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jerryking : hair   14

P&G Buys Walker & Co. to Expand Offerings to African-Americans - WSJ
By Aisha Al-Muslim
Dec. 12, 2018

Procter & Gamble Co. PG +0.19% has acquired Walker & Co. Brands as the consumer-products giant looks to serve more African-Americans with health and beauty products.

Palo Alto, Calif.-based Walker sells grooming products for men under the brand Bevel and hair-care products for women under the Form Beauty brand.

Walker will operate as a separate and wholly owned subsidiary of P&G, continuing to be led by its founder and Chief Executive Tristan Walker, ......Last year, Anglo-Dutch consumer products firm Unilever PLC acquired Sundial Brands, a New York-based hair-care and skin-care products company predominantly targeting African-Americans, for an undisclosed sum. Sundial’s brands include SheaMoisture, Nubian Heritage, Madam C.J. Walker and nyakio.
African-Americans  Bevel  black-owned  brands  exits  hair  P&G  personal_care_products  personal_grooming  Tristan_Walker  Unilever  founders 
december 2018 by jerryking
A Beauty Product’s Ads Exclude the Black Women Who Use It - The New York Times
By TRESSIE McMILLAN COTTOM MAY 3, 2017

..................When black women bought SheaMoisture products, they were rejecting powerful stereotypes about black women’s hair as inherently unattractive. Unwittingly or not, SheaMoisture was part of a political project for black women, helping us resist harmful biases about our natural hair that circumscribe our choices and well-being.

But Sundial Brands, the black-owned company that runs SheaMoisture, has its own goals. In 2015, it company sold a minority stakee to Bain Capital to finance an expansion. At the time, Richelieu Dennis, the chief executive of Sundial, said SheaMoisture would be pursuing the “new general market,” which he described as a “consolidation of cultures, ethnicities and demographics aligned with commonalities, needs and lifestyles.”

To believe it is possible to diversify SheaMoisture beyond its black natural-hair customer base, one must believe that black beauty is desirable for non-black consumers. For that to be true, black women would have to be an ideal beauty type in the global market that Mr. Dennis was going after. Mr. Dennis had one problem: reality..........SheaMoisture could not sell a product meant to make black women look “whiter,” such as a chemical treatment to straighten hair, without changing its entire product line. But it could concede to the demands of capital by marketing its existing products to non-black women. SheaMoisture eventually apologized, acknowledging the insult many black women felt. By prominently featuring white women in what had become a political project, the company had signaled to black women that we could never be enough.

Beauty is never just about preference. It is about economics and power and exclusion. Brands like SheaMoisture rely on certain ideas of what is beautiful to make money.
biases  blackness  personal_grooming  personal_care_products  women  African-Americans  hair  beauty  colorism  shadism  brands 
may 2017 by jerryking
No barrier’s too big for Brazilian hair-care pioneer
Mar. 20 2015 | The Globe and Mail | STEPHANIE NOLEN.

The barrier-breaking Leila Velez: By bringing fast-food standardization and Disney’s customer-service model to her hair-care business serving Brazil’s black and mixed-race women, the bootstraps entrepreneur has taken Beleza Natural from one tiny storefront to a chain of 29 locations – and her ambitions don't stop there.
Stephanie_Nolen  personal_care_products  personal_grooming  Brazilian  gazelles  women  trailblazers  Afro-Brazilians  hair  standardization  entrepreneur 
march 2015 by jerryking
Getting the head straight about hair loss - The Globe and Mail
dr. marla shapiro
From Tuesday's Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Feb. 28, 2006
mens'_health  personal_grooming  hair 
november 2011 by jerryking
Her Formula for Success - WSJ.com
APRIL 23, 2003|WSJ|By NICHOLAS VON HOFFMAN.
HER DREAM OF DREAMS

By Beverly Lowry
(Knopf, 481 pages, $27.50)

To appreciate Madam Walker's accomplishments, you have to know what she was up against. The barriers of sex, tough as they were, do not compare with those of race. Post-slavery America, Madam's America, was a society of unremitting violence toward black people. Readers will learn, for instance, that when toting up the annual white-on-black killing statistics, the statisticians of the time paused to ponder whether a man who had a heart attack running from the dogs set on him belonged in the lynched, murdered or accidental-death column.
heart_attacks  personal_care_products  segregation  women  trailblazers  African-Americans  moguls  book_reviews  C.J.Walker  the_South  Jim_Crow  hair  personal_grooming  entrepreneur  racial_violence  lynchings  terror 
november 2011 by jerryking
Surgeon General Calls for Health Over Hair - NYTimes.com
August 25, 2011, 5:52 pm
Surgeon General Calls for Health Over Hair
By ANAHAD O'CONNOR
hair  African-Americans 
august 2011 by jerryking
Hip-hop barbers break down race barrier
June 12, 2010 | Globe & Mail via Updated News | Joe
Friesen. The barbershop is, paradoxically, a place to congregate and to
remain separate. It's a spot where men hang out and shoot the breeze,
but they often do it in narrowly defined groups. Hair cutting and race
intersect in complex ways, which has meant that black barbershops in
Toronto have catered almost exclusively to clients with an
Afro-Caribbean background. But for a generation raised with hip hop as
its mainstream culture, those barriers are collapsing.....When co-owners
Kirk Tulloch and Lowell Stephens opened the shop near the Eaton Centre,
their goal was to create a different kind of space. In the polyglot
downtown, they wouldn't be able to rely on an established neighbourhood
clientele, so they had to appeal to the cosmopolitan core.
Toronto  African_Canadians  barbershops  hip_hop  personal_grooming  cosmopolitan  hair 
november 2010 by jerryking
Tiny Firms Go Global to Boost Sales - WSJ.com
APRIL 17, 2007 | Wall Street Journal | by RIVA RICHMOND. Small
U.S. businesses are increasingly looking to other countries to boost
their businesses through the import of cheaper or better products. By
tapping international markets directly, small firms can cut the costs of
a middleman and limit their dependence on the U.S. market for supplies.
An expanded product selection also could lead to bigger sales. But
challenges like different customs, language and legal protections,
time-zone differences and even the local weather can make that new
business hard won.
size  entrepreneur  India  African-Americans  personal_care_products  solo  small_business  international_trade  hair  women  globalization  personal_grooming  start_ups  micro  producers  beyondtheU.S.  localization  internationally_minded 
may 2009 by jerryking

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