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jerryking : goals   15

How to step back and rethink your career goals
SEPTEMBER 17, 2019 | Financial Times | by Elizabeth Uviebinene.

Mobile apps: Wunderlist and Trello.
Podcasts on the “back to life” mindset: How to Fail with Elizabeth Day, Better Life Lab and Without Fail
Newsletters: The Roundup by Otegha Uwagba

Autumn now brings a sense of trepidation — it can be an unsettling time for those who are starting new opportunities and a source of anxiety for those who feel stuck in a rut while others move on......I look at autumn a little differently, seeing it as a time to reset and an opportunity to make small changes to my routine without the cynicism that is attached to new year’s resolutions...... a little refresh now can go a long way...... it’s more about making time to check in with them, to realign and reprioritize.......The first step is to check in on your long-term goals, the ones you want to achieve in a few years. Is your current trajectory aligning with those goals? If not, why not? What can you implement today to get you back on track?....write down what you’ve achieved this year and positioning it within the overall business objectives that show your individual impact......journal when it comes to both long-term and weekly career planning. Spending time writing down objectives and reflecting on how best to get there in the coming weeks and months can provide a sense of control......prioritizing is essential to maintaining a healthy work and life balance. Journal five goals for the next four months and then place them in priority order, cross off the bottom three, to leave the two most important ones. That's where to focus one's time and energy......."Find your tribe”. A sense of community is key to battling the loneliness that this time of year can bring. This could be done online by signing up to a newsletter, or via community groups and live events....Attend conferences.....use this time of year to consider making a career change, aiming for the next promotion or starting a side project, ....reflect, plot and plan on how best to get there. Sneaking small changes into our working life can make all the difference.
autumn  conferences  goals  howto  journaling  long-term  Managing_Your_Career  mindsets  mobile_applications  networking  podcasts  priorities  reflections  résumés  self-organization  sense_of_control  tribes  work_life_balance 
september 2019 by jerryking
Beware these management myths
November 2, 2018 | The Globe and Mail HARVEY SCHACHTER
goals  Harvey_Schachter  myths 
november 2018 by jerryking
Eight steps to making better decisions as a manager - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, May 08, 2016

Write down the key facts that need to be considered. Too often we jump into decisions and ignore the obvious.

Write down five pre-existing goals or priorities that will be affected by the decision.

Write down realistic alternatives – at least three, but ideally four or more.

Write down what’s missing. Information used to be scarce. Now it’s so abundant it can distract us from checking what’s missing (jk: i.e. the commoditization of information)

Write down the impact your decision will have one year in the future. By thinking a year out, you are separating yourself from the immediate moment, lessening emotions. [Reminiscent of Suzy Welch’s 10-10-10 rule. When you’re about to make a decision, ask yourself how you will feel about it 10 minutes from now? 10 months from now? and 10 years from now? People are overly biased by the immediate pain of some choice, but they can put the short-term pain in long-term perspective by asking these questions].

Involve at least two more people in the decision but no more than six additional team members. This ensures less bias, more perspectives, and since more people contributed to the decision, increased buy-in when implementing it.

Write down what was decided, as well as why and how much the team supports the decision.

Schedule a follow-up in one to two months.
Harvey_Schachter  decision_making  goals  buy-in  options  unknowns  following_up  note_taking  dissension  perspectives  biases  information_gaps  long-term  dispassion  alternatives  think_threes  unsentimental  Suzy_Welch  commoditization_of_information  process-orientation 
may 2016 by jerryking
What World Cup athletes can teach us about bouncing back - The Globe and Mail
Jul. 14 2014 | G&M | DANE JENSEN.

The resilience tool-kit: Four tips to improve mental fitness

Through our work with more than 70 Olympic medalists and thousands of managers, we have identified four mental fitness tools – drawn from sport psychology – that are critically important to resilience, and applicable in any environment:

1. Perspective – Consciously choose a “Three C” perspective.

Research has identified that individuals who thrive under pressure choose to view setbacks with a sense of challenge (“this is a test”), focus on what they can control (“time to work on my dribbling”), and commit to making it happen. ... The key is to notice the perspective you are taking and, if it doesn’t focus on what you want, change it.

2. Energy management – Don’t waste the energy inherent in disappointment.

What are you going to do with that energy? How will you put it to use so that you never feel like this again?

3. Imagery – “Change the film” and look forward.

Elite athletes choose to have short memories. They consciously work to “change the film” in their head and focus on what they want rather than what they don’t want.

4. Focus – Create and hold a compelling vision of the future.

Having one's own version of a "podium moment" is important – achievement plays a major role for all of us. Equally important is considering what the goals are that hold meaning for you, and how your day-to-day actions are connected to these goals.
inspiration  bouncing_back  resilience  FIFA  soccer  affirmations  lessons_learned  athletes_&_athletics  sports  sport_psychology  personal_energy  goals  focus  disappointment 
september 2014 by jerryking
There Are Many Things That Are Missing in Ferguson — Letters to the Editor - WSJ
Aug. 21, 2014 | WSJ | Letter to the editor by Richard Klitzberg
Joseph Epstein's poignant comments in "What's Missing in Ferguson, Mo." (op-ed, Aug. 13) compare and contrast today's absence of black leadership with the '50s and '60s when great and historic black leaders rose to give the civil rights era its direction. The real question from Mr. Epstein should not concern riots in Missouri or what and how much blacks have been given by government, or what their current leaders have accomplished for them, but why they need "leaders" in the first place. ...The black community doesn't need today's leaders who are completely self-absorbed. It needs values and standards, goals and objectives—all of which are within their personal control. And they need to aim high. Doing that, even if one doesn't quite make it, leaves one a long way above where he was.
Ferguson  Michael_Brown  leadership  leaders  African-Americans  ethnic_communities  personal_control  self-absorbed  values  standards  goals  objectives  '60s  '50s  civil_rights 
august 2014 by jerryking
The Best Advice I Ever Received: Work Harder | LinkedIn
March 04, 2014 | LinkedIn | Kevin Scott.

To me, "work harder" was a stark reminder every week to clearly understand what it was that I was trying to accomplish, and to make sure that I was objectively prioritizing the effort it was going to take to accomplish those goals.

What about work-life balance? There's a time and place for that. And there's a time and place where it isn't going to help you accomplish your objectives. My wife and I met in graduate school, and neither of us understood the notion until we were out of academia and through the first several years of our careers.

What about enjoying the journey? Not that I haven't enjoyed my journey, but I for one want my kids to recall what good their Dad managed to do in his finite time on Earth, not how much he enjoyed his journey. So, when it's either-or, and sometimes it is, I do what's necessary to accomplish my objectives even if I'm not walking around full of journey-induced joy.
work_life_balance  advice  engineering  objectives  hard_work  goals  joyless  parenting  personal_accomplishments 
march 2014 by jerryking
Bill Gates on the Importance of Measurement - WSJ.com
January 25, 2013 | WSJ | by Bill Gates.
(Charles Waud & WaudWare)
From the fight against polio to fixing education, what's missing is often good measurement and a commitment to follow the data. We can do better. We have the tools at hand.

Without feedback from precise measurement...invention is "doomed to be rare and erratic." With it, invention becomes "commonplace."
An innovation—whether it's a new vaccine or an improved seed—can't have an impact unless it reaches the people who will benefit from it. We need innovations in measurement to find new, effective ways to deliver those tools and services to the clinics, family farms and classrooms that need them....As budgets tighten for governments and foundations world-wide, we all need to take the lesson of the steam engine to heart and adapt it to solving the world's biggest problems...information [needs to] go into a system—part paper-based and part computerized—that helps decision makers see where things are working and to take action in places where they aren't....the most critical change we can make in U.S. K–12 education, with America lagging countries in Asia and Northern Europe when it comes to turning out top students, is to create teacher-feedback systems that are properly funded, high quality and trusted by teachers....The process I have described—setting clear goals, choosing an approach, measuring results, and then using those measurements to continually refine our approach—helps us to deliver tools and services to everybody who will benefit, be they students in the U.S. or mothers in Africa.
billgates  metrics  problem_solving  problems  dashboards  innovation  instrumentation_monitoring  data  tools  Ethiopia  goal-setting  goals  feedback  measurements  assessments_&_evaluations 
january 2013 by jerryking
Surprised by Opportunity - WSJ.com
NOVEMBER 14, 2007 | WSJ | By WILLIAM EASTERLY.

Set big goals. Do whatever it takes to reach them. These muscular sentences form the core of commencement addresses, business-advice books, political movements and even the United Nations approach to global poverty. In "Strategic Intuition," a concise and entertaining treatise on human achievement, William Duggan says that such pronouncements are not only banal but wrong.[Duggan is therefore the perfect counterpoint to Jim Collins]

Mr. Duggan, who teaches strategy at Columbia Business School, argues that the commonplace formula has it backward. Instead of setting goals first, he says, it is better to watch for opportunities with large payoffs at low costs and only then set your goals. That is what innovators throughout history have done, as Mr. Duggan shows in a deliriously fast-paced tour of history.
[photo]

Napoleon is Mr. Duggan's canonical example -- his strategic genius was not to storm a pre-fixed position on the battlefield (the traditional approach to military strategy at the time) but to attack any old position that came along where his army was at its strongest and the enemy's at its weakest. Similarly, in the battle for civil rights, Martin Luther King Jr. seized on the Montgomery bus boycott in 1955 to shift the NAACP's strategy away from filing lawsuits and toward organizing nonviolent civil disobedience.
audacity  books  book_reviews  civil_disobedience  counterintuitive  flexibility  goal-setting  goals  hard_goals  innovators  intuition  Jim_Collins  kairos  large_payoffs  MLK  NAACP  Napoleon  observations  offensive_tactics  opportunism  personal_payoffs  strategy  William_Duggan  William_Easterly 
november 2011 by jerryking
7 Simple Steps to Extreme Personal Productivity
June 28, 2011 | BNET | By Jeff Haden
(1) Tell everyone your plan...Peer pressure can be a great
motivator. Use it.
(2) Decide how long you will work. Don’t plan based on, “I’ll work
as long as I can,” Set a concrete target. Commit to working X hrs.
(3) Start really early. Have you ever taken a long car trip and left
really early in the morning? Like at 3 a.m.? Those first few hours on
the road fly by because you’ve stepped outside your norm. The same
trick works with accomplishing a major goal.
(4) Withhold the fun, at least for a while... Delayed gratification
is always better gratification.
(5) Recharge early. Plan to eat or snack a little earlier than
normal.
(6) Take productive breaks, not rest breaks. Momentum is everything.
Don’t take a walk, or watch a little TV, or goof around on the
Internet.
(7) Don’t quit until you’re done — even if finishing takes longer
than expected. Stopping short is habit-forming.
Jeff_Haden  productivity  gtd  rules_of_the_game  goals  Managing_Your_Career  delayed_gratification  slack_time  peer_pressure  affirmations  early_risers 
june 2011 by jerryking
The Urge To React
Richards, Carl
The New York Times
03-19-2011

It's hard to stick to a plan when everything is screaming at you to
abandon ship. I'm also not saying that the market will stop going down.
But if you have carefully considered your investment decisions in the
context of your life and goals, with a clear understanding of the risks
you take when you invest in the stock market (no excuses here since we
just lived through the best example of risk in decades), then now is the
time to stick to the plan.
financial_planning  crisis_management  reflections  personal_finance  goals  values  crisis  self-discipline 
march 2011 by jerryking
What to do if Canada wins a seat at the Security Council table -
Sep. 25, 2010 | The Globe & Mail | Paul
Heinbecker.....First and foremost, we need to take ourselves seriously
again, to pursue an active foreign policy informed by facts and
compassion, rather than by ideology and partisan calculation. To get
back in the game at the UN, we should tear a page from the British
playbook, and make ourselves indispensable, or at least so valuable that
others seek our help. .....Fifth, at the same time, we should continue
to oppose the creation of new permanent seats, with or without
accompanying vetoes. Democratic accountability requires that
seat-holders face their electorates from time to time. Further, standing
for election forces candidates to take an interest in the concerns of
their electors.
Canada  UN  goals  indispensable  rule_of_law  playbooks 
september 2010 by jerryking
The Simple Dollar » The Five Ps: Breaking Down Big Dreams Into Little Steps
April 29, 2008 | The Simple Dollar | Written by Trent Hamm

Passion. Find it and know it.
Practice. Break your passion down into pieces and deliberately work on the elements.
Persistence. Practice as much as you can on an extremely regular basis, like clockwork.
Patience. Don’t expect to be great in a day, a month, or even a year.
Participation. Find new ways to get involved and share what you know.

Today, my friend, is a great day to get started.
advice  break_down  clockwork  goals  habits  inspiration  participation  passions  patience  persistence  practice  productivity  writing 
october 2009 by jerryking

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