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The Meadoway: 16 km stretch of urban park will connect downtown to Scarborough | CBC News
Posted: Apr 11, 2018 | CBC News | by Ramna Shahzad.

The park will connect 4 ravines, 15 parks and 34 neighbourhoods.

A 16-kilometre long stretch of land slated to be transformed into a large urban park called The Meadoway is "a bold vision," Mayor John Tory said on Wednesday.

The park, which will stretch north from the Don River Ravine in downtown Toronto all the way to Rouge National Urban Park in Scarborough, will allow pedestrians and cyclists to travel the entire length without ever leaving the park. .......The city is working with the Toronto and Region Conservation Authority (TRCA) and the W. Garfield Weston Foundation to transform a barren power corridor into the green space over the next seven years.

The entire project is expected to cost around $85 million. The W. Garfield Weston Foundation has pledged a total of $25 million to support it over the coming months.

"[The park] serves as another example of what can be accomplished when we work together with public, private and philanthropic partners,"
bicycles  cycling  Don_River  habitats  landscapes  linearity  Meadoway  neighbourhoods  outdoors  parks  philanthropy  public_spaces  ravines  Rouge_Park  Scarborough  Toronto  TRCA  urban  wilderness  green_spaces 
july 2019 by jerryking
The Scarborough Bluffs are rarely seen — but there’s a plan to change that - The Globe and Mail
MARCUS GEE
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, May 13, 2016

[ M. Jane Fairburn in her 2013 book Along the Shore, a history of Toronto's waterfront]

Conservation officials hope to change all that, making the Bluffs safer and easier to visit. They want to shore up dangerous bits, put in more trails and create habitat for wild animals and fish. A study is already under way, with a first set of options to be presented to the public next month.

It is an exciting project, a once-in-a-century chance to open up the whole of the Scarborough shore to a broader public. It is also a delicate one. Officials face the challenge of giving safe access to the Bluffs without destroying the wild quality that lend them their magic. Some people want them left alone altogether. Others want to see a continuous shoreline trail as you might have in an urban waterfront.
Toronto  Marcus_Gee  Scarborough  history  parks  waterfronts  landmarks  landscapes  ravines  conservation  habitats  wilderness  books  TRCA 
may 2016 by jerryking
Taylor Creek Park: A ribbon of otherness - The Globe and Mail
MASSIMO COMMANDUCCI
Globe and Mail Update
Published Thursday, Dec. 23, 2010

Running from Dawes Road in the east, just north of Danforth Avenue, to the Don River in the west, the park is an almost-four-kilometre-long stretch of semi-wilderness, part of the disconnected ravine system in the city's east end. Take away a golf course here, a roadway there, and the park would easily link Scarborough's Warden Woods and E.T. Seton Park on the other side of the Don Valley Parkway.

Like those two ravines, Taylor Creek Park follows the path of a river. Taylor-Massey Creek, named after two prominent Toronto families, starts near Highway 401 and runs south along an undignified, concrete-lined course through Scarborough, picking up all kinds of debris and pollutants along the way. But at least it resembles a creek again by the time it reaches the park, bending this way and that, creating pools and eddies for the resident crawfish and ducks.

Unlike a traditional city green space such as High Park, with its formal borders, restaurant, concrete-lined pond and even a zoo, Taylor Creek Park is a wonderfully vague, meandering affair. In some places, homes and buildings loom directly above the ravine - it's often hard to know where the park ends and private property begins; in others, the greenery stretches north and south for hundreds of metres, elbowing its way through the city.

The marshes that line both sides of the creek are stuffed with cattails and willow trees and are home to dragonflies and red-winged blackbirds that complain loudly when joggers or cyclists get too close to their nests. In the eighties, many of the marshes were drained to control mosquitoes and to prevent the flooding of picnic areas and the park's sole paved path; fortunately, the city parks department now follows a policy of naturalization - a combination of habitat restoration and benign neglect - and the wetlands are back.
Don_River  green_spaces  habitats  parks  rivers  ravines  Toronto  wetlands  wilderness 
july 2011 by jerryking

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