated, these exercises work well as part of a warm-up before training your lower body.

Utilize a "hip strategy" when squatting, lunging, performing step-ups, etc.

Hip strategy: This biases the glutes. To perform, lean up to 45 degrees forward, have a proportionally greater bend at the hip than the knee and when possible load the exercise from the back versus the front.

Knee strategy: This biases the quads. To perform, have an erect torso (shoulders over hips) and a proportionally larger bend at the knee versus the hip.

One strategy is not "good" and the other "bad." What you use depends on your goal. If you require stronger thighs, use the knee strategy. To get your glutes to join the party, use the hip strategy. Once your glutes are active, alternate strategies week to week.

Be mindful

The greatest predictor of future injury is previous injury. If you've had ankle, knee, hip or back injuries, don't wait for pain – pre-emptively train your glutes. Consider having an expert assess your overall movement mechanics. The body is a series of dominoes – every muscle and joint affect the muscles and joints above and below. To improve function and decrease rates of injury, work to understand your kinetic chain as a whole.

The goal of this program is to make unconsciously "active glutes" a new norm. I want your bum to work appropriately when you run, walk, sit or stand without you consciously deciding to use it. To make this a reality, purposeful thought – at least initially – is required. Turn your music off and stop chatting. Consider putting a hand on the muscle being worked. The brain responds well to tactile feedback. Concentrate on form and the muscles you're attempting to work.
endurance  exercise  fitness  glutes  squats  stretching  strength_training 
november 2017 by jerryking

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