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jerryking : hard_truths   14

20 Brutal Truths About Life No One Wants to Admit
SEP 7, 2016 | Inc.com | By Matthew Jones.

1. You're going to die and you have no idea when.
Stop pretending that you're invincible. Acknowledge the fact of your own mortality, and then start structuring your life in a more meaningful way.

2. Everyone you love is going to die, and you don't know when.
This truth may be saddening at first, but it also gives you permission to make amends with past difficulties and re-establish meaningful relationships with important figures in your life.

3. Your material wealth won't make you a better or happier person.
Even if you're one of the lucky ones who achieves his or her materialistic dreams, money only amplifies that which was already present.

4. Your obsession with finding happiness is what prevents its attainment.
Happiness is always present in your life--it's just a matter of connecting to it and allowing it to flow through you that's challenging.

5. Donating money does less than donating time.
Giving your time is a way to change your perception and create a memory for yourself and others that will last forever.

6. You can't make everyone happy, and if you try, you'll lose yourself.
Stop trying to please, and start respecting your values, principles, and autonomy.

7. You can't be perfect, and holding yourself to unrealistic standards creates suffering.
Many perfectionists have unrelenting inner critics that are full of so much rage and self-hate that it tears them apart inside. Fight back against that negative voice, amplify your intuition, and start challenging your unrealistic standards.

8. Your thoughts are less important than your feelings and your feelings need acknowledgment.
Intellectually thinking through your problems isn't as helpful as expressing the feelings that create your difficulties in the first place.

9. Your actions speak louder than your words, so you need to hold yourself accountable.
Be responsible and take actions that increase positivity and love.

10. Your achievements and successes won't matter on your death bed.
When your time has come to transition from this reality, you won't be thinking about that raise; you'll be thinking about the relationships you've made--so start acting accordingly.

11. Your talent means nothing without consistent effort and practice.
Some of the most talented people in the world never move out from their parent's basement.

12. Now is the only time that matters, so stop wasting it by ruminating on the past or planning the future.
You can't control the past, and you can't predict the future, and trying to do so only removes you from the one thing you can control--the present.

13. Nobody cares how difficult your life is, and you are the author of your life's story.
Stop looking for people to give you sympathy and start creating the life story you want to read.

14. Your words are more important than your thoughts, so start inspiring people.
Words have the power to oppress, hurt, and shame, but they also have the power to liberate and inspire--start using them more wisely.

15. Investing in yourself isn't selfish. It's the most worthwhile thing you can do.
You have to put on your own gas mask to save the person sitting right next to you.

16. It's not what happens, it's how you react that matters.
Train yourself to respond in a way that leads to better outcomes.

17. You need to improve your relationships to have lasting happiness.
Relationships have a greater impact on your wellbeing and happiness than your income or your occupation, so make sure you give your relationship the attention and work it deserves.

18. Pleasure is temporary and fleeting, so stop chasing fireworks and start building a constellation. Don't settle for an ego boost right now when you can delay gratification and experience deeper fulfillment.

19. Your ambition means nothing without execution--it's time to put in the work.
If you want to change the world, then go out there and do it!

20. Time is your most valuable asset--you need to prioritize how you spend it.
accountability  affirmations  autonomy  consistency  delayed_gratification  efforts  emotional_mastery  execution  good_enough  gut_feelings  happiness  hard_truths  invest_in_yourself  living_in_the_moment  mindfulness  mortality  mybestlife  no_sob_stories  practice  principles  priorities  relationships  serving_others  truth-telling  values  volunteering 
november 2019 by jerryking
Nationalism and the lessons of World War I, 100 years on - The Globe and Mail
Jun. 29 2014

it should be our species’ fervent wish that we acknowledge two fundamental truths to emerge from the First World War.

The first truth is that the leading powers of the day must be cautious about pulling themselves and their allies into escalating conflicts. There is an element in well-armed countries that, energized by either a thirst for blood or a naiveté about the horrors of its shedding, wants to answer every terrorist attack, act of aggression or perceived threat with military-backed ultimatums. This was Austria-Hungary’s response to the assassination of Franz Ferdinand – it now serves as a reminder that an interconnected world, as ours most definitely was in 1914, can back into Armageddon as easily as march into it. World leaders who resist calls for military action aren’t necessarily showing weakness; they may be showing resolve and wisdom.

The second indelible truth is that nationalism, a product of the age in which the war started, is the single greatest threat to peace.
editorials  assassinations  WWI  war  hard_truths  nationalism  lessons_learned  anniversaries  history  Canada  centenaries  threats  ultimatums 
july 2014 by jerryking
Michael Hyatt lays out your plan for success - Western Alumni
May 6, 2014 | Alumni Gazette|by Jason Winders, MES'10.

Shut Up and Listen

No Guarantees
Just because you have a great product, doesn’t mean you are going to make any money.

Play in a Big Sandbox
Go into a big and growing market. When you go into a big and growing market, you can probably get a slice of it – even if you are incompetent. You need a big and growing market, great people and a great product – in that order. Having a great product in a small and shrinking market with OK people, you will always make no money.

Embrace Discomfort
Discomfort, pain and sacrifice actually make the entrepreneurs. Being uncomfortable, being lonely, being misunderstood, everybody looks at the great entrepreneurs and don’t realize the struggle.

Trust No One
Your friends and family, everybody, they will tell you what you have is amazing and you’re so great and, when you bring that product out next year, they are going to buy it. It’s not true. People are trained to give niceties. Go ask all your friends and family for $10,000 to invest in your start-up, then you will find out right away what their problems are.

The Hard Truth
The ride doesn’t necessarily have any good payout....You are not always going to get what you want.

Personal Plan
Live below your means, not at your means. Invest the difference to become wealthy.

Don't Ignore the Basics
(diet, sleep and exercise).
UWO  entrepreneur  alumni  rules_of_the_game  high-growth  frugality  Michael_Hyatt  large_markets  discomforts  personal_cost  personal_sacrifice  hard_truths  personal_enrichment 
may 2014 by jerryking
Hard Things You Need To Do To Be Successful - Business Insider
Jan. 14, 2014

You have to make the call you're afraid to make.
You have to get up earlier than you want to get up.
You have to give more than you get in return right away.
You have to care more about others than they care about you.
You have to fight when you are already injured, bloody, and sore.
You have to feel unsure and insecure when playing it safe seems smarter.
You have to lead when no one else is following you yet.
You have to invest in yourself even though no one else is.
You have to look like a fool while you're looking for answers you don't have.
You have to grind out the details when it's easier to shrug them off.
You have to deliver results when making excuses is an option.
You have to search for your own explanations even when you're told to accept the "facts."
You have to make mistakes and look like an idiot.
You have to try and fail and try again.
You have to run faster even though you're out of breath.
You have to be kind to people who have been cruel to you.
You have to meet deadlines that are unreasonable and deliver results that are unparalleled.
You have to be accountable for your actions even when things go wrong.
You have to keep moving towards where you want to be no matter what's in front of you.
You have to do the hard things. The things that no one else is doing. The things that scare you. The things that make you wonder how much longer you can hold on.

Those are the things that define you. Those are the things that make the difference between living a life of mediocrity or outrageous success.

The hard things are the easiest things to avoid. To excuse away. To pretend like they don't apply to you.

The simple truth about how ordinary people accomplish outrageous feats of success is that they do the hard things that smarter, wealthier, more qualified people don't have the courage — or desperation — to do.

Do the hard things. You might be surprised at how amazing you really are.
affirmations  hard_work  hard_truths  howto  indispensable  invest_in_yourself  It's_up_to_me  JCK  ksfs  next_play  playing_it_safe  self-discipline 
january 2014 by jerryking
A murder that changed Toronto
Oct. 12 2013 | The Globe and Mail | by GAYLE MacDONALD.
Toronto's loss of innocence....Anthony De Sa's new novel, Kicking The Sky, revolves around the murder of 12-year-old Emanuel Jaques and its impact on Toronto's Portuguese community, the city at large and three young boys who decide to search for Emanuel’s body. It is a coming-of-age story about hard truths and loss of innocence.
killings  Toronto  ethnic_communities  '70s  writers  neighbourhoods  Portuguese  coming-of-age  hard_truths 
october 2013 by jerryking
All he is saying is give war a chance: Democracy and world peace are really not such great ideas. Just ask author Robert Kaplan
11 Mar 2000| National Post pg B5 |Alexander Rose.

Whatever else journalist Robert D. Kaplan picked up during his sojourn in the Great Back of Beyond, it wasn't universal love, touch-feely harmony and a We-Are-The-World attitude. In this newspaper last weekend, reviewing The Coming Anarchy -- a collection of his recent assays he was in Canada to promote this week — Misha Glenny aptly remarked: "If you want to feel uplifted about the human condition, you should steer clear of Kaplan's work as a general rule." An example; The way to make this world a better place Kaplan casually proposes in his new collection of essays (named after his famous 1994 article in The Atlantic Monthly predicting cultural clashes, tribal and widespread environmental meltdown), is for Congress to reauthorize assassination as a political instrument to grasp that democracy is not suitable for everyone; and that world peace would actually make war likelier.

"I've spent a great deal of my life covering wars," he says. Moreover, "unlike a lot of journalists, I read -- I read a lot, a lot of history, a lot of philosophy.

Look at Livy (the ancient Roman historian)...'Drew him to classical philosophy. ''If you read the ancient Chinese, or Cicero, Machiavelli or Herodotus, these a strain running through them - which is that if you always think about might go wrong, things might start going right and you can avoid tragedy.'' Thus, ''tragedy is avoidable if you always maintain a sense of it.''

The problem, however, is that "the times we live in are so prosperous for us that it's hard to think tragically." And, most alarmingly, "Revolutions and upheavals happen when things are getting better, not worse."

...When Mr. Kaplan speaks of "realists" he is describing the Hobbesian view that man has a rapacious, brutal, selfish nature. On the world stage, this translates as furiously competing sovereign states battling over their respective interests, many of which are intractable. Realists therefore believe eternal and armed vigilance, not highfalutin UN declarations, are the key to ensuring "human security". ...Kaplan believes that there are three strands of "realism" battle for supremacy...."You don't have to believe in global warming, but we're entering a world in which there will be six billion of us and you have to realize that there are now enough of us living in urbanized conditions that we're occupying zones which are climatically and tectonically fragile. "Now, we've got 70% of the Chinese population producing two-thirds of the industrial output living in flood zones. Forget about Mozambique -- that's a sideshow."...So what advice would he give our Department of Foreign Affairs so that Canada could punch above its weight in the world?

Says Kaplan, without skipping a beat: "It's hard for a country of 30 million to have a pivotal impact. So the way to do it is to get behind an idea everyone knows is smart but nobody has the time or the inclination to push."

Is Foreign Affairs Minister Lloyd Axworthy's position on human rights and human security one such "smart idea"? Mr. Kaplan gives it short shrift (actually, no shrift at all). "It's far too flaccid and formless to be taken seriously because all he's really stating is a kind of easy truth. Tough truths, on the other hand, are things like when and where you intervene and under what circumstances.

"So, I would say Canada needs to go on fast forward to a Global Constabulary Force. NATO, with all its problems, worked well in Kosovo and Bosnia. So, we [i.e., Canada] will create an out-of-area military branch of NATO with some non-European members -- such as Japan, Australia, India, Brazil -- to form the core of the GCF." Then "we'll have a wider range of options during the next Rwanda, or next time something happens in a place with no strategic interest to anyone but where there's an overwhelming sense that we should 'do something.' But just talking about human security ... The minute you have something that everyone agrees with you know it's useless."

A lesson from the master himself.
floodplains  Greek  hard_choices  hard_power  hard_questions  hard_truths  history  human_rights  human_security  journalists  middle-powers  Niccolò_Machiavelli  political_theory  punch-above-its-weight  rapaciousness  realism  realpolitik  Robert_Kaplan  Romans  thinking_tragically  the_human_condition  world_stage  worst-case 
july 2012 by jerryking
Soft Power, Hard Truths - WSJ.com
February 22, 2005 | WSJ |By VICTOR DAVIS HANSON
soft_power  hard_truths 
june 2012 by jerryking
60 Stern Truths For Entrepreneurs
2004 Philip Stern @ pstern@sternthinking.com or 416.588.0000

* No one really cares like you care.
* Know strategy. Think strategy. Do strategy.
* Nourish your attitude.
* Your work is delivered with your mouth and your typing finger(s).
* Make enemies carefully.
* Respect fashion. Respect stupidity.
* Learn to converse. Learn to sell
* Sales and marketing are different skills and are rarely both mastered by one person.
* Ration your time.
* Assemble a small Board and listen to them!
* Don’t be smarter than the trends.
* Solutions must really solve an identifiable, painful problem. Build and sell solutions.
* Invest in validation.
* Design validation in. Respect the Chasm.
* Only lunatics attempt to create new categories.
* Always have sex before the big game and never have sex before the big game.
* Seek a segment that you can capture within a market that's big.
* Prepare for war. Competition and rivalry both have their place. Parlez vous "elevator speech"?
* Get serious. regular exercise.
* Compelling means COMPELLING!
* Cash is [insert name of favoured deity].
* Ask a few absolutely trustworthy friends to be regularly available and brutal. Document it. when relevant. get it signed.
* Build and maintain a sane filing system.
* Your lawyer will be delighted to run your business for S375/hr.
* Out of the room: out of the deal,
* Consistency is valuable: success is better.
* Do what you know.
* Drive people to perform: jointly set goals, invest time to track progress. and think like a coach. Revel in cheapness. Band-Aids are sometimes the right response. Brand it.”
* Pick a supportive partner.
* Rehearse. Rehearse. Rehearse.
* At minimum; Plans are nothing; planning is everything.
* However you can, link your ego to success. Underpromise (by a little) and overdeliver (by a little).
* Optimism is a great attitude but a counterproductive prediction device.
* Your Business Plan is about identifying and exploiting opportunity/ies.
* Highly successful people are often lousy advisors.
* Fix your substance abuse now. Learn to negotiate.
* Tell the hard truth in a clear but gentle way.
* Set limits.
* Set standards.
* Learn and practice structured interviewing when you hire.
* You can compensate for lack of focus by using immense force.
* Say thank-you. Human motivations are largely unconsciousness
* No one really cares like you care.
* Don't mortgage your home.
entrepreneurship  start_ups  small_business  tips  lessons_learned  affirmations  hard_truths  It's_up_to_me  new_categories  social_norms  rehearsals 
march 2012 by jerryking
Some Truths About Black Disadvantage - WSJ.com
JANUARY 3, 2005 | WSJ | By AMY L. WAX.

A central tenet of the law of remedies is that someone who harms another person -- the wrongdoer -- must undo that harm. Justice requires that the culprit right the wrong by restoring the victim to his rightful position -- the state he would have enjoyed had he never been wronged. In distinguishing between liability and remedy -- between causing harm and undoing harm -- the law also recognizes that reality can fall short of the ideal. The wrongdoer may quite literally lack the power to make the victim whole. The assailant cannot replace the eye he has destroyed. The murderer cannot bring the dead to life. Full justice for the victim may simply be out of reach.
reparations  African-Americans  disadvantages  Bill_Cosby  racism  Amy_Wax  hard_truths 
november 2011 by jerryking
Nine hard truths
September 2005 | PROFIT magazine | By Rick Spence. The
immutable laws of being your own boss, and five ways to transcend them
all. 1. the 40-hr. workweek is not your friend. 2. Everyone is looking
for something new. But no one has any money for anything new. 3. All
the people you meet at a networking function are trying to sell you
something; 4. The phone doesn't ring by itself--make your own calls if
you want the phone to ring. 5. At any given time, everyone you want to
contact is in a meeting. 6. Basic courtesy is deader than Sir John A.
Macdonald. No one returns phone calls anymore. 7. Allies are like
employees: hard to find, hard to live without. 8. Opportunities are all
around you, but differentiating between an "opportunity" and a genuine
source of revenue-that's hard. 9. Most of the people you meet at large
corps. dream of working for themselves. KSFs: 1. Know what your market
wants. 2. Get yourself a peer group. 3. Trust in karma. 4. Be brave. 5.
Give it away.
motivations  inspiration  Rick_Spence  rules_of_the_game  ksfs  pay_it_forward  self-employment  owners  entrepreneurship  opportunities  karma  Sir_John_A._Macdonald  revenue_generation  interpretation  second-order  hard_to_find  courtesies  hard_truths  it's_up_to_me 
february 2010 by jerryking
The Hard Truth
October 2005 | TORO Magazine | by Bebe O'Shea who interviews Kim Cattral of Sex in the City fame.
relationships  Claudia_Dey  hard_truths 
february 2010 by jerryking
Canada, a nation given to fanciful flights from reality - The Globe and Mail
May. 25, 2009 | Globe and Mail | Daniel F. Muzyka. Lays out
his "realities" for dealing with Canada's political-economic challenges.
(1) Business creates wealth, government redistributes it. (2) Markets are a powerful force. (3) Capital moves. (4) Risk has two sides. humans have all kinds of decision biases around risk. We need to recognize that there may be a "risk/return" relationship in that the average expectation is to realize a certain return given a level of riskiness in our investments. However, there are no guarantees. (5) Structural problems are just
that. If we don't deal with problems because they just aren't painful enough in better times, they will come back to haunt us in the next downturn - only worse. (6) Externalities come back to haunt. (7) Subsidies are bad and
become addictive. (8) Bailouts are no free lunch. (9) It is what you negotiate and what you are worth. Add enough value to justify your wage rates (10) Value added and productivity are the keys to success....Create more value than others and do it more productively...govts. that provide social, health and educational services should be asking questions about how productive their service delivery is, not just how much they are investing in it. (11) Innovate or wither. Propping up what exists - or worse, what existed - for the sake of maintaining the status quo, especially with subsidies, is a road to defeat....focus on research and innovation,
bailouts  Canada  Canadians  capital_flows  delusions  Daniel_Muzyka  externalities  hard_truths  innovation  interconnections  negotiations  productivity  realities  regulations  risks  rules_of_the_game  self-worth  subsidies  value_added  wishful_thinking 
may 2009 by jerryking

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