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jerryking : hardships   9

What Drives Success? - NYTimes.com
JAN. 25, 2014 | NYT | By AMY CHUA and JED RUBENFELD.

the strikingly successful groups in America today share three traits that, together, propel success. The first is a superiority complex — a deep-seated belief in their exceptionality. The second appears to be the opposite — insecurity, a feeling that you or what you’ve done is not good enough. The third is impulse control.

Any individual, from any background, can have what we call this Triple Package of traits. But research shows that some groups are instilling them more frequently than others, and that they are enjoying greater success.

It’s odd to think of people feeling simultaneously superior and insecure. Yet it’s precisely this unstable combination that generates drive: a chip on the shoulder, a goading need to prove oneself. Add impulse control — the ability to resist temptation — and the result is people who systematically sacrifice present gratification in pursuit of future attainment.

Ironically, each element of the Triple Package violates a core tenet of contemporary American thinking....The same factors that cause poverty — discrimination, prejudice, shrinking opportunity — can sap from a group the cultural forces that propel success. Once that happens, poverty becomes more entrenched. In these circumstances, it takes much more grit, more drive and perhaps a more exceptional individual to break out.
brainpower  willpower  poverty  movingonup  Amy_Chua  Mormons  ethnic_communities  immigrants  ksfs  self-discipline  perseverance  achievement_gaps  paranoia  Sonia_Sotomayor  overachievers  sacrifice  delayed_gratification  impulse_control  insecurity  exceptionality  superiority_complex  dual-consciousness  cultural_values  hardships 
january 2014 by jerryking
Trading with China: The Reality
Winter 2000| Directors and Boards | William Wurster

How to go about setting up a business in China -- without taking too many hits in the process.

ALMOST 150 YEARS AGO in California, and about 100 years ago in Alaska, the discovery of gold lured thousands to seek fortunes that seemed all but certain. Ultimately, of course, the only certainty was hardship. Very few of the adventurous prospectors ever got rich. Today, similar get-rich-quick illusions have inspired a rush to invest in China, and for many it may well end in disappointment and defeat.
China  boards_&_directors_&_governance  market_entry  guangxi  hardships 
january 2013 by jerryking
Nine key traits to make the shift from failure to success - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER

Special to The Globe and Mail

Published Tuesday, Oct. 09 2012

1. Rebounders accept failure: They hate to fail, but they accept it, and try to fail productively, learning from the experience, as the inventive Thomas Edison did with his many failed experiments.

2. Rebounders compartmentalize options: They are often emotional people, with drive and passion. John Bogle, who founded Vanguard Group, was furious when he was pushed out of a previous job and even had revenge fantasies. But he didn’t spend time trying to get even. Rebounders control the emotional fallout of their struggle (i.e. emotional mastery).

3. Rebounders have a bias toward action: After Tammy Duckworth lost both legs when her U.S. military helicopter was shot down in Iraq, her first impulse was to get to work at rehabilitation and her new life. Rebounders keep pushing, keep doing.

4. Rebounders change their minds: They can discard old thinking, give up on long-held dreams, and adjust their ambitions to evolving situations. They don’t cling to ideas that are proving hopeless.

5. Rebounders prepare for things to go wrong: They don’t expect things to go their own way. They are cautious optimists, always aware their plans may go awry.

6. Rebounders are comfortable with discomfort: They are willing to accept hardships and inconveniences as long as they feel they are getting closer to their goal. Singer/songwriter Lucinda Williams could have signed a major recording deal years earlier if she had agreed to make the songs the music companies wanted, but she stayed true to her own vision, even if it meant often barely having the money to pay her rent.

7. Rebounders are willing to wait: They are determined to succeed on their own terms, and can accept that it might take a long time. “But rebounders don’t just wait positively for a lucky break, or do the same thing over and over. They constantly learn and get better, continually improving the likelihood of success until the odds tilt in their favour,” Mr. Newman observes.

8. Rebounders have heroes: Many of the rebounders he met are romantics, seeing their role as in some way historic, and they are entranced by some mentor or historical figure who they want to emulate. Vanguard’s Mr. Bogle, for example, often alluded to the naval battles of Admiral Lord Nelson and named his mutual fund company after his hero’s ship.

9. Rebounders have more than passion: We are told we need passion for success, but rebounders realize it requires more than that. They have a special drive and resilience that allows them to capitalize on their passion.
bouncing_back  resilience  Harvey_Schachter  emotional_mastery  personality_types/traits  ksfs  long-term  patience  preparation  contingency_planning  reflections  self-analysis  self-awareness  thinking_tragically  discomforts  strategic_patience  adaptability  inconveniences  passions  heroes  pragmatism  compartmentalization  action-oriented  hardships  next_play 
october 2012 by jerryking
THE PROPERTY REPORT: Malls Make Room for Start-Ups - WSJ.com
AUGUST 3, 2011, 12:40 A.M. ET
By A.D. PRUITT

Mall owners trying to keep their space filled amid the economic downturn
have found an unexpected source of relief: demand from newly minted
retailers.

With the unemployment rate persistently high, people suffering from lost
jobs, foreclosures and other hardships are turning to selling such
merchandise as jewelry, calendars, sunglasses or seasonal fare for
Christmas and Halloween. During the boom years, many mall landlords had
little incentive to take chances by providing these start-ups with
space.

But mall owners have become more willing to lease kiosks, carts and even
empty stores to these entrepreneurs of necessity. So-called specialty
products now make up one of the fastest-growing segments of the retail
industry, (reference John Corless)
shopping_malls  kiosks  pop-ups  retailers  economic_downturn  start_ups  hardships 
august 2011 by jerryking
Three R’s for Extreme Longevity - NYTimes.com
October 18, 2010 | New York Times | By JANE E. BRODY. What
is the secret to longevity ? Genes do play a role in longevity. Tthree
critical attributes that might be dubbed longevity’s version of the
three R’s: resolution, resourcefulness and resilience. Taking hardships
in stride, traipsing blithely over obstacles--converting many into
building blocks....adhering to a regimen of a careful diet, hard work,
regular exercise and a very long list of community service...raising
children.

Like many if not most other centenarians, according to the findings of
the New England Centenarian Study at Boston University, Mrs. Tuttle is
an extrovert who has many friends, a healthy dose of self-esteem and
strong ties to family and community. She continues to enjoy her youthful
passions for the theater and opera.
longevity  aging  centenarians  tips  resilience  grit  resolve  discipline  hard_work  hardships  exercise 
october 2010 by jerryking
The Role Of Abundance In Innovation | Techdirt
May 29th 2009 | Techdirt | by Mike Masnick

abundance, innovation, invention, patents

Permalink.
The Role Of Abundance In Innovation
from the it-increases-it... dept

A few weeks back, Dennis wrote about a recent Malcolm Gladwell article
in the New Yorker about innovation, but I was just shown another article
from the same issue, by Adam Gropnik, which may be even more
interesting. Gopnik points to evidence challenging the idea that
"necessity is the mother of invention," by noting that more innovation
seems to occur in times of abundance, rather than times of hardship. The idea is that in times of hardship you're just focused on getting through the day. You don't have time to experiment and try to improve things -- you make do with what you have. It's in times of plenty that people finally have time to mess around and experiment, invent and then innovate.
abundance  innovation  scarcity  patents  Mike_Masnick  inventions  constraints  hardships 
july 2009 by jerryking
'There will be blood'
February 24, 2009 G&M interview by HEATHER SCOFFIELD of
Harvard financial guru Niall Ferguson who predicts prolonged financial
hardship, even civil war, before the 'Great Recession' ends
gurus  History  financial  crisis  economics  politicaleconomy  globalization  Niall_Ferguson  financial_history  recessions  economists  hardships 
february 2009 by jerryking
A+ for cultural capital
Jun. 27, 2006 G&M op-ed by Margaret Wente on immigrant
students in Toronto … fully 43% of Toronto’s secondary school students
were born outside Canada. For all the hardships faced by new immigrants
to Canada, many of their kids are the brightest of the bright. And they
also make up a disproportionate share of dropouts. It appears that how
well these students do in school has far more to do with where they’re
from than how long they’ve been here...The education system is supposed
to be the great equalizer. So what can the schools do about these
achievement gaps? People in Toronto are discussing all the usual stuff
-- a more inclusive curriculum, more ethnic teachers, more outreach to
families, more rejection of ethnic stereotypes, and, of course, an end
to discrimination. But the education system's ability to equalize the
outcomes is probably severely limited. That's because cultural capital
is formed at home and formed early.
achievement_gaps  high_schools  performance  Toronto  Margaret_Wente  schools  immigrants  TDSB  school_districts  dropouts  disproportionality  education  outcomes  cultural_capital  hardships 
january 2009 by jerryking

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