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jerryking : goodwill   9

Inside the brutal transformation of Tim Hortons - The Globe and Mail
MARINA STRAUSS
THE GLOBE AND MAIL
LAST UPDATED: WEDNESDAY, FEB. 22, 2017

Since taking over the iconic chain in 2014, its new Brazilian owner, 3G Capital, has purged head office, slashed costs and squeezed suppliers. Shareholders are happy, but is 3G tearing the heart out of Timmy’s?.....3G is regarded as ultra-disciplined owners who are sticking to the same playbook they have followed at companies including Burger King, Anheuser-Busch, Kraft Foods and Heinz: massive layoffs, replacing legacy managers with hungry youngsters and, above all, a fanatical devotion to financial benchmarks and cost-cutting. (It remains to be seen whether this will also be the approach for RBI’s latest acquisition, Popeyes Louisiana Kitchen.)....Will 3G's analytics-driven overhaul of Tim Hortons—using the same template the private equity firm’s founders have deployed at railroads, brewers and food makers—succeed in the long run, or is it in danger of cutting the heart out of a Canadian icon? ......Suppliers are also feeling the squeeze. From the get-go, RBI made it clear it would be reviewing vendor relationships. And the company pushed for better terms, including extensions on bill payments to as much as 120 days from 30 days or less. Maple Leaf Foods, a major partner that supplied meat to Tim Hortons, declined to accept the new terms, and walked away....
Former employees also say RBI has cut back on product research and development spending at Tim Hortons, offloading some of that work to suppliers. That’s not uncommon in the fast-food world, but it can be risky. “Suppliers can do a great job with innovating and R&D, but you’re limited to what the supplier is trying to develop,” ......3G has never encountered a brand quite like Tim Hortons. It isn’t just another coffee company. It is a Canadian destination, an integral part of many Canadians’ day and a brand that defines us, to some degree, around the world.......“The risk, in looking at Tim Hortons through the lens of efficiency alone, is to miss the greatest value of the asset, and that is the Tim’s brand and its deep connection to the fabric of the country,” says Joe Jackman, founder of strategic retail consultant Jackman Reinvents, whose clients have included Old Navy, Hertz, Rexall and FreshCo. “You can’t cost-cut your way to retail nirvana.”
3G_Capital  brands  Canadiana  coffee  community_support  cost-cutting  cultural_touchpoints  data_driven  downsizing  efficiencies  fast-food  franchising  goodwill  head_offices  iconic  JWT  layoffs  Maple_Leaf_Foods  Marina_Strauss  organizational_culture  playbooks  private_equity  R&D  RBI  restructurings  staying_hungry  supply_chains  supply_chain_squeeze  Tim_Hortons  transformational  walking_away 
february 2017 by jerryking
How to garner goodwill and respect | Financial Post
April 2, 2012 Financial Post | Rick Spence.

here are seven ways I believe you can woo your audience:

1. Recognize this opportunity is about understanding what the audience wants to hear. Always ask the meeting organizers about their expectations, and strive to meet them.
2. Be yourself.
3. Explain clearly and concisely what you do. ...Tell your story as simply as possible — who buys your products, and what problems do you solve for them?
4. Look for ways to tell your story visually. Use PowerPoint to show us your premises, your products and your customers. Don’t overdo it; people want to hear from you, not sit through a canned presentation.
5. Brag, but subtly.
6. Be memorable. At least, don’t be boring. Do something unexpected. Bring an unlikely prop, share a secret, describe how your company changed people’s lives, or ask the audience to take action. Leave people with one compelling idea or vision they’ll be talking about long after you sit down.
7. Practise, practise. Read your presentation repeatedly until you are so familiar with it you don’t need your notes.

If you finish early, ask for questions from the floor. Prepare an initial question or two of your own, in case your audience is shy (otherwise, this could be longest minute of your life). You might say, “What I’d be asking me right now is this — ” Follow it with a question that allows you to repeat your theme, with some new “inside” information that enhances it.

Be spontaneous, but never unprepared.
authenticity  clarity  Communicating_&_Connecting  concision  conferences  goodwill  know_your_audience  preparation  public_speaking  readiness  respect  RetailLoco_2017  Rick_Spence  speeches  spontaneity  storytelling  unprepared  visual_culture 
january 2017 by jerryking
Hidden gems
Apr 12th 2014 | The Economist | Schumpeter.

Reviving old brands sometimes makes more sense than creating new ones.

companies often discard brands that contain plenty of what marketers call “equity”. In plain English, ones that people still remember fondly. Healthy brands can be sacrificed on the altars of corporate takeovers and restructurings....The second reason is that reviving an old brand often beats spending months and millions on creating a new one, with a lower risk of failure. If something has worked before there is a good chance that it will work again. Old brands come with ready-made logos, slogans, jingles and memories.
brand_equity  brands  branding  orphan_brands  rejuvenation  goodwill  symbolism  jingles  logos  slogans  memories  culling 
april 2014 by jerryking
What’s an Idea Worth? - NYTimes.com
By ADAM DAVIDSON
Published: July 29, 2013 (think about this for WaudWare)

Companies like G.E., Nike and Apple learned early on that the real money was in the creative ideas that can transform simple physical products far beyond their generic or commodity value....we have no idea how to measure the financial value of ideas and the people who come up with them.
fees_&_commissions  invoicing  intangibles  billing  transformational  GE  Nike  Apple  fees  goodwill  professional_service_firms  branding  metrics  time-management  productivity  knowledge_economy  creativity  pricing  value_creation  ideas 
august 2013 by jerryking
The 9 Characteristics Of A Strong Brand:
October 26, 2008 | Branding Strategy Insider| Posted by Martin Roll.
1. A brand drives shareholder value
2. The brand is led by the boardroom and managed by brand marketers with an active buy-in from all stakeholders
3. The brand is a fully integrated part of the entire organisation aligned around multiple touch points
4. The brand can be valued in financial terms and must reside on the asset side of the balance sheet
5. The brand can used as collateral for financial loans and can be bought and sold as an asset
6. Customers are willing to pay a substantial and consistent price premium for the brand versus a competing product and service
7. Customers associate themselves strongly with the brand, its attributes, values and personality, and they fully buy into the concept which is often characterized by a very emotional and intangible relationship (higher customer loyalty)
8. Customers are loyal to the brand and would actively seek it and buy it despite several other reasonable and often cheaper options available (higher customer retention rate)
9. A brand is a trademark and marquee (logo, shape, colour etc) which is fiercely and pro-actively protected by the company and its legal advisors
brand_purpose  brands  branding  ksfs  large_companies  Fortune_500  emotional_connections  goodwill  customer_loyalty  brand_equity  boards_&_directors_&_governance  logos  trademarks  intangibles  shareholder_value  assets  collateral 
november 2012 by jerryking
Tapping Customers' Egos to Build a Web Presence - WSJ.com
FEBRUARY 9, 2011 By MIKE MICHALOWICZ Two words: a prospect's
first and last name. Feature these in a positive light and that's all
you need to generate genuine interest in your company. Best of all, when
you use the crowdsourcing method, it's free—free user-driven content,
free publicity for your business and free "good will" for your brand.
jck  crowdsourcing  websites  running_a_business  goodwill  user_generated  hubris 
march 2011 by jerryking
How to Build a Strong Brand in a Weak Economy
February 17, 2009 | ezine articles | by Rachel Y. Daniel is
the CEO of Synergy Marketing Strategy & Research, Inc.
Here are a few inexpensive, yet powerful, methods to produce significant
rewards:
1) Social networking media. 2) Corporate Social Responsibility
Initiatives. 3) Consumer Advisory Boards. Here are three critical
actions to establishing a strong brand in a weak economy: 1) Exude
Integrity. 2) Showcase Organizational Capabilities. 3) Emanate Goodwill.
branding  economic_downturn  integrity  inexpensive  organizational_capacity  goodwill  CSR  social_media  brands  weak_economy 
june 2010 by jerryking

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