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jerryking : hard_times   38

Black Americans Need Bourgeois Norms - WSJ
By Robert L. Woodson
Oct. 11, 2017

This summer, law professors Amy Wax and Larry Alexander caused a stir with an op-ed lamenting the decline of what they called “bourgeois norms.” “All cultures are not equal,” they rightly observed. Those that encourage self-restraint, delayed gratification, marriage and a strong work ethic tend to thrive. Those that tolerate or excuse substance abuse, out-of-wedlock pregnancy and dropping out tend to break down.

Ms. Wax and Mr. Alexander were instantly accused of racism by the growing army of angry academics who police the prevailing narrative of black victimhood. According to this narrative, black progress is determined not by personal choices and individual behavior, but by white supremacy, America’s history of slavery and discrimination, and institutional racism. Touting “bourgeois values” is interpreted as an offense against authentic black culture.......A better life has always been available to those who reject undisciplined and irresponsible behavior, and embrace self-determination and personal responsibility. So-called bourgeois values have always empowered blacks to persevere and overcome bitter oppression. They provided the moral “glue” that held the black community together during the hardest of times.
Amy_Wax  cultural_norms  cultural_values  Frederick_Douglass  values  victimhood  hard_times  African-Americans  self-restraint  delayed_gratification  marriage  work_ethic  personal_responsibility  societal_norms  authenticity  bourgeois 
october 2017 by jerryking
To Survive in Tough Times, Restaurants Turn to Data-Mining
AUG. 25, 2017 | The New York Times | By KAREN STABINER.

“Silicon Valley looks at inefficiencies in the world, and they aim to disrupt the food space,” said Erik Oberholtzer, a founder and the chief executive of Tender Greens, a quick-service chain based in Los Angeles that is using data to guide its East Coast expansion.
data  data_mining  hard_times  inefficiencies  restaurants 
august 2017 by jerryking
Want to land a big client? Here are four important tips - The Globe and Mail
MATTHIJS KEIJ
Young Entrepreneur Council
Published Tuesday, Aug. 12 2014

Study them

Landing a big client isn’t about you. Let me say that again: It is not about you.... remember that to succeed, you must help your client succeed. How do you do that? Study everything you can about the client until you fully understand the business, strategies and objectives.

Next, clearly define how your product or service will help the company achieve its goals. If you can identify a problem or isolate areas for improvement, then you can clearly illustrate your ability to provide a unique solution.

Make the connection. to land that enterprise client, try to identify your Norgay or Hillary. Talking to the wrong people wastes valuable time. However, if you can create a relationship with a strategic partner, that person can help get you in front of the right people and into the necessary meetings – all the more quickly than you could do on your own. Your target client is Mount Everest. Start climbing.
Gain influence

“An enterprise client needs to be convinced that working with your company is the best decision they could ever make,” says Karthik Manimozh, president and COO of 1-Page. “One of the most effective ways to help them arrive at this conclusion is to let your reputation precede you.”

The leadership, prestige and visibility that your company wields in the marketplace are all key factors that influence buying decisions. The answers your potential enterprise client seeks rest on your ability to shape your story. Good PR and marketing is the foundation. Strategic networking and social proof are pillars.

Remember, influence is something that comes with hard work...Be everywhere; talk with everyone (but ensure your conversations are informative and upbeat, never desperate).

Persevere through tough times

It can take months or even more than a year to land an enterprise client. Nothing worth having comes easy.

During that time, you’re bound to find yourself in countless meetings, possibly caught up in the middle of office politics, or jumping through hoops as the legal and procurement departments vet your company. Don’t dismay. This is par for the course when trying to land an enterprise client.
solutions  solution-finders  marketing  business_development  tips  indispensable  influence  networking  JCK  due_diligence  large_companies  perseverance  Communicating_&_Connecting  value_propositions  serving_others  strategic_thinking  client_development  hard_work  enterprise_clients  hard_times  office_politics  Michael_McDerment  the_right_people 
august 2014 by jerryking
Five ways training for a marathon inspired me as an entrepreneur - The Globe and Mail
DAVID SCHNURMAN
Young Entrepreneur Council
Published Tuesday, Jul. 29 2014

1. Keep your commitment. In business, you can’t let difficult challenges prevent you from following through with a plan.

What get one through these hard times is the commitment you make and a strong belief in wanting to break it.

2. Have a clear goal and strong plan. Many entrepreneurs grow their businesses by using their gut and intuition. When you hit adversity, not having a plan isn’t always the smartest choice.

A great thing about the marathon is that there is a clear goal of 26.2 miles and a proven training schedule. Since I didn’t have to put any additional thought into the goal or plan, I was able to focus all my energy on being mentally tough enough to keep up with the 30+ mile weeks and any life challenges that got in the way.

It made me realize the stronger my convictions are in my business goals and in my plan to get there, the more mentally tough I will become.

3. Go in with the right mindset. As business owners, we focus on outside challenges such as raising money, managing a team or acquiring new customers. While all of these issues are important and need to be addressed, they do not hold a candle to the internal challenges that we face on a daily basis: stress, self doubt, negativity, loss of focus, blaming others, fear of failure, etc.

If you have the right mindset and a positive attitude, no outside force can stop you in your journey to success. When training for the marathon, I turned to inspirational speeches and videos that I could listen to while I ran. Without these videos playing in a loop, it would have been hard for me to get through some of the tougher moments. You should apply the same type of inspirational experience sharing to business. It allows you to take the 10,000 foot-view and work on the business instead of in it.

4. Run through the wall. In business, we come up against walls all the time. They key is having the right partner or mentor to help see you through it.

While training, I was told that after mile 20 the same thing happens in the marathon. It happened at mile 23 of my first marathon; I hit a wall. My feet were burning and my legs had shooting pains. All the signals in my body were telling me to stop running. But I was lucky enough to have a more experienced running partner who kept pushing me the additional 30 minutes. He motivated me and kept my focus on the finish line instead of the pain.

In business, we all can benefit from other people’s expertise to get through the pain and hit our big goals.

5. Experience new things. Too often in life we get caught up in a daily routine. Luckily, as entrepreneurs, it’s in our DNA to shake it up and learn new things. During training, I ran through almost every NYC neighborhood and found that I can develop a deep focus for hours on end. I read new books that inspired me, met new people and took part in over a dozen races.

I have transformed my mentality from someone who never ran further than 4 miles to a marathon runner. Now, the sky is the limit.
entrepreneur  gut_feelings  hard_times  intrinsically_motivated  lessons_learned  marathons  mindsets  owners  positive_thinking  running 
august 2014 by jerryking
Listen to the Squawking Chicken - Western Alumni
Spring 2014 | Alumni Gazette | by Elaine Lui, BA’96

When Elaine Lui, BA’96 (French), was growing up, her mother told her, “Why do you need to prepare for the good things that happen? They’re good. They won’t hurt you. My job is to prepare you for the hard times, and teach you how to avoid them, whenever possible.”
parenting  preparation  hard_times 
may 2014 by jerryking
Hard Times at Howard U. - NYTimes.com
FEB. 4, 2014 | NYT | By CHARLAYNE HUNTER-GAULT.

Howard has been in turmoil for several years over its fiscal direction as well as a series of public relations blunders, notably the news of bonuses to high-level administrators amounting to $1.1 million amid cost-cutting and tuition increases.
Colleges_&_Universities  African-Americans  hard_times  HBCUs  Morehouse  leadership  Washington_D.C.  crisis  education  enrollment  Howard  economics 
february 2014 by jerryking
Hard times for the Manitoba pig industry - The Globe and Mail
Charles Wilkins and Ian Willms/Boreal Collective

The Globe and Mail

Published Thursday, Feb. 21 2013
pork  Manitoba  hard_times 
february 2013 by jerryking
Two Women Pitch In During Hard Times And Find Big Rewards
July 20, 1999 | WSJ | By HAL LANCASTER.

Two Women Pitch In During Hard Times... Hard times don't necessarily mean hunkering down or looking for greener pastures. It can be a time to take on more responsibility and expand your skills.
Hal_Lancaster  Managing_Your_Career  opportunities  hard_times  opportunistic  bankruptcies  women  adversity 
december 2012 by jerryking
4 Lessons for Building a Stronger Tech Economy in Cities - Technology - The Atlantic Cities
Edward Alden
Sep 14, 2012
* Necessity is truly the mother of invention. Over the past 40 years, Detroit has lost almost two-thirds of its population, shrinking from a city of 2 million residents in the 1950s to one of just over 700,000 today, with the steepest drop in the past decade.
* Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery – at least until we figure out how to do it better.
* Cities, even ones that have fallen on hard times, are still cool.
* Rome wasn’t built — or rebuilt — in a day. Diversifying an economy like Detroit’s will take a long time.
cities  Detroit  economic_development  lessons_learned  depopulation  hard_times 
september 2012 by jerryking
Sales Spurt, Growing Pains Leave Karaoke Maker Singing the Blues - WSJ.com
July 29, 2003 | WSJ | By JEFF BAILEY - Staff Reporter of THE WALL STREET JOURNAL.

Singing Machine Co., a Coconut Creek, Fla., maker of karaoke machines. But rather than celebrating its success, these days the executives at Singing Machine are scrambling to avoid insolvency. The company's experience is a warning to all entrepreneurs about the dangers of rapid growth. Outside auditors last month noted that a default on a borrowing agreement "raises substantial doubt about the company's ability to continue as a going concern."

"It's a classic business-school case of growing pains," says Y.P. Chan, 39 years old and recently named Singing Machine's chief operating officer.

Every year, thousands of smaller companies go belly up because entrepreneurs aren't prepared to manage rapid growth. Accustomed to scratching for every sale, when the throttle is finally thrown wide open, too many assume it is clear sailing and fail to ask some important questions.
[chart]

Are your finances solid enough to support a bigger company, or are you counting on lush profits to do it? If you load up on inventory to satisfy demand, how will you survive if prices plunge? Look around -- does management have experience running a bigger enterprise? Look at your competitors -- are they bigger and likely to weather tough times better? Or are they also small companies that might get overextended and slash prices to stay afloat?
small_business  growth  bankruptcies  warning_signs  insolvency  contingency_planning  hard_times  high-growth  inventories  risk-management  overextended 
may 2012 by jerryking
Bankrupt Restaurants Are Still Holding On - NYTimes.com
By WILLIAM NEUMAN
Published: December 27, 2011

Consumers, who have generally cut back on the number of meals out since the recession began, are benefiting from the proliferation of zombies. Healthy and failing restaurants alike have been forced to discount relentlessly to lure diners. But for the restaurants, particularly small independent operators, the competition from the undead is a nightmare that just won’t end.

The hard times for restaurants began in 2008, as the recession and staggering unemployment forced Americans to cut back on dining out. During the 12-month period ending in August, the average American ate or got takeout at restaurants 195 times, down from 208 times in 2008, according to Harry Balzer, the chief food industry analyst for the NPD Group.
restaurants  bankruptcies  franchising  under-performing  oversupply  hard_times 
december 2011 by jerryking
Six Things All CEOs Can Learn From Mulally | ChiefExecutive.net | Chief Executive Magazine
Six Things All CEOs Can Learn From Mulally

June 27 2011 by JP Donlon

1. Display courage in the face of adversity.
2. Focus is everything.
3. Simplify.
4. Use the Outsider Advantage.
5. Reward transparency and collaboration.
6. Stay inventive during tough times.
Alan_Mulally  simplicity  Ford  Boeing  leadership  tips  courage  innovation  transparency  collaboration  CEOs  hard_times  adversity  focus  outsiders 
november 2011 by jerryking
The Door-To-Door Billionaire Daryl Harms knows how to turn dull businesses into big profits. But can he really do it with your garbage? - May 1, 2003
By Ed Welles
May 1, 2003

Harms spots trends sooner and bears down harder than most entrepreneurs--a combination that has made him wildly wealthy, if not exactly famous. But his next venture--more on that later-- just might transform him into a household name on the order of, say, Warren Buffett. Like Buffett, Daryl Harms, 51, patiently trolls for perfect businesses in which he can build long-term value via his Masada Resource Group, based in Birmingham. He hunts down overlooked opportunities that don't trade on trendy brand names or cutting-edge technologies...When selling cable service, Harms went block to block, zeroing in on houses with the tallest antennas. Other salesfolk reflexively bypassed such homes because they assumed that better reception wasn't an issue for them. Harms targeted those customers first. "I told them, 'I can see you stand tall. Of all the people on the street you understand the value of TV,' " he recalls saying. " 'If we put cable in, you can compare it with what you have now. If you don't like it, we'll come back and take it out.' " Such "influencers," in Harms's lingo, made it easier for him to convert whole blocks....Spurred by a poll that showed that 92% of Americans considered themselves "environmentalists," Harms and his employees spent a year studying the recycling market only to decide that the real money lay in garbage. From there they sought out the best ethanol conversion technology. Having found it--at the Tennessee Valley Authority--they worked for five years to tweak the science, an effort that has earned Masada 18 patents. "Today's risky business climate warrants thoroughness," Harms says..."The theme is that there is always a consumer need to be addressed," explains Wheeler. "People will always talk on the phone, watch television, and produce garbage."...Asking the right question, it seems, comes naturally to Harms. Entrepreneurs fail, he believes, because they "get too microscopic in their thinking. In business it's very easy to get the right answer to the wrong question." According to Wheeler, Harms failed to ask the right question when he set up a venture called Postron, which allowed cable TV subscribers to receive their bills via cable and print them out on a printer attached to their TVs. What Harms didn't ask, says Wheeler, was "whether consumers wanted another piece of hardware." They didn't...Harms finds customers where no one else thinks to look. When he started selling burglar alarms in 1985, he didn't target high-crime areas. Instead he identified places where the perception of vulnerability was greatest--which he determined by calculating how much space the local paper devoted to crime. The first cellphone license he sought was for a desolate stretch of highway between Lincoln and Omaha rather than in a major population center. Why? Because, as Page says, "what else were people going to do in their cars but talk on the phone?" Aside from overlooked customers, Harms seeks another component to every business: recurring revenue of roughly $25 a month per user. "That's a bite that most people can get used to paying," he reasons. For him it translates into healthy cash flow, which fosters predictability and enables a business to survive hard times. Besides, "the more reliable the cash flow, the higher a multiple of that cash flow you can get for your company," he notes.
entrepreneur  moguls  counterintuitive  overlooked_opportunities  unglamorous  latent  hidden  cash_flows  questions  missed_opportunities  wide-framing  hard_times  predictability  consumer_needs  subscriptions  thinking_big  asking_the_right_questions 
november 2011 by jerryking
Modern citizens know a library’s worth
Aug. 30, 2011 | Globe &Mail | VINCENT LAM. There are two
priceless features of each of the 18 million annual library visits in
this city. First, sharing wisdom through the library & its programs
increases the wealth of our community. We learn, innovate and enrich our
city by sharing knowledge through books, films, lectures and
discussion. Second, the library is completely democratic. It provides
access to information, culture &leisure for new immigrants and
established Canadians, to children and the elderly, and to all
Torontonians whether they’re rich or going through tough times.

Speaking of tough times, in which we’re told that all belts must
tighten: Such are the precise times in which those with less disposable
income need access to good libraries more than ever. Those who can’t buy
books need to access the library’s collections, not to see acquisitions
or library hours cut. The destruction of the ancient Library of
Alexandria is one of the intellectual tragedies of antiquity.
civics  citizenship  libraries  Toronto  Rob_Ford  cutbacks  hard_times  austerity  TPL  social_fabric  commonwealth  institutions  engaged_citizenry 
september 2011 by jerryking
It's good to be smart
Nov 30, 2010 |The Globe and Mail. pg. A.24 | editorial.

It may be 20 years, or 50, before there is a direct payoff from the BMO Sir Isaac Newton Chair in Theoretical Physics at the Perimeter Institute in Waterloo, Ont. Or from similar chairs to be named after Albert Einstein, Niels Bohr, Paul Dirac and James Clerk Maxwell. But the chairs are a wise investment that deserve emulating in other institutions in Canada.

It is not easy to be forward-looking in difficult times, but now is actually an excellent time to be investing in long-range projects that expand our intellectual capital. Why now? Because while other countries are hamstrung by economic problems, Canada is in decent enough shape to get a jump on attracting talent and stimulating innovation. In a borderless world economy, the value in becoming a magnet for scientists, engineers and entrepreneurs is immeasurable.

Abstract (Summary) Theoretical physics (the description of natural
phenomena in mathematical form) may seem like knowledge for knowledge's
sake. It is anything but, as Mike Lazaridis, the founder and co-chief
executive officer of the BlackBerry-maker Research in Motion Ltd., tells
it. The "next generation of value" will be intellectual capital, rather
than natural resources, he says.
Blackberry  BMO  borderless  broad-based_scientific_enquiry  editorials  endowments  forward_looking  hard_times  intellectual_capital  knowledge  Mike_Lazaridis  natural_resources  Perimeter_Institute  physicists  RIM 
april 2011 by jerryking
Next year, be ahead of the competition
Dec. 27, 2010 | Financial Post | Rick Spence

Look for ways to add more value. In tough times, most marketers look for
ways to claw back some of the value they offer their customers, as a
way to preserve margins; you can stand out by offering more. Henry Ford
said it best: "The man who will use his skill and constructive
imagination to see how much he can give for a dollar, instead of how
little he can give for a dollar, is bound to succeed."
Rick_Spence  advice  self-improvement  opportunities  opportunistic  value_creation  perks  hard_times 
december 2010 by jerryking
Preoccupations - The Urban Lands of Opportunity
June 25, 2010 | NYTimes.com |By RICHARD FLORIDA. Over the past
20 yrs., a new way of working and a new kind of workplace have evolved.
Increasingly, places (e.g. the Starbucks where we drink coffee &
send e-mail; the hotel lobby where we take a meeting; or the local
library where we write,edit & revise documents) are supplanting
plants — corporate HQ and factories — as the principal social and
economic organizing units of our time...Especially in tough times, it
makes more sense to choose a big city, with its thick labor markets and
greater economic opportunities, over a single company...The metabolic
rate of living organisms tends to slow as they increase in size. But
cities can achieve a faster rate of “urban metabolism” as they grow,
leading to more innovation, economic growth and improved living
standards. When cross-pollinated in the urban jungle, people come up
with more and better ideas and produce more results from those ideas by
finding more collaborators as well as critics.
Rotman  Richard_Florida  urban  cities  workplaces  coffeehouses  work_life_balance  cross-pollination  information_spillover  third_spaces  hard_times 
june 2010 by jerryking
Critical Questions Boards Should Ask Now
April 7, 2009 | Business Week | By Beverly Behan. Directors
must become more proactive in these tough times. It may even be
necessary to bring in new members with restructuring experience.
Results from google search "why boards should question management,"
boards_&_directors_&_governance  Freshbooks  questions  hard_times  restructurings  Octothorpe_Software 
february 2010 by jerryking
Top entrepreneurs talk about how to keep your customers, and find opportunities, in tough economic times
MAY 11, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | 5-person panel discussion
moderated by Gwendolyn Bounds. Wendy questions the group of
entrepreneurs under the theme "What’s the secret of being an
entrepreneur in these hard economic times?"....trying to stand out from the crowd. I think the best one we did, which we launched when it was about six degrees outside, was a marketing campaign that says, what this town could really use right now is a good bowl of chicken soup.

Chicken soup is one of the great comfort foods in every single culture, and we think that we need to be selling comfort right now. And chicken soup also is a way to define the restaurant. .....people are always looking for joy. They’re always looking to be connected. They’re always looking to feel generous. So Danny’s insight, which is so brilliant, is for the cost of a bowl of chicken soup, you get to feel generous. You get to feel connected. You get to feel part of the community. That story is easy to tell because we all have a memory of chicken soup growing up.......Marketing is not this blank check that lets you sell whatever you want. The challenge that we’re facing, as we enter this serious recession, is not how do we stop doing everything. It’s how do we create experiences and stories, interactions, that don’t necessarily cost a lot of money, but create value for everyone concerned.......I think that for an entrepreneur who is interested and passionate about creating something in the technology space, whether it’s a device or a service or a platform, this is an extraordinary time, because there’s an enormous lull in the Fortune 1000 with respect to innovation and new ideation. ........on the equity side, where they don’t have these types of opportunities, we look for innovative companies that actually create a disruption. The simple thing is, if you can offer the environment where we can lower your costs and improve quality, it’s a no-brainer.

But in general, we have to make certain that these entrepreneurs really know the industry, they know the customers, they know the competition and most importantly, they know thyself, they know what they can and cannot do.

So it’s interesting when you play across the capital structure, how you bifurcate this, and I think it all has to do with innovation and creating something that doesn’t exist, that fits a pent-up need.
disruption  self-awareness  Gwendolyn_Bounds  Seth_Godin  Danny_Meyer  entrepreneur  economic_downturn  hard_times  attention  innovation  ideation  ideas  underwriting  geographic_ingredient_branding  Buy_American  craftsmanship  soups  marketing  storytelling  lingerie  intimate_apparel  idea_generation  emotional_connections  small_batch  generosity  joy 
may 2009 by jerryking
In Tough Times, the Humanities Must Justify Their Worth - NYTimes.com
February 24, 2009 | New York Times | By PATRICIA COHEN.. This
article tackles the perennial debate about the importance of the
humanities in a complex and technologically demanding world have taken
on new urgency in the current economic downturn.

Previous economic downturns have often led to decreased enrollment in
the disciplines loosely grouped under the term “humanities” — which
generally include languages, literature, the arts, history, cultural
studies, philosophy and religion.
humanities  liberal_arts  literature  economic_downturn  Colleges_&_Universities  curriculum  hard_times 
may 2009 by jerryking
The Globe and Mail: In hard times, our justice system gives us a competitive edge
Monday, April 6, 2009 | The Globe & Mai Page A13 | By
WARREN WINKLER

If a customer doesn't pay, a supplier fails to deliver, a competitor
misappropriates a patent or a business partner backs out of an
exclusivity agreement, you need to know, and the wrongdoer needs to
know, that you can go to court to get a remedy. This is known as the
"rule of law." While only a fraction of transactions wind up in
litigation, an effective court system must be there - just in case.
Canadian_justice_system  infrastructure  legal_system  rule_of_law  competitive_advantage  Canada  Canadian  institutions  institutional_integrity  hard_times 
april 2009 by jerryking
Downturn Puts New Stresses on Libraries - NYTimes.com
April 1, 2009 | NYT | By SUSAN SAULNY and KAREN ANN CULLOTTA

As the economic crisis has deepened and social services have become
casualties of budget cuts, libraries have come to fill a void--acting as
first responders--for more (emotionally distraught) people,
particularly job-seekers and those who have fallen on hard times.
economic_downturn  libraries  hard_times  budget_cuts 
april 2009 by jerryking
Letters - Humanities and the Examined Life - NYTimes.com
March 1, 2009 NYT Letters to the editor responding to this Feb.
25, 2009 NYT article, "In Tough Times, the Humanities Must Justify
Their Worth "
letters_to_the_editor  education  critical_thinking  humanities  liberal_arts  hard_times  self-scrutiny  reflections 
march 2009 by jerryking
Grand Openings in Grim Times - WSJ.com
FEBRUARY 27, 2009, WSJ article by KATY MCLAUGHLIN on contrarian
chefs who are opening lavish new restaurants. Will they get burned?
opportunistic  restaurants  luxury  cost-cutting  restauranteurs  Katy_McLaughlin  hard_times 
march 2009 by jerryking
Peggy Noonan: Dynamism Isn't Dead - WSJ.com
FEBRUARY 20, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | by PEGGY NOONAN

Remembering the Dawn of the Age of Abundance: Times are hard, but dynamism isn't dead.
local  crisis  innovation  entrepreneurship  future  hard_times  inspiration  collapse-anxiety  cultural_change  regeneration_&_recovery  Peggy_Noonan  economic_dynamism 
february 2009 by jerryking
How Hard Times Can Drive Innovation - WSJ.com
Dec. 15, 2008 WSJ interview of Dr. Clayton Christensen by MIT/Sloan Management Review Senior editor Martha E. Mangelsdorf.
innovation  adversity  scarcity  tension  rethinking  disruption  Clayton_Christensen  hard_times 
february 2009 by jerryking
Tough Times Call For New Ideas - WSJ.com
FEBRUARY 14, 2009, WSJ column by KELLY K. SPORS. The savviest
entrepreneurs aren't hunkering down trying to wait out the financial
storm. They're rethinking their business models & strategies based
on the assumption that consumer spending won't be rebounding to
prerecession levels. People may want new types of products and services.
So entrepreneurs are finding new sales channels, trying new marketing
tactics and promotions, forming strategic partnerships, etc.
adversity  rethinking  marketing  innovation  business_development  Kelly_K._Spors  strategies  business_models  entrepreneurship  economic_downturn  recessions  new_products  hard_times  ideas  idea_generation 
february 2009 by jerryking
FT.com / Columnists / Luke Johnson - Ideas for challenging times
Published: June 17 2008 FT column By Luke Johnson looking at
how emerging companies can generate new ideas. Recommends a little book
called A Technique for Producing Ideas by James Webb Young. Its thesis
is both simple and applicable to many sorts of problems. The central
premise is that any new idea is in fact only a fresh combination of old
elements, plus the ability to see new relationships between known facts.
What every successful business needs is competent execution--you cannot
patent an idea and protect it from replication by a rival. Companies
are increasingly using their customers--social networking-- to help
design their products and improve their offerings.
books  brainstorming  execution  hard_times  ideas  idea_generation  Luke_Johnson  mental_dexterity  mind-mapping  serial_entrepreneur  social_networking  reinvention 
february 2009 by jerryking
Battle Stations - Sunoco's Peter Whatnell talks about how IT departments can help their companies succeed in tough times
Dec. 8, 2008 WSJ interview of Sunoco's Peter Whatnell by Ben
Worthen. The source of competitive advantage is knowing how IT can help
your business. You should to be able to ask any CIO: Are you able to
describe in three minutes or less how your company makes money? To me
that's where it starts. And the answer isn't "we're in retail" or "we're
in the insurance business" or "we're an oil company," because everyone
is in retail or the insurance business or is an oil company.....We have three measures when we are looking to approve a project: First, what does this project do to support the company's strategy. The second is what is the business case. And the third is around risk. One of the components we look at under risk is organizational change. The more change that a project would introduce, the more risky we consider the project. That doesn't mean that you don't do it, but the attention you give to the change-management activities has to be far higher.
information  technology  competitive_advantage  Ben_Worthen  change_management  change  Sunoco  think_threes  corporate  CIOs  IT  hard_times  value_creation  organizational_change  risk-assessment 
february 2009 by jerryking
Toronto Life: The Good News About the Bad Times
Feb. 2009 Toronto Life article by Philip Preville about the
multiple stakeholders uniting in the pursuing a strategy encouraging
emerging U.S. companies to go public on the TSX. In so doing, this would
boost demand for high value financial, accounting and legal services.
Toronto  strategy  crisis  economic_development  hard_times  financial_services  law-firms  Toronto_Life  economics  economic_downturn  professional_service_firms  TMX 
january 2009 by jerryking

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