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Bracken Bower Prize 2019: excerpts from finalists’ proposals | Financial Times
YESTERDAYPrint this page
Edited excerpts from the book proposals of the three finalists for the 2019 Bracken Bower Prize, backed by the Financial Times and McKinsey.
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
(1)The Sinolarity
China’s quest to wire the world and win the future
By Jonathan Hillman

(2) Hacking Social Impact
How to change systems to tackle urgent problems
By Paulo Savaget

(3) InfoSec
Inside the world’s most secure organisations
By Ernesto Zaldivar
books  book_reviews  China  cyberattacks  cyberintrusions  cyber-security  FT  hacks  hackers  Huawei  McKinsey  networks  passwords  phishing  prizes  security_consciousness  teams 
8 weeks ago by jerryking
Nortel hacking went on for years
FEBRUARY 14, 2012 | FT Alphaville | By Joseph Cotterill.
Chinese hackers had undetected access to sensitive Nortel data for almost a decade from 2000, the WSJ reports. The extent to which Nortel, the once-mighty telecoms giant, was compromised shows the lack of corporate defences against hacking. Nortel didn’t disclose its hacking problem to buyers of its assets. Spy software was so deeply embedded in Nortel computers that investigators failed to spot its existence for years. The SEC last year began pushing companies to classify serious cyber attacks on their infrastructure as “material risks” that may require financial disclosure.
China  Chinese  cyberattacks  cyber_security  cyberintrusions  disclosure  hackers  Nortel  regulators  risks  SEC 
march 2019 by jerryking
U.S. Weaponizes Its Criminal Courts in Fight Against China and Huawei
Jan. 17, 2019 | WSJ | By Chuin-Wei Yap.

The federal pursuit of theft charges adds pressure on Chinese tech giant Huawei Technologies Co. by further involving the criminal-justice system in the fight against China’s alleged encroachment on intellectual property. It is the second case in four months where federal prosecutors have built criminal allegations on civil litigation, risking uncertain outcomes as a verdict isn’t guaranteed.........The Trump administration wants to use indictments, along with export controls and other policy tools, as part of an arsenal to counter Chinese theft of trade and technology secrets, which U.S. officials increasingly view as part of national security.....That has meant a more aggressive effort to convert corporate squabbles into criminal charges.....the entry of federal prosecutors ratchets up global attention and the stakes in what had until then been less noticed civil filings.....High-profile prosecutions are part of a range of weapons the U.S. can call on to shape global perceptions of China’s state-corporate behavior, as well as China’s perception of how its options might be dwindling.....Other tools include sanctioning exports and redefining “emerging technologies” as a national security concern.....“The U.S. will pursue critical Chinese companies in any form possible,” ...... “The U.S. is aiming at creating a kind of sinking feeling for China. That is, no matter what China does, there will still be new angles for the U.S. to contain it.”.....an advantage of using the justice system is that it makes it difficult for China to feign ignorance when faced with a barrage of detailed allegations and corroboration.
China  criminal_justice  Department_of_Justice  hackers  Huawei  intellectual_property  legal_strategies  policy_tools  theft  trade_secrets  security_&_intelligence 
january 2019 by jerryking
Computer vision: how Israel’s secret soldiers drive its tech success
November 20, 2018 | Financial Times | Mehul Srivastava in Tel Aviv.
.... those experiences that have helped such a tiny country become a leader in one of the most promising frontiers in the technology world: computer vision. Despite the unwieldy name it is an area that has come of age in the past few years, covering applications across dozens of industries that have one thing in common: the need for computers to figure out what their cameras are seeing, and for those computers to tell them what to do next.........Computer vision has become the connecting thread between some of Israel’s most valuable and promising tech companies. And unlike Israel’s traditional strengths— cyber security and mapping — computer vision slides into a broad range of different civilian industries, spawning companies in agriculture, medicine, sports, self-driving cars, the diamond industry and even shopping. 

In Israel, this lucrative field has benefited from a large pool of engineers and entrepreneurs trained for that very task in an elite, little-known group in the military — Unit 9900 — where they fine-tuned computer algorithms to digest millions of surveillance photos and sift out actionable intelligence. .........The full name for Unit 9900 — the Terrain Analysis, Accurate Mapping, Visual Collection and Interpretation Agency — hints at how it has created a critical mass of engineers indispensable for the future of this industry. The secretive unit has only recently allowed limited discussion of its work. But with an estimated 25,000 graduates, it has created a deep pool of talent that the tech sector has snapped up. 

Soldiers in Unit 9900 are assigned to strip out nuggets of intelligence from the images provided by Israel’s drones and satellites — from surveilling the crowded, chaotic streets of the Gaza Strip to the unending swaths of desert in Syria and the Sinai. 

With so much data to pour over, Unit 9900 came up with solutions, including recruiting Israelis on the autistic spectrum for their analytical and visual skills. In recent years, says Shir Agassi, who served in Unit 9900 for more than seven years, it learned to automate much of the process, teaching algorithms to spot nuances, slight variations in landscapes and how their targets moved and behaved.....“We had to take all these photos, all this film, all this geospatial evidence and break it down: how do you know what you’re seeing, what’s behind it, how will it impact your intelligence decisions?” .....“You’re asking yourself — if you were the enemy, where would you hide? Where are the tall buildings, where’s the element of surprise? Can you drive there, what will be the impact of weather on all this analysis?”

Computer vision was essential to this task....Teaching computers to look for variations allowed the unit to quickly scan thousands of kilometres of background to find actionable intelligence. “You have to find ways not just to make yourself more efficient, but also to find things that the regular eye can’t,” she says. “You need computer vision to answer these questions.”.....The development of massive databases — from close-ups of farm insects to medical scans to traffic data — has given Israeli companies a valuable headstart over rivals. And in an industry where every new image teaches the algorithm something useful, that has made catching up difficult.......“Computer vision is absolutely the thread that ties us to other Israeli companies,” he says. “I need people with the same unique DNA — smart PhDs in mathematics, neural network analysis — to tell a player in the NBA how to improve his jump shot.”
Israel  cyber_security  hackers  cyber_warfare  dual-use  Israeli  security_&_intelligence  IDF  computer_vision  machine_learning  Unit_9900  start_ups  gene_pool  imagery  algorithms  actionable_information  geospatial  mapping  internal_systems  PhDs  drones  satellites  surveillance  autism 
november 2018 by jerryking
Facebook’s Security Chief to Depart for Stanford University
Aug. 1, 2018 | The New York Times| By Sheera Frenkel and Kate Conger.

Alex Stamos, Facebook's Security Chief, will exit this month to join Stanford University in September as an adjunct professor and become part of a faculty working group called Information Warfare where he will examine the role of security and technology in society.....In an internal Facebook post from January Stamos wrote that the company’s security team was being reorganized and would no longer operate as a stand-alone entity. Instead, he wrote, Facebook’s security workers would be more closely aligned with the product and engineering teams and focus either on protecting the company’s corporate infrastructure or its users......Stamos had been working with the Stanford cyberpolicy program for several years and had piloted a “hack lab” class this past spring.....At Stanford, he plans to study the upcoming midterms and the role of technology, as well as election security more broadly and the topic of disinformation. He said he would also look at subjects as basic as passwords and try to reimagine how they could be made more secure.........Mr. Stamos also said Information Warfare was a new working group at Stanford with about 14 faculty members across academic disciplines. The group, which will begin meeting this fall, plans to research information warfare tactics and to develop countermeasures. Mr. Stamos said he planned to teach a class for law and policy students on how hackers attack, with the goal of familiarizing future policymakers with common hacking techniques......Stamos wants to address issues including online child safety and the naming of a country or group responsible for a cyberattack.
cyberattacks  cyber_security  Colleges_&_Universities  disinformation  Facebook  information_warfare  security_&_intelligence  Sheryl_Sandberg  Stanford  political_influence  C-suite  countermeasures  hackers 
august 2018 by jerryking
Why is America so bad at information wars?
JULY 18, 2018 | Financial Times | Gillian Tett.

In his new book Messing With the Enemy, Clint Watts, a former FBI agent, describes this exchange as the first “international-terrorist-versus-counter-terrorist Twitter battle”......One way to make sense of today’s extraordinary cyber battles with the Russians is to look at how jihadi groups developed such campaigns years earlier — not least because this oft-ignored parallel shows how the US government has done a poor job fighting its enemies in cyberspace. “America sucks at information warfare,” Watts laments. “Absolutely sucks.”.....US officials attempted to fight back against Isis’s social media campaigns. Watts reveals that in 2013 while at the FBI — and later as a security consultant — he engaged in a long Twitter duel with American-born terrorist Omar Hammami. Other US intelligence groups tried to develop psychological-operations campaigns to fight the extremists. Some of the experimental techniques used to profile social media users were later deployed in the ad-tech industry by companies such as Cambridge Analytica.

However, the US military was simply too bureaucratic, slow moving and rule-laden to match its enemies. And the country that seemed to learn the most from the social media extremists was Russia: Watts describes how he inadvertently witnessed Russian-backed groups populating American social media from the autumn of 2015 onwards, copying some of the tactics of the Islamists....Watts’s proposed remedy is just as startling: he believes that US government agencies are now so ill-equipped to fight in these type of social media wars that it is time for non-government groups to take the lead instead.....many leading figures in Silicon Valley furtively express similar views. Indeed, some appear to be quietly funding civilian “volunteers” to do exactly what Watts suggests: namely, hunt for ways to counter Russian attacks by infiltrating enemy cyber groups.

Who knows whether this type of grass-roots action will work, or how widespread it might be — everything is deeply murky in the arena of cyberspace and information wars.
Gillian_Tett  information_warfare  U.S.  security_&_intelligence  Twitter  al-Shabab  books  cyber_warfare  Russians  hackers  Russia  disinformation  persuasion  trolls  politics  delegitimization  destabilization  deception  infiltration 
july 2018 by jerryking
Opinion | The Man Who Changed the World, Twice - The New York Times
May 8, 2018 | NYT | by David Brooks.
This column is about a man, Stewart Brand, who changed the world, at least twice. I want to focus less on the impact of his work, which is all around us, and more on how he did it, because he’s a model of how you do social change.....In 1965, Brand created a multimedia presentation called “America Needs Indians,” which he performed at the LSD-laced, proto-hippie gatherings he helped organize in California.

Brand then had two epiphanies. First, there were no public photos of the entire earth. Second, if people like him were going to return to the land and lead natural lives, they would need tools......launched the the “Whole Earth Catalog.”....the Catalog....was also a bible for what would come to be known as the counterculture, full of reading lists and rich with the ideas of Buckminster Fuller and others........When a culture changes, it’s often because a small group of people on society’s margins find a better way to live, parts of which the mainstream adopts. Brand found a magic circle in the Bay Area counterculture. He celebrated it, publicized it, gave it a coherence it otherwise lacked and encouraged millions to join.....The communes fizzled. But on the other side of the Bay Area, Brand sensed another cultural wave building-- computers!! Brand and others imagined computers launching a consciousness revolution — personal tools to build neural communities that would blow the minds of mainstream America. [See Fred Turner says in “From Counterculture to Cyberculture,” ].......Brand played cultural craftsman once again, as a celebrity journalist. In 1972 he wrote a piece for Rolling Stone announcing the emergence of a new outlaw hacker culture..... Brand is a talented community architect. In the 1970s, he was meshing Menlo Park computer geeks with cool hippie types. The tech people were entranced by “Whole Earth,” including Steve Jobs....In 1985, Brand and Larry Brilliant helped create the Well, an early online platform (like Usenet) where techies could meet and share. .......Brand’s gift, Frank Foer writes in “World Without Mind,” is “to channel the spiritual longings of his generation and then to explain how they could be fulfilled through technology.” Innovations don’t just proceed by science alone; as Foer continues, “the culture prods them into existence.”....... Brooks argues that the computer has failed as a source of true community. Social media seems to immiserate people as much as it bonds them. And so there’s a need for future Brands, young cultural craftsmen who identify those who are building the future, synthesizing their work into a common ethos and bringing them together in a way that satisfies the eternal desire for community and wholeness.

===========================================
Third, the age seems to reward procedural architects (e.g. Facebook, Twitter, Wikipedia, etc. , people who can design an architecture/platform that allows other people to express ideas or to collaborate. Fourth, people who can organize a decentralized network around a clear question, without letting it dissipate or clump, will have enormous value. Fifth, essentialists will probably be rewarded--the ability to grasp the essence of one thing, and then the essence of some very different thing, and smash them together to create some entirely new thing. Sixth, the computer is the computer. The role of the human is not to be dispassionate, depersonalized or neutral. It is precisely the emotive traits that are rewarded: the voracious lust for understanding, the enthusiasm for work, the ability to grasp the gist, the empathetic sensitivity to what will attract attention and linger in the mind. Unable to compete when it comes to calculation, the best workers will come with heart in hand.
David_Brooks  Stewart_Brand  community_builders  product_launches  counterculture  community_organizing  Silicon_Valley  '70s  trailblazers  social_change  role_models  via:marshallk  hackers  social_media  Steve_Jobs  books 
may 2018 by jerryking
Are you mentally prepared for a cyber attack?
JULY 5, 2017 | FT | by Madhumita Murgia.

“Cyber attacks are not benign. Even when no one suffers physical harm, the opportunity to cause anxiety and stress, instil fear and disrupt everyday life is immense,”.......journalists write about how companies and governments struggle to cope with the fallout from a cyber attack, but the longer-lasting impact on the human psyche has remained largely unexplored. Clearly, the anxiety prompted by cyber attacks is different from that associated with “traditional” acts of terrorism that cause deaths and injury to civilians. .... “Our analysis suggests that the psychological harm of cyber war can affect wellbeing nonetheless.” Identity theft, online threats of personal harm and the disclosure of confidential data such as medical records can cause significant distress........
........Samir Kapuria, a senior executive at Symantec, a global cyber-security company, is at the frontline of damage control, often helping clients after a cyber crime. He admitted that the corporate world was “in a state of urgency” when it came to dealing with the scale and virality of cyber attacks.

“The early 2000s was an era of mass cyber crime, when viruses like Stuxnet were released to disrupt with criminal intent. Today, with attacks like WannaCry and Petya, we are entering the era of intelligence,” says Kapuria, “moving from locks to surveillance to early detection.”
cyber_security  hackers  cyberthreats  malware  cyberattacks  psychology  panic  viruses  security_&_intelligence  Symantec  identity_theft  left_of_the_boom  surveillance  human_psyche  stressful  disaster_preparedness 
may 2018 by jerryking
Cyberattacks Put Russian Fingers on the Switch at Power Plants, U.S. Says
MARCH 15, 2018 | The New York Times | By NICOLE PERLROTH and DAVID E. SANGER.

The Trump administration accused Russia on Thursday of engineering a series of cyberattacks that targeted American and European nuclear power plants and water and electric systems, and could have sabotaged or shut power plants off at will.....Russian hacks had taken an aggressive turn. The attacks were no longer aimed at intelligence gathering, but at potentially sabotaging or shutting down plant operations.....Though a major step toward deterrence, publicly naming countries accused of cyberattacks still is unlikely to shame them into stopping. The United States is struggling to come up with proportionate responses to the wide variety of cyberespionage, vandalism and outright attacks.
Russia  security_&_intelligence  cyberattacks  vandalism  cyber_security  power_grid  infrastructure  NSA  vulnerabilities  hackers  U.S._Cyber_Command  David_Sanger  cyberphysical  physical_world 
march 2018 by jerryking
Pentagon Turns to High-Speed Traders to Fortify Markets Against Cyberattack
Oct. 15, 2017 7| WSJ | By Alexander Osipovich.

"What it would be like if a malicious actor wanted to cause havoc on U.S. financial markets?".....Dozens of high-speed traders and others from Wall Street are helping the Pentagon study how hackers could unleash chaos in the U.S. financial system. The Department of Defense’s research arm, DARPA, over the past year and a half has consulted executives at high-frequency trading firms and quantitative hedge funds, and people from exchanges and other financial companies, participants in the discussions said. Officials described the effort, the Financial Markets Vulnerabilities Project, as an early-stage pilot project aimed at identifying market vulnerabilities.

Among the potential scenarios: Hackers could cripple a widely used payroll system; they could inject false information into stock-data feeds, sending trading algorithms out of whack; or they could flood the stock market with fake sell orders and trigger a market crash......Among potential targets that could appeal to hackers given their broad reach are credit-card companies, payment processors and payroll companies such as ADP, which handles the paychecks for one in six U.S. workers, participants said.....The goal of Darpa’s project is to develop a simulation of U.S. markets, which could be used to test scenarios, Such software would need to model complex, interrelated markets—not just stocks but also markets such as futures—as well as the behavior of automated trading systems operating within them....Many quantitative trading firms already do something similar.......
In 2009, military experts took part in a two-day war game exploring a “global financial war” involving China and Russia, according to “Currency Wars: The Making of the Next Global Crisis,” a 2011 book by James Rickards. ....“Our charge at Darpa is to think far out,” he said. “It’s not ‘What is the attack today?’ but ‘What are the vectors of attack 20 years from now?’”
Pentagon  financial_markets  financial_system  vulnerabilities  DARPA  traders  hedge_funds  Wall_Street  hackers  books  rogue_actors  scenario-planning  cyber_security  cyber_warfare  cyberattacks  high-frequency_trading  pilot_programs  contagions 
october 2017 by jerryking
SEC Chief Wants Investors to Better Understand Cyberrisk - WSJ
Sept. 5, 2017 | WSJ | By Dave Michaels.

The chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission said Tuesday that regulators and Wall Street need to do more to educate investors about the serious risks that companies and the financial system face from cyberintrusions.

Jay Clayton, speaking at an event sponsored by New York University’s School of Law, said investors still don’t fully appreciate the threat posed by hackers. “I am not comfortable that the American investing public understands the substantial risk that we face systemically from cyber issues and I would like to see better disclosure around that,” Mr. Clayton said.
SEC  cyber_security  cyberthreats  cyberrisks  risks  hackers  cyberintrusions  regulators  Wall_Street  data_breaches  disclosure  under_appreciated  financial_system 
september 2017 by jerryking
Amy Pascal’s Hollywood Ending, Complete With Comeback Twist - The New York Times
Article on Amy Pascal, former chair of Sony Pictures, and victim of a 2014 cyberattack that ravaged the company (her private emails were stolen, published online and picked apart by the news media)....In February 2015, Sony ousted her — not over the embarrassing emails, although those didn’t help, but because her movie operation had failed to keep pace with an entertainment industry shift toward franchise films. For Ms. Pascal, this was true devastation: She had been publicly classified as outdated, an executive from another era, when stars and stories mattered more than computer-generated visual effects......Ms. Pascal, a 59-year-old woman in an industry rife with sexism and ageism, seems to have emerged stronger and happier, having reinvented herself as a producer through her company, Pascal Pictures. She will deliver three films to three different studios this year, with more than a dozen more movies on the assembly line. .....“Amy has an extremely sharp film mind, but it’s really her passionate advocacy for scripts and for talent that will make her, I believe, one of the best producers this business has ever seen,” said Thomas E. Rothman, who succeeded Ms. Pascal as Sony’s movie chairman.......the transition from studio mogul to producer is one of the most difficult pivots in show business. Producing requires hustle in a way that running a studio does not. Mustering the necessary self-motivation often proves impossible for older studio royals used to waving a scepter. The best producers put their own egos aside and let others shine. Climbing corporate rungs usually requires the opposite tactic.....“It has been a challenge to be patient and allow myself to learn, especially at this ripe age,” she said. “There’s some discomfort in that. Starting over again means you have to shut up and listen. But you don’t want to because you want to show everybody that you know something even when you don’t.”

She continued: “You think you’re making a movie when you’re a studio executive, but you’re not. The bigger the job you have in Hollywood, the less you are actually connected to the creative process. You’re in budget meetings and talking about head count all day. Your life is reactive.”....
“I never forgot that early training,” Ms. Pascal said. “When in doubt, work.”....when she lost the Sony throne, Ms. Pascal dove into producing as a remedy.....she set up a new office within days of her Sony departure and joined Ivan Reitman to remake “Ghostbusters.” It steered her mind away from self-pity, kept her focused on the future and soothed her bruised ego.....learned about ‘plussing’ ....look at something that is pretty good and figure out how to make it even better.”
bouncing_back  Sony  Hollywood  women  packaging  entertainment_industry  midlife  reinvention  producers  films  movies  studios  self-motivation  female_empowerment  adversity  data_breaches  hustle  cyberattacks  hackers  Second_Acts 
july 2017 by jerryking
Hacks Raise Fear Over N.S.A.’s Hold on Cyberweapons - The New York Times
By NICOLE PERLROTH and DAVID E. SANGER JUNE 28, 2017

The Petya ransomware attack....was built on cyberweapons (i.e. hacking tools that exploited vulnerabilities in Microsoft software) stolen from the NSA in 2016 by Shadow Brokers and made public in April 2017. Now those weapons are being deployed against various U.S. partners include the United Kingdom and Ukraine.....there is growing concern that United States intelligence agencies have rushed to create digital weapons that they cannot keep safe from adversaries or disable once they fall into the wrong hands..... the government “employs a disciplined, high-level interagency decision-making process for disclosure of known vulnerabilities” in software, “unlike any other country in the world.”....Officials fret that the potential damage from the Shadow Brokers leaks could go much further, and the agency’s own weaponry could be used to destroy critical infrastructure in allied nations or in the United States.

“Whether it’s North Korea, Russia, China, Iran or ISIS, almost all of the flash points out there now involve a cyber element,” Leon E. Panetta, the former defense secretary and Central Intelligence Agency chief.....viruses can suddenly mutate into other areas you didn’t intend, more and more,” Mr. Panetta said. “That’s the threat we’re going to face in the near future.”..... ransomware that recently gained the most attention in the Ukraine attack is believed to have been a smoke screen for a deeper assault aimed at destroying victims’ computers entirely. .....Mr. Panetta was among the officials warning years ago of a “cyber Pearl Harbor” that could bring down the American power grid. But he and others never imagined that those same enemies might use the N.S.A.’s own cyberweapons.....rogue actors actors, like North Korea and segments of the Islamic State, who have access to N.S.A. tools who don’t care about economic and other ties between nation states,”.....So long as flaws in computer code exist to create openings for digital weapons and spy tools, security experts say, the N.S.A. is not likely to stop hoarding software vulnerabilities any time soon.
adversaries  CIA  computer_viruses  cyberattacks  cyberthreats  cyberweapons  David_Sanger  exploits  hackers  Leon_Panetta  malware  NSA  North_Korea  Pentagon  power_grid  ransomware  rogue_actors  security_&_intelligence  SecDef  vulnerabilities 
june 2017 by jerryking
3 Books That Help Make Sense of Cyberwar
MAY 24, 2017 | The New York Times | By CONCEPCIÓN DE LEÓN.

DARK TERRITORY (2016)
The Secret History of Cyber War
By Fred Kaplan

CYBER WAR (2010)
The Next Threat to National Security and What to Do About It
By Richard A. Clarke and Robert K. Knake
290 pp.
338 pp.

NEUROMANCER (1984)
By William Gibson
304 pp.
cyber_warfare  fiction  books  nonfiction  Fred_Kaplan  security_&_intelligence  William_Gibson  Richard_Clarke  hackers 
may 2017 by jerryking
Hackers Hit Dozens of Countries Exploiting Stolen N.S.A. Tool
MAY 12, 2017 | - The New York Times | By NICOLE PERLROTH and DAVID E. SANGER.

Hackers exploiting malicious software stolen from the National Security Agency executed damaging cyberattacks on Friday that hit dozens of countries worldwide, forcing Britain’s public health system to send patients away, freezing computers at Russia’s Interior Ministry and wreaking havoc on tens of thousands of computers elsewhere.....The attacks appeared to be the largest ransomware assault on record, but the scope of the damage was hard to measure. It was not clear if victims were paying the ransom, which began at about $300 to unlock individual computers, or even if those who did pay would regain access to their data.

Security experts described the attacks as the digital equivalent of a perfect storm. They began with a simple phishing email, similar to the one Russian hackers used in the attacks on the Democratic National Committee and other targets last year. They then quickly spread through victims’ systems using a hacking method that the N.S.A. is believed to have developed as part of its arsenal of cyberweapons. And finally they encrypted the computer systems of the victims, locking them out of critical data, including patient records in Britain.
tools  cyber_security  cyberweapons  cyberattacks  vulnerabilities  malware  Microsoft  ransomware  hackers  NSA  exploits  blackmail  David_Sanger 
may 2017 by jerryking
Law firms will pay price for failure to hold off hackers | Evernote Web
31 December/1 January 2017 | Financial Times | Brooke Masters.

"This case of cyber meets securities fraud should serve as a wake-up call for law firms around the world: You are and will be targets of cyber hacking, because you have information available to would-be criminals," Bharara said in a statement....Other professional services firms should take note. This is not the first time the industry has been hit by hackers who specialise in what is becoming known as "outsider trading"....Accounting firms that provide tax advice on mergers, boutique advisory forms, and consultants who weigh in on synergies and downsizing plans are almost certainly on the criminals' hit list....Professional service firms will not be so lucky. Banks and companies pay extremely high prices for outside advice. They expect professionalism and confidentiality in return. Getting hacked by a bunch of Chinese traders is hardly a strong recommendation of either.
Big_Law  Chinese  confidentiality  cyber_security  cyberattacks  hackers  hacking  law_firms  M&A  malware  mergers_&_acquisitions  Preet_Bharara  professional_service_firms  SEC  security_consciousness  securities_fraud  traders 
january 2017 by jerryking
Leslie Jones’ personal site offline after hacking - The Globe and Mail
DERRIK J. LANG
LOS ANGELES — The Associated Press
Published Thursday, Aug. 25, 2016
bigotry  African-Americans  women  funnies  SNL  racism  hackers 
august 2016 by jerryking
Why Putin would be behind the DNC computer hacking - The Globe and Mail
PATRICK MARTIN
The Globe and Mail
Published Saturday, Jul. 30, 2016

U.S. security experts have concluded with near certainty that it was two groups of hackers known in the cyberworld as Fancy Bear and Cozy Bear that penetrated the computer network of the Democratic National Committee several months ago and copied thousands of e-mails and other documents. These hackers, they say, can be traced to two of Russia’s security services: the GRU, run by Russia’s military, and the FSB, the main successor to the notorious KGB.

These operations would not have been conducted without the knowledge of Russian President Vladimir Putin, the one-time head of the FSB.

Such espionage is not totally unexpected, says David Kramer of Washington’s McCain Institute, a security-oriented “do tank” (as opposed to think tank). However, “weaponizing” the operation by releasing many of the documents through the whistle-blower website WikiLeaks, is “unprecedented,” he said.
Russia  U.S.  Donald_Trump  Hillary_Clinton  information_warfare  Vladimir_Putin  Campaign_2016  Patrick_Martin  hacking  data_breaches  cyber_security  hackers  WikiLeaks  security_&_intelligence  FSB  GRU  DNC  espionage 
july 2016 by jerryking
Why Russian hackers would meddle in U.S. politics - The Globe and Mail
DEREK BURNEY AND FEN OSLER HAMPSON
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Jul. 27, 2016

But this is not just simply a titillating scandal in America’s electoral silly season. It sadly points to a fundamental weakness in the United States’ own cyberstrategy and its inability to deal effectively with autocrats who have outsized, imperial ambitions and terrorists who want to wreak havoc. Cyberattacks are increasingly the cornerstone of Russia’s regional and global military and political security strategy. They offset Moscow’s economic weakness.
Russia  hackers  cyber_security  data_breaches  cyberattacks  DNC  Campaign_2016  security_&_intelligence  autocrats 
july 2016 by jerryking
Why China Hacks - WSJ
By L. GORDON CROVITZ
Updated July 17, 2016

This case suggests a shift in China’s hacking strategy. Beijing has gone from amassing huge amounts of communications to deploying the information for its own ends. Most notably, Mr. Dahlin’s case shows that Beijing has decided it is sometimes even worth disclosing sources and methods. By showing it has access to U.S. documents, Beijing sends the message to other reformers in China that they too can be called in any time and accused of “endangering national security.”
China  hackers  security_&_intelligence  espionage  motivations  cyber_security  data_breaches  endangered 
july 2016 by jerryking
The Chinese Hackers in the Back Office - The New York Times
By NICOLE PERLROTHJUNE 11, 2016
a murky and much hyped emerging industry in selling intelligence about attack groups like the C0d0s0 group. Until recently, companies typically adopted a defensive strategy of trying to make their networks as impermeable as possible in hopes of repelling attacks. Today, so-called threat intelligence providers sell services that promise to go on the offensive. They track hackers, and for annual fees that can climb into the seven figures, they try to spot and thwart attacks before they happen.
China  hackers  cyber_security  data_breaches  pre-emption  security_&_intelligence  threats  offensive_tactics  threat_intelligence  back-office 
june 2016 by jerryking
A Computer Security Start-Up Turns the Tables on Hackers - The New York Times
By NICOLE PERLROTHJUNE 12, 2016
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cyber_security  security_&_intelligence  data_breaches  hackers 
june 2016 by jerryking
Software as Weaponry in a Computer-Connected World - The New York Times
JUNE 7, 2016 | NYT | By NICOLE PERLROTH.

On average, there are 15 to 50 defects per 1,000 lines of code in delivered software, according to Steve McConnell, the author of “Code Complete.” Today, most of the applications we rely on — Google Chrome, Microsoft, Firefox and Android — contain millions of lines of code. And the complexity of technology is increasing, and with it the potential for defects.

The motivation to find exploitable defects in widely used code has never been higher. Governments big and small are stockpiling vulnerabilities and exploits in hardware, software, applications, algorithms and even security defenses like firewalls and antivirus software.

They are using these holes to monitor their perceived enemies, and many governments are storing them for a rainy day, when they might just have to drop a payload that disrupts or degrades an adversary’s transportation, energy or financial system.

They are willing to pay anyone who can find and exploit these weaknesses top dollar to hand them over, and never speak a word to the companies whose programmers inadvertently wrote them into software in the first place.
adversaries  software  hackers  books  coding  vulnerabilities  exploits  software_bugs  bounties  black_markets  arms_race  cyber_warfare  cyber_security  Stuxnet  espionage  Iran  security_&_intelligence  malware  cyberweapons  weaponry  stockpiles  financial_system 
june 2016 by jerryking
U.S. Directs Cyberweapons at ISIS for First Time - The New York Times
APRIL 24, 2016 | NYT | By DAVID E. SANGER.

The United States has opened a new line of combat against the Islamic State, directing the military’s six-year-old Cyber Command for the first time to mount computer-network attacks that are now being used alongside more traditional weapons....The NSA, which specializes in electronic surveillance, has for years listened intensely to the militants of the Islamic State, and those reports are often part of the president’s daily intelligence briefing. But the N.S.A.’s military counterpart, Cyber Command, was focused largely on Russia, China, Iran and North Korea — where cyberattacks on the United States most frequently originate — and had run virtually no operations against what has become the most dangerous terrorist organization in the world...The goal of the new campaign is to disrupt the ability of the Islamic State to spread its message, attract new adherents, circulate orders from commanders and carry out day-to-day functions, like paying its fighters....The N.S.A. has spent years penetrating foreign networks — the Chinese military, Russian submarine communications, Internet traffic and other targets — placing thousands of “implants” in those networks to allow it to listen in.

But those implants can be used to manipulate data or to shut a network down. That frequently leads to a battle between the N.S.A. civilians — who know that to make use of an implant is to blow its cover — and the military operators who want to strike back. N.S.A. officials complained that once the implants were used to attack, the Islamic State militants would stop the use of a communications channel and perhaps start one that was harder to find, penetrate or de-encrypt.
ISIS  cyber_warfare  NSA  security_&_intelligence  terrorism  cyberweapons  exploits  hackers  software_bugs  vulnerabilities  Pentagon  U.S._Cyber_Command  campaigns  David_Sanger 
april 2016 by jerryking
F.B.I. Director Suggests Bill for iPhone Hacking Topped $1.3 Million - The New York Times
APRIL 21, 2016 | NYT | By ERIC LICHTBLAU and KATIE BENNER

The F.B.I. declined to confirm or deny Thursday whether the bureau had in fact paid at least $1.3 million for the hacking, and it declined to elaborate on Mr. Comey’s suggestive remarks.

But that price tag, if confirmed, appears in line with what other companies have offered for identifying iOS vulnerabilities.

Zerodium, a security firm in Washington that collects and then sells such bugs, said last fall that it would pay $1 million for weaknesses in Apple’s iOS 9 operating system. Hackers eventually claimed that bounty. The iPhone used by the San Bernardino gunman ran iOS 9.

“A number of factors go into pricing these bounties,” said Alex Rice, the co-founder of the security start-up HackerOne CTO, who also started Facebook’s bug bounty program. Mr. Rice said that the highest premiums were paid when the buyer didn’t intend to disclose the flaw to a party that could fix it.
bounties  FBI  hacking  encryption  James_Comey  iPhone  cyber_security  Apple  hackers  software_bugs  vulnerabilities  cryptography  exploits 
april 2016 by jerryking
Apple Policy on Bugs May Explain Why Hackers Would Help F.B.I. - The New York Times
MARCH 22, 2016 | NYT | By NICOLE PERLROTH and KATIE BENNER.

As Apple’s desktops and mobile phones have gained more market share, and as customers began to entrust more and more of their personal data to their iPhones, Apple products have become far more valuable marks for criminals and spies.....Exploits in Apple’s code have become increasingly coveted over time, especially as its mobile devices have become ubiquitous, with an underground ecosystem of brokers and contractors willing to pay top dollar for them (flaws in Apple’s mobile devices can typically fetch $1 million.)....Unlike firms like Google, Microsoft, Facebook, Twitter, Mozilla, Uber and other tech companies which all pay outside hackers, via bug bounty programs, to turn over bugs in their products and systems, Apple doesn't do this. So it's not surprising that a third party approached the F.B.I. with claims of being able to unlock an iPhone--and not Apple.
black_markets  exploits  arms_race  FBI  bounties  cyber_security  Apple  hackers  software_bugs  vulnerabilities  cryptography  encryption 
march 2016 by jerryking
Cyber stickups that retail chiefs should have learnt to fear
31 October/1 November 2015 | FT | Philip Delves Broughton

The risks in retail are now of an entirely different nature....
cyber_security  retailers  data_breaches  CEOs  Philip_Delves_Broughton  hackers  risks  Pentagon  lessons_learned 
november 2015 by jerryking
Intelligence Start-Up Goes Behind Enemy Lines to Get Ahead of Hackers - The New York Times
By NICOLE PERLROTH SEPT. 13, 2015

iSight Partners, a company that provides intelligence about threats to computer security in much the same way military scouts provide intelligence about enemy troops....For the last eight years, iSight has been quietly assembling what may be the largest private team of experts in a nascent business called threat intelligence. Of the company’s 311 employees, 243 are so-called cyberintelligence professionals, a statistic that executives there say would rank iSight, if it were a government-run cyberintelligence agency, among the 10 largest in the world, though that statistic is impossible to verify given the secretive nature of these operations.

ISight analysts spend their days digging around the underground web, piecing together hackers’ intentions, targets and techniques to provide their clients with information like warnings of imminent attacks and the latest tools and techniques being used to break into computer networks.

The company’s focus is what John P. Watters, iSight’s chief executive, calls “left of boom,” which is military jargon for the moment before an explosive device detonates.... iSight's services fill a critical gap in the battle to get ahead of threats. Most security companies, like FireEye, Symantec, Palo Alto Networks and Intel’s security unit, focus on blocking or detecting intrusions as they occur or responding to attacks after the fact.

ISight goes straight to the enemy. Its analysts — many of them fluent in Russian, Mandarin, Portuguese or 21 other languages — infiltrate the underground, where they watch criminals putting their schemes together and selling their tools.

The analysts’ reports help clients — including 280 government agencies, as well as banks and credit-card, health care, retail and oil and gas companies — prioritize the most imminent and possibly destructive threats.

Security experts say the need for such intelligence has never been greater....the last thing an executive in charge of network security needs is more alerts, he said: “They don’t have time. They need human, actionable threat intelligence.”
cyber_security  security_&_intelligence  dark_web  hackers  intelligence_analysts  iSight  Symantec  threats  humint  spycraft  pre-emption  actionable_information  noise  threat_intelligence  left_of_the_boom  infiltration 
september 2015 by jerryking
Manage like a spymaster | The Economist
Aug 29th 2015 |

The first lesson from the spymasters is that sometimes the convenience of having everything easily accessible on an internal network has to be sacrificed. Intelligence agencies’ most important stuff may not be kept on computers at all—manual typewriters and carbon paper still have their uses. ...Another lesson from counter-intelligence is the use of deception. The best way to find out if you are being attacked is to offer a tempting target. “Honeypots” are bogus but convincing computers, networks and files which will attract an attacker’s attention, while revealing his presence to the silent watchers. ...If you find out who is attacking you, and what they want, you have some options. You can bring in law-enforcement: breaching someone else’s network is a crime in most jurisdictions. ...Managers could also do with practising a little of the constructive paranoia that spymasters adopt when dealing with technology.
security_&_intelligence  cyber_security  spymasters  counterintelligence  deception  paranoia  industrial_espionage  spycraft  hackers 
august 2015 by jerryking
Unit 8200: Israel’s cyber spy agency - FT.com
July 10, 2015 | FT| by John Reed.

Unit 8200, or shmone matayim as it’s called in Hebrew, is the equivalent of America’s National Security Agency and the largest single military unit in the Israel Defence Forces....Unit 8200. In few other countries does the military establishment mingle so closely with academia and business, to all three sectors’ profit. Last year, Israel’s export of cyber security products — designed to protect companies, banks and governments from the growing “dark web” of hackers, fraudsters and snoopers — topped $6bn, exceeding Israeli exports of military hardware for the first time. Today Israel, with just eight million people, captures about 10 per cent of the global cyber security market, which is growing rapidly after high-profile hacks that in some cases — such as at Target, and Sony last year — have cost CEOs their jobs....In an open letter in September 2014, published by Israel’s Yedioth Ahronoth newspaper and broadcast on Channel 10, a group of 43 serving and former 8200 reservists revealed what they said were coercive spying tactics being used on innocent Palestinians, including the collection of embarrassing sexual, financial or other information....But what does 8200 actually do? Israel, as Netanyahu never tires of saying, lives in a “bad neighbourhood” in the Middle East, surrounded by several countries it classifies as enemy states. This requires world-class hacking and artificial intelligence tools as warfare moves from conventional battlefields — land, sea and air — to include cyber terrain.
artificial_intelligence  cyber_security  cyber_warfare  dark_web  hackers  IDF  Israel  Israeli  security_&_intelligence  spycraft  Stuxnet  Unit_8200 
july 2015 by jerryking
In the Dark Corners of the Web, a `Spider' Intercepts Hackers
April 22, 2015 | Bloomberg Business| by Edward Robinson

Encircling enterprises with digital force fields to protect against invasion is an outdated strategy, as the intrusions at JPMorgan Chase, Sony, and Target have demonstrated, according to James Chappell, Digital Shadows’ co-founder and chief technology officer. IT systems have simply become too open and diffuse to keep the bad guys out.
“Social media, long supply chains, mobile technology. There is now so much that no longer lives within the castle walls; it lives beyond them,” he says. “You can no longer assume that you’ll never be hacked. You have to assume that you will be.”
Enter the spider, a program of the firm’s own design. Crawling through shadowy corners such as the Deep Web and the Tor network, the program searches 80 million data sources in 26 languages for signs that Digital Shadows’ clients are at risk.
cyberattacks  Digital_Shadows  cyber_security  banks  hackers  malware  United_Kingdom  London  data_breaches  dark_web  pre-emption  network_risk  cyberintrusions  left_of_the_boom 
may 2015 by jerryking
Sony needs to stop playing the victim - The Globe and Mail
MIA PEARSON
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Dec. 25 2014

2014 has us [that]...cyber attacks and hacking scandals are now a fact of life.

According to McAfee Labs 2015 Threat Predictions, cyber attacks will grow in frequency and range in 2015, and some experts believe 2015 could be the year a major company goes out of business because it failed to adequately prepare for a cyber attack.

Indeed, how your brand prepares for this new age of corporate cyber-terrorism could define your business....Sony’s real misstep has less to do with its decision to pull – and then subsequently green light – the movie, and more about their lack of leadership in place to handle this kind of situation. The strategy – or rather, lack thereof – conveyed little confidence or resilience to the public....Sony continues to play the victim card, but executives at the company only have themselves to blame for not clearly communicating the reasons for their decisions to the public and holding strong to that strategy.
crisis  crisis_management  data_breaches  hackers  cyberattacks  cyber_security  victimhood  Sony_Pictures  public_relations  Communicating_&_Connecting  threats  missteps  brands  preparation  frequency_and_severity 
december 2014 by jerryking
Holman Jenkins: Sony Lesson: Don’t Get Hacked - WSJ
By HOLMAN W. JENKINS, JR.
Dec. 19, 2014

What we want to know, the FBI is unlikely to find out: What exactly North Korea’s role was and how it may have stimulated others to act on its behalf. North Korean hackers stand on the shoulders of giants—Russian content thieves, Chinese business-secret spies, the politically minded hacktivsts who’ve been strafing Sony for a decade. Hacking is a swarm effort. Participants often don’t even know each other’s real names and nationalities. Don’t be surprised if hacker networks are also full of U.S. agents working for various government departments. Arrests might not have been made in the PlayStation case if a key participant hadn’t been an FBI informant....How Sony’s data security, given this history, could have been so third-rate is a mystery for a future business-school case study....
Holman_Jenkins  lessons_learned  hackers  cyber_security  North_Korea  cyber_warfare  Sony  vulnerabilities  blackmail  cyberattacks 
december 2014 by jerryking
North Korea: How Can the U.S. Respond to Sony Hack Attack? - WSJ
Dec. 20, 2014 | WSJ | By JONATHAN CHENG And JEYUP S. KWAAK.

SEOUL—U.S. President Barack Obama ’s warning on Friday of punitive action against North Korea following the cyberattack on Sony Pictures Entertainment raises a sticky question: what can the world’s leading military and economic power do to an isolated country that has successfully resisted decades worth of attempts to rein in its hostility?...However, engaging in any kind of cyber tit-for-tat with North Korea could undermine trust in the security of online banking and shopping services,
North_Korea  cyber_security  cyber_warfare  Sony  retaliation  sanctions  blacklists  economic_warfare  money_laundering  hackers  punitive  retribution  undermining_of_trust  cyberattacks 
december 2014 by jerryking
Powerful Thoughts From Paul Graham — Ross Hudgens
21. Empathy is probably the single most important difference between a good hacker and a great one. Some hackers are quite smart, but practically solipsists when it comes to empathy. It’s hard for such people to design great software, because they can’t see things from the user’s point of view.

25. In a field like physics, if we disagree with past generations it’s because we’re right and they’re wrong. But this becomes rapidly less true as you move away from the certainty of the hard sciences. By the time you get to social questions, many changes are just fashion.

34. Whatever the reason, there seems a clear correlation between intelligence and willingness to consider shocking ideas. This isn’t just because smart people actively work to find holes in conventional thinking. Conventions also have less hold over them to start with. You can see that in the way they dress.

43. E.B. White was amused to learn from a farmer friend that many electrified fences don’t have any current running through them. The cows apparently learn to stay away from them, and after that you don’t need the current. | If you’re a hacker who has thought of one day starting a startup, there are probably two things keeping you from doing it. One is that you don’t know anything about business. The other is that you’re afraid of competition. Neither of these fences have any current in them.

50. But since for most of the world’s history the main route to wealth was to steal it, we tend to be suspicious of rich people.

59. “A lot of the (people applying to be graduate students at MIT) seem smart,” he said. “What I can’t tell is whether they have any kind of taste.” Taste. You don’t hear that word much now. And yet we still need the underlying concept, whatever we call it. What my friend meant was that he wanted students who were not just good technicians, but who could use their technical knowledge to design beautiful things.

64. Good design resembles nature. It’s not so much that resembling nature is intrinsically good as that nature has had a long time to work on the problem. So it’s a good sign when your answer resembles nature’s.

70. You’re most likely to get good design if the intended users include the designer himself. When you design something for a group that doesn’t include you, it tends to be for people you consider less sophisticated than you, not more sophisticated. And looking down on the user, however benevolently, always seems to corrupt the designer. [Good design therefore requires personal risk? having skin in the game?]

76. “Of all tyrannies, a tyranny exercised for the good of its victims may be the most oppressive.” – C.S. Lewis
biomimicry  business  inspiration  productivity  quotes  start_ups  Paul_Graham  Y_Combinator  via:hotchkiss  empathy  design  UX  hackers  personal_risk  PhDs  aesthetics  dangerous_ideas  smart_people  the_single_most_important 
november 2014 by jerryking
Makers and Breakers - NYTimes.com
NOV. 8, 2014 | NYT | Thomas L. Friedman.

This is a great time to be a maker, an innovator, a starter-upper. Thanks to the Internet, you can raise capital, sell goods or services and discover collaborators and customers globally more easily than ever. This is a great time to make things. But it is also a great time to break things, thanks to the Internet. If you want to break something or someone, or break into somewhere that is encrypted, and collaborate with other bad guys, you can recruit and operate today with less money, greater ease and greater reach than ever before. This is a great time to be a breaker. That’s why the balance of power between makers and breakers will shape our world every bit as much as the one between America, Russia and China.
Tom_Friedman  entrepreneurship  hackers  Cleveland  innovation  start_ups  immigrants  rogue_actors  supply_chains  globalization  lean  small_business  microproducers  Israeli 
november 2014 by jerryking
A hacker mindset for success, the accelerated way - FT.com
September 10, 2014 | FT | By Emma Jacobs.

Cedarbrae: Book Nonfiction In Library 650.1 SNO

Shane Snow’s book Smartcuts....too many of us are mired in dated ways of doing things, argues Snow. Traditional thinking goes something like this: if we pay our dues and take our time, we might earn great success. What Snow suggests instead is that we learn from people such as Groupon's Mr Mason, who “buck the norm and do incredible things in implausibly short amounts of time”.

Snow, a tech journalist in New York and co-founder of Contently, which provides content for brands, believes we all need a hacker mindset to become successful. He is not advocating criminality or even the skills of a coder but suggests applying lateral thinking to careers and business problems. Rather than shortcuts, he advocates ethical “smartcuts”, hence the book’s title. Classic success advice, he writes, is “work 100 hours a week, believe you can do it, visualise, and push yourself harder than everyone else. Claw that nail out with your bare hands ‘til they bleed if necessary”. He dismisses this as “the hard way”.
He argues, for example, that mentors do not work because they are stiff and formulaic.
hackers  books  career_paths  disruption  attitudes  lateral_thinking  thinking  hacks  mindsets  shortcuts  speed 
september 2014 by jerryking
China Hacking Is Deep and Diverse, Experts Say - WSJ
May 29, 2014 | WSJ | By DANNY YADRON in San Francisco, JAMES T. AREDDY in Shanghai and PAUL MOZUR in Beijing CONNECT
China  hackers  cyber_warfare  cyberattacks  cyber_security 
august 2014 by jerryking
‘The Director,’ by David Ignatius, a Novel About the C.I.A.
June 3, 2014 | NYTimes.com |By MICHIKO KAKUTANI.

Mr. Ignatius writes that “The Director” is “ultimately about American intelligence in the age of WikiLeaks, and whether it can adapt to a more open digital world and still do the hard work of espionage.” And the novel does provide a harrowing sense of the vulnerability of governments and ordinary people alike to cybercrime, surveillance and digital warfare in this day when almost anything and everything can be stolen or destroyed with some malicious pieces of code and a couple clicks of a mouse.....giving an intimate sense of American intelligence operations in a post-Sept. 11 world, and puts them in historical perspective with operations from the World War II and Cold War eras. He also provides a detailed, energetically researched account of how hackers inside and outside the government operate: how malware and back doors and worms actually work, how easily security and privacy shields can be breached, how relatively defenseless many financial networks are.
back_doors  books  book_reviews  CIA  cyber_security  cyber_warfare  David_Ignatius  espionage  exploits  fiction  hackers  hard_work  malware  security_&_intelligence  software_bugs  vulnerabilities  WikiLeaks 
june 2014 by jerryking
Great Hackers
(Charles Waud & WaudWare. Can Waudware develop on a different platform, enabling 3rd parties to develop for it? Would that make PICs more commercially appealing?)

There's no controversy about which idea is most controversial: the suggestion that variation in wealth might not be as big a problem as we think.

I didn't say in the book that variation in wealth was in itself a good thing. I said in some situations it might be a sign of good things. A throbbing headache is not a good thing, but it can be a sign of a good thing-- for example, that you're recovering consciousness after being hit on the head.

Variation in wealth can be a sign of variation in productivity. (In a society of one, they're identical.) And that is almost certainly a good thing: if your society has no variation in productivity, it's probably not because everyone is Thomas Edison. It's probably because you have no Thomas Edisons.

In a low-tech society you don't see much variation in productivity....In programming, as in many fields, the hard part isn't solving problems, but deciding what problems to solve. Imagination is hard to measure, but in practice it dominates the kind of productivity that's measured in lines of code.

Productivity varies in any field, but there are few in which it varies so much (as software development)..This is an area where managers can make a difference. Like a parent saying to a child, I bet you can't clean up your whole room in ten minutes, a good manager can sometimes redefine a problem as a more interesting one.
Paul_Graham  hackers  productivity  software_developers  software_development  coding  programming  income_distribution  income_inequality  WaudWare  imagination  variations  productivity_payoffs  Thomas_Edison  discernment  worthwhile_problems 
february 2014 by jerryking
Chinese Hackers Target U.S. Media - WSJ.com
January 31, 2013 | WSJ | By SIOBHAN GORMAN, DEVLIN BARRETT and DANNY YADRON.
Chinese Hackers Hit U.S. Media
Wall Street Journal, New York Times Are Breached in Campaign That Stretches Back Several Years
Chinese  hackers  NYT  WSJ  FBI  cyber_security 
february 2013 by jerryking
Hacking with Chinese Characteristics : The New Yorker
January 31, 2013
Hacking with Chinese Characteristics
Posted by Evan Osnos
China  NYT  hackers  cyber_security 
february 2013 by jerryking
The Frightening Things You Hear at a Black Hat Conference - NYTimes.com
July 27, 2012, 4:59 pm5 Comments
The Frightening Things You Hear at a Black Hat Conference
By NICOLE PERLROTH
black_hats  cyber_security  threats  hackers  conferences 
july 2012 by jerryking
U.S. Probe Ties Chinese Cyberspying to Military - WSJ.com
December 13, 2011 | WSJ |By SIOBHAN GORMAN.
U.S. Homes In on China Spying
Probe Pinpoints Groups of Hackers and Ties Most to Military; Officials Prepare to Confront Beijing
cyber_warfare  China  hackers  PLA  NSA  security_&_intelligence  espionage 
april 2012 by jerryking
THE ABCs OF CYBER-SECURITY
April 27, 2012 | Report on Business | Ivor Tossell
Everything today is digital - and, increasingly, everything is getting hacked. To be absolutely safe, you could move into a cave. Or you could read our handy primer by online culture.xpert Ivor Tossell

IVOR TOSSELL
cyber_security  hackers  China  cyber_warfare  primers 
april 2012 by jerryking
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