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jerryking : head_offices   17

Canada’s missed opportunity: Pot industry now being run out of the U.S.
JULY 3, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | by ANDREW WILLIS.

With Bruce Linton’s firing, it’s now all too clear that the biggest companies in Canadian cannabis are run out of New York and the state of Washington. An industry that this country seemed destined to lead when the federal Liberals legalized recreational cannabis last October 2018, is increasingly dominated by foreigners. ...... The opportunity to create global cannabis champions, based in Canada, appears to be vanishing. There should be a conversation around that issue, in political and business circles, before the biggest head offices all disappear... Linton ...lost his job because his visionary approach for Canopy Growth Corp. didn’t fit with the predictable, quarter-by-quarter profits demanded by Constellation Brands Inc....Linton’s departure is similar to what has played out at many startups that get sold to multinational companies. .....Even when we brought Constellation's $5-billion in, I knew, from that change of structure, there would likely be implications for management, but it was the right thing to do for the company.”... our entrepreneurs tend to sell successful startups at a relatively early stage, compared to jurisdictions such as the U.S. and Asia. . The trend, now happening even more rapidly in the cannabis sector, cuts into the potential future prosperity of this country......a study last year from the Washington-based Brookings Institution and the Martin Prosperity Institute at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Business – scaling up successful domestic businesses is essential to creating wealth and producing the next generation of corporate leaders. Canadians need to do better at turning their own companies into global champions. Silicon Valley generates enormous wealth out of a vibrant tech community. Why can’t Leamington, Ont., or Nanaimo, B.C., aspire to do the same in cannabis?..Canadian cannabis companies were created by government policy..... federal and provincial regulators granted the licences needed to grow and distribute their products – and local capital markets were receptive to financing them...CEOs, boards and domestic politicians should be asking if the country is best served by a laissez-faire approach to cannabis that created vibrant, valuable businesses following legalization in 2018, then quickly began handing over control of the sector....
Andrew_Willis  Bay_Street  Brookings  cannabis  Canopy_Growth  CEOs  Constellation_Brands  crossborder  departures  firings  global_champions  head_offices  home_grown  industrial_policies  Martin_Prosperity_Institute  missed_opportunities  sellout_culture 
july 2019 by jerryking
SNC-Lavalin’s probable exodus from Canada is a national shame
MARCH 29, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | by ERIC REGULY EUROPEAN BUREAU CHIEF
LONDON.

Head offices abandon Canada in two ways – slowly or abruptly.

The slow approach sees the head office, usually after a foreign takeover, gradually lose relevance, to the point it becomes a branch plant and simply fades from view over several years. The abrupt approach, again usually after a foreign takeover, sees the head office vanish virtually overnight, as Falconbridge did a decade ago after it was snapped up by mining giant Xstrata. SNC-Lavalin Group Inc. has been slowly disappearing from Canada for years. That’s mostly SNC’s fault – it hasn’t won enough work to keep its Canadian headcount intact......SNC’s departure would come as a serious blow to Canada Inc. Since the middle part of the past decade, Canada has lost dozens of head offices as Canadian investors lunged at the prospect of fat takeover premiums. Many, perhaps most, of the foreign companies doing the buying promised to keep the Canadian head office intact. But those assurances proved to be either wildly exaggerated or outright lies.

Among the head offices that have disappeared are Alcan, Dofasco, Inco, Molson and a chunk of the Canadian oil industry. Recently, Goldcorp Inc., Canada’s second-biggest gold producer, accepted a takeover offer from Colorado’s Newmont Mining Corp., meaning that Goldcorp’s Vancouver office faces a serious downgrade.

Aside from the loss of stock market listings, the elimination of large head offices rots the country’s social fabric. Head offices provide high-paying, high-skilled jobs and create an ecosystem of spinoff jobs, from accountants and chefs to limo drivers and lawyers. Head offices bolster the financial services industry, which underwrites the bond and equity offerings and sponsors the arts and charities. When corporate headquarters disappear, so does talent.
Eric_Reguly  exodus  head_offices  sellout_culture  SNC-Lavalin  social_fabric 
march 2019 by jerryking
Another one bites the dust: Goldcorp sale a further example of the hollowing out of Corporate Canada - The Globe and Mail
ERIC REGULY EUROPEAN BUREAU CHIEF
ROME
PUBLISHED JANUARY 14, 2019

Toronto’s Barrick Gold Corp. always wanted to team up with Newmont Mining Corp. of Colorado. Merging the two giants, which have adjoining operations in gold-rich Nevada, would have created an unassailable industry leader and reduced costs by an estimated US$1-billion a year. On paper, it looked like a dream deal. But it never got off the ground, in good part because Barrick founder Peter Munk wanted the new company to stay in Toronto, not move to Denver.

Were he alive today, Mr. Munk – a Canadian patriot who believed in the value of head offices – would be distraught. In the fall, Barrick bought Randgold Resources but handed management control to Randgold’s executives, who promptly gutted Barrick’s Toronto headquarters, leaving the world’s top producer with a mere 65 employees in its echo-chamber offices on Bay Street. The deal was, in effect, a reverse takeover. The new Barrick will be run from the Channel Islands........Toronto still fancies itself the mining capital of the world, a bold claim given that it is now largely devoid of A-team and even B-team players. Barrick was the last miner in Canada that could be considered world class, and it’s fading from view as a Canadian company. All the big base-metal names are gone, bar Teck Resources. Goldcorp is going. Who’s next? Could it be the well-regarded Agnico Eagle Mines (market value $12.4-billion) or B2Gold ($3.7-billion)?

Aside from the loss of their Toronto stock-market listings, the endless elimination of head offices across Canada rots the country’s social fabric. Head offices provide high-paying, high-skilled job opportunities and create an ecosystem of spinoff jobs, from accountants and chefs to limo drivers and lawyers. Head offices bolster the financial-services industry, which underwrites bond and equity sales and sponsors the arts and charities. When head offices disappear, so does talent. If you want a top-level management job in mining, an industry that shaped Canada, forget Toronto. Today, the opportunities are in London, Johannesburg and Melbourne...........In a largely open economy such as Canada’s (banks, big telecoms and media companies are still protected from foreign takeovers), it’s hard to stop head offices from disappearing. The cult of shareholder capitalism produces unsentimental results, such as the eradication of underperforming companies. But Canadian investors and managers have proven time after time that they’re happier to sell rather than build, happy to take a quick buck rather than take a long-term gamble on a double or triple. The cost of doing so is a hollowed-out corporate sector – a branch-plant economy.
Barrick  Corporate_Canada  Eric_Reguly  Goldcorp  head_offices  hollowing_out  Peter_Munk  sellout_culture  social_fabric 
january 2019 by jerryking
The gutting of Barrick Gold – it didn’t have to be this way - The Globe and Mail
ERIC REGULY EUROPEAN BUREAU CHIEF
ROME
PUBLISHED JANUARY 4, 2019

Most big companies Eric Reguly followed – Inco, Falconbridge, Alcan, Dofasco, Molson, Fairmont, Four Seasons, among others – were flogged to foreigners, their head offices downgraded to branch plants or eliminated. ....Canadians were sellers, not builders.....If there was one company that was safe from the takeover onslaught, it was Barrick Gold, I thought......At the time, Barrick was run by its founder, Peter Munk, the Hungarian-born Canadian patriot who wanted to build the world’s biggest gold miner. After achieving that goal, he mused about creating a diversified resources giant, the equivalent of a BHP Billiton or Rio Tinto under the Maple Leaf. But he was too late: By the time he was ready to put the pieces together, in the middle part of the previous decade, all his potential targets, including Inco, had been plucked clean from the Toronto stock market.....
Eric_Reguly  branch_plants  head_offices  hollowing_out  John_Thornton  large_companies  LSE  mining  Peter_Munk  Pierre_Lassonde  sellout_culture  TMX  Barrick  Corporate_Canada 
january 2019 by jerryking
Dyson shifts HQ to Singapore to focus on cars
January 23, 2019 | Financial Times Michael Pooler and Peter Campbell in London and Stefania Palma in Hong Kong.

Move by billionaire’s business reflects strategy to be closer to customers and manufacturing centres....James Dyson’s decision to move his business headquarters to the other side of the world struck an odd note.

The switch to Singapore comes at a crucial juncture for his company, which is seeking to evolve from a household appliance brand to a manufacturer of electric vehicles. It is nothing short of his greatest gamble, which could secure his legacy or risk his fortune.....Dyson said it was simply for commercial reasons because most of its customers and all its manufacturing operations are in Asia, and to give management supervision over the construction of a car factory in Singapore that will be its largest investment to date......“This is to do with making sure we future-proof [the company],”......“What we’ve seen in the last few years is an acceleration of opportunities to grow from a revenue perspective in Asia.”......Dyson CEO, Jim Rowan insisted that the HQ move was not a bad omen for the UK, where Dyson ceased manufacturing in 2003, and pledged it would enlarge its 4,800-strong workforce there. “We’ll continue to invest in the UK,” said Mr Rowan, pointing out a proposed £350m expansion to one of two research and development centres in Wiltshire, south-west England, for autonomous vehicle testing.......far more likely that the move is linked to Dyson’s latest, and boldest, venture — its £2bn drive to break into the automotive arena. It has developed a UK site to test the vehicles, but also plans to expand its Singaporean research and development facilities, a sign that future vehicle work will take place closer to the manufacturing sites.....The company spreads its intellectual property around the globe, with about 1,500 of its 5,000 patents registered in the UK, according to data from patent research group Cipher. “Clearly if you have new business like cars that will generate significant IP,”.....A Dyson spokesman said the company had no intention of moving its current UK patents to Singapore.
Asia  automotive_industry  autonomous_vehicles  Brexit  Dyson  electric_cars  engineering  future-proofing  head_offices  intellectual_property  James_Dyson  manufacturers  patents  relocation  Singapore 
january 2019 by jerryking
Inside the brutal transformation of Tim Hortons - The Globe and Mail
MARINA STRAUSS
THE GLOBE AND MAIL
LAST UPDATED: WEDNESDAY, FEB. 22, 2017

Since taking over the iconic chain in 2014, its new Brazilian owner, 3G Capital, has purged head office, slashed costs and squeezed suppliers. Shareholders are happy, but is 3G tearing the heart out of Timmy’s?.....3G is regarded as ultra-disciplined owners who are sticking to the same playbook they have followed at companies including Burger King, Anheuser-Busch, Kraft Foods and Heinz: massive layoffs, replacing legacy managers with hungry youngsters and, above all, a fanatical devotion to financial benchmarks and cost-cutting. (It remains to be seen whether this will also be the approach for RBI’s latest acquisition, Popeyes Louisiana Kitchen.)....Will 3G's analytics-driven overhaul of Tim Hortons—using the same template the private equity firm’s founders have deployed at railroads, brewers and food makers—succeed in the long run, or is it in danger of cutting the heart out of a Canadian icon? ......Suppliers are also feeling the squeeze. From the get-go, RBI made it clear it would be reviewing vendor relationships. And the company pushed for better terms, including extensions on bill payments to as much as 120 days from 30 days or less. Maple Leaf Foods, a major partner that supplied meat to Tim Hortons, declined to accept the new terms, and walked away....
Former employees also say RBI has cut back on product research and development spending at Tim Hortons, offloading some of that work to suppliers. That’s not uncommon in the fast-food world, but it can be risky. “Suppliers can do a great job with innovating and R&D, but you’re limited to what the supplier is trying to develop,” ......3G has never encountered a brand quite like Tim Hortons. It isn’t just another coffee company. It is a Canadian destination, an integral part of many Canadians’ day and a brand that defines us, to some degree, around the world.......“The risk, in looking at Tim Hortons through the lens of efficiency alone, is to miss the greatest value of the asset, and that is the Tim’s brand and its deep connection to the fabric of the country,” says Joe Jackman, founder of strategic retail consultant Jackman Reinvents, whose clients have included Old Navy, Hertz, Rexall and FreshCo. “You can’t cost-cut your way to retail nirvana.”
3G_Capital  brands  Canadiana  coffee  community_support  cost-cutting  cultural_touchpoints  data_driven  downsizing  efficiencies  fast-food  franchising  goodwill  head_offices  iconic  JWT  layoffs  Maple_Leaf_Foods  Marina_Strauss  organizational_culture  playbooks  private_equity  R&D  RBI  restructurings  staying_hungry  supply_chains  supply_chain_squeeze  Tim_Hortons  transformational  walking_away 
february 2017 by jerryking
Canada must fill three gaps to reach its high-growth future - The Globe and Mail
VICTOR DODIG
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Nov. 27, 2015

While Canada is roundly – and rightly – envied for its solid economy and how it withstood the financial crisis, we have three gaps to fill if we are going to continue to prosper and be leaders among the advanced economies.

First, I believe we need to do a better job of building the intellectual capital and skills necessary to fuel innovation and execute in a modern economy.

Second, we need to ensure our innovative entrepreneurs are able to attract both the formation and sustainability capital necessary to commercialize new ideas into valuable products and services.

Third, we need to ensure that we build an innovative ecosystem that effectively encourages and nurtures that development......Actually, some troubling issues lie behind those positive numbers:

* We have a much lower proportion of graduates in the all-important STEM sectors – science, technology, engineering and mathematics – than 22 other OECD countries.
* Only about 20 per cent of our graduates are from those disciplines.
* Postsecondary graduates rank 19th of 21 in numeracy, 18th of 21 in literacy and 14th of 18 in problem-solving skills.

We’re talking about the very people and very skills we need to need to lead Canada in innovation and create the high-value jobs for the future.

In effect, a postsecondary education is simply not enough in today’s modern economy. Our students, by and large, are choosing an educational path geared toward acquiring credentials rather than skills acquisition and what the labour market needs.

So, what do we need to do?....
(1) promote education choices that match the needs of the job market.
(2) promote policies and models to support emerging industries that focus on creating solutions in the global supply chain as opposed to just building products.

Canadians are no strangers to discovery and innovation, but today’s innovation ecosystem is highly complex. Far too many Canadian high-tech startups get bought out before they have a chance to grow. They often sell out before attaining their true potential.

When small and mid-sized startups are sold, the country is weaker for it.

Why? Because the really smart innovators never stop. After a successful sale, many are back the next day looking for the next opportunity and dreaming of the next big discovery. And retaining highly paid head-office jobs in Canada rather than seeing them farmed out elsewhere will help spread those benefits to the broader economy.
Canada  Canadian  future  CIBC  CEOs  high-growth  innovation  innovation_policies  policy  labour_markets  start_ups  sellout_culture  STEM  intellectual_capital  think_threes  smart_people  overambitious  policymaking  head_offices  ecosystems  digital_economy  Victor_Dodig 
may 2016 by jerryking
Run on the firm may signal Heenan’s demise
BRIAN MILNER
Run on the firm may signal Heenan’s demise Add to ...
Subscribers Only

The Globe and Mail

It’s a fate that awaits other mid-level law firms whose business model is no longer working in a rapidly changing environment. Firms like Heenan Blaikie are being squeezed mercilessly both from above and below – by the heavyweights chasing after business they once ignored as unworthy of their lofty status, and by more nimble specialist firms with lower expenses (including less lavish offices) and cheaper fees.

Like accounting firms and investment banks, law firms are also facing the long-predicted downdrafts emanating from the hollowing out of corporate Canada. As Canadian subsidiaries have ceded greater control to their foreign owners, a chunk of their financial and legal business in Canada has migrated to head offices in other countries.

Published Tuesday, Feb. 04 2014
law_firms  Bay_Street  dissolutions  Heenan_Blaikie  winner-take-all  head_offices  hollowing_out  boutiques  specialists  mid-sized  rapid_change  barbell_effect  Corporate_Canada  mercilessness 
february 2014 by jerryking
Loblaw reducing work force by 275 employees - The Globe and Mail
Marina Strauss - Retailing Reporter

The Globe and Mail

Published Wednesday, Oct. 16 2013

Loblaw Cos. Ltd. is going through another round of job cuts as it races to bolster its operations in the face of intensifying competition.

The country’s largest grocer is reducing its staff of about 134,000 full-time and part-time employees by 275 people, mostly management and administration positions, spokesman Bob Chant confirmed on Wednesday morning. Just over 200 of the cuts are from Loblaw’s Brampton, Ont., head office with “minimal impact at the store level.”
head_offices  Loblaws  layoffs  Marina_Strauss  grocery  supermarkets 
october 2013 by jerryking
The decline and fall of Canada’s global corporate superstars - The Globe and Mail
Aug. 16 2013 | The Globe and Mail | Eric Reguly.

Here’s a depressing exercise: Scan the upper reaches of the Top 1000 companies in the July-August issue of Report on Business magazine and try to spot Canada’s global winners.

You could call them Canada’s corporate ambassadors, if they existed.

The short list is exceedingly short:
...Why does Canada, a Group of Seven country that encourages open markets, celebrates innovation and risk-taking, pumps fortunes into R&D, votes in business-friendly governments, is blessed with skilled workers and globally competitive tax rates and sits on the doorstep of the world’s largest market produce so pathetically few global corporate superstars?....It can take decades, a century even, to build a company like Inco or Dofasco. Don Argus, the former chairman of BHP Billiton of Australia, the world’s largest mining group, was right to denounce Canada’s sellout culture. “Canada has lost more head offices than any other country,” he said in 2008, at the height of the resources’ buying and selling spree. “Canada has already been reduced to an industry branch office and is largely irrelevant to the global mining stage.”

Of course, BlackBerry doesn’t really play into the hollowing out story. In retrospect, it should have foisted itself on Microsoft, Nokia or Amazon shortly after it became apparent to investors and tech geeks, if not to the deluded executives at BlackBerry itself, that the iPhone was here to stay. BlackBerry’s value destruction since then has been awe-inspiring. Mr. Lazaridis and Mr. Balsillie were superb entrepreneurs, but failed at keeping the company competitive.

So why does Canada lack global champions? Don’t blame government policies. Blame the sellout culture, nice-guy directors with a propensity to protect the wrong executives at the wrong time and Canada’s classic lack of corporate self-confidence. The upshot is a country that turned into a one-trick pony – oil sands – with a few decent, protected banks and insurers at its side. If Switzerland, the Netherlands and Sweden can churn out global champions, Canada should be able to at least double the rate. The next BlackBerry is not just around the corner.
Blackberry  boards_&_directors_&_governance  brands  branch_plants  competitiveness_of_nations  decline  Eric_Reguly  G-7  global_champions  head_offices  hollowing_out  large_companies  multinationals  oil_sands  sellout_culture  superstars  value_destruction 
august 2013 by jerryking
Sears joins retail’s real estate push
Jun. 04 2013 | The Globe and Mail | MARINA STRAUSS - RETAILING REPORTER.

“Everyone is milking their real estate,” said Jack Klaiman, president at retail real estate adviser Oberfeld Snowcap. “This is the hidden asset. … It’s a smart move.”.... “Real estate has always been a valuable aspect of many businesses, particularly in retail,” he added. “This is the right development opportunity for us to pursue.”

Real estate is a hot commodity in retail as a growing array of foreign retailers look for sites here amid a dearth of locations. Retailers, including Nordstrom, are believed to be interested in some Sears sites, especially its flagship store at the Toronto Eaton Centre, where its head office also is located.
head_offices  commercial_real_estate  real_estate  Marina_Strauss  REITS  retailers  Loblaws  Canadian_Tire  hidden  Sears_Canada 
june 2013 by jerryking
Tesco's US venture ain't-so-Fresh-&-Easy after £1bn write-down
08 April 2013 | Management Today | By Michael Northcott.

Tesco has invested about £1 billion in the U.S. since 2007, targeting the West Coast with neighborhood urban stores in a market dominated by big-box supermarkets, said Bloomberg. In all it has opened 200 stores, focused on budget-priced, healthy food and own- brand items, employing 5000 people.

Apart from store disposals, the sale of the Riverside, California, distribution centre and three adjacent food factories, the closure of the Los Angeles head office and associated redundancy costs are all part of the equation.
head_offices  Tesco  strategy  food  supermarkets  write-downs  grocery  retailers  convenience_stores 
april 2013 by jerryking
Loblaw to cut 700 head office jobs - The Globe and Mail
BERT MAROTTE

The Globe and Mail

Published Tuesday, Oct. 16 2012,
head_offices  Loblaws  layoffs 
october 2012 by jerryking
The head-office exodus - The Globe and Mail
Jun. 29 2012 | The Globe and Mail | ERIC REGULY.

Gord Nixon stated that “we should be asking why so many of our industry leaders are being consolidated, rather than doing the consolidating; why we are losing head offices at such an alarming rate; and what is the cost?”...Hollowing out has turned Canadians into bit players in industries that we used to dominate, or where we at least had a seat at the table....Why are Canadians so keen to sell? Lack of confidence is a good place to start. For decades, Canadian companies had capital handed to them, first by the British, then by the Americans. Now that CEOs face a global fight for capital, many of them seem to be taking the easy way out and selling to, rather than competing with, big-name rivals.

Greed is surely another reason. Canadian investors adore instant gratification, even if it means giving up a long-term growth play....All hope is not gone. We’ve lost head offices in mining, beer, steel and other businesses, but there is an industry where Canada has a chance to become a world-beater: agriculture. We have land, water, technology, potash-based fertilizer and infrastructure, such as rail and ports. Another two billion people will have to be fed by 2050. Canada should, and could, build its own Glencore, Archer Daniels Midland, Cargill or Monsanto.

Oops! We’ve now agreed to sell Viterra and its irreplaceable grain elevators, to Glencore.
Eric_Reguly  exodus  mining  mergers_&_acquisitions  Glencore  agriculture  hollowing_out  Strata  sellout_culture  global_champions  Viterra  head_offices 
june 2012 by jerryking
George Gosbee: Patriotism that's more than skin-deep - The Globe and Mail
gordon pitts
From Saturday's Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Dec. 02, 2011

Mr. Gosbee’s patriotism is buttressed by the conviction that Calgary is emerging as an energy finance and head office capital – while tempered with regret that, in the process, city and province may be losing their vaunted entrepreneurial spirit.
Gordon_Pitts  investment_banking  TMX  Alberta  Calgary  moguls  patriotism  George_Gosbee  AltaCorp  head_offices 
january 2012 by jerryking
Canadians must think beyond the U.S. market
Mar. 06, 2010 | Globe and Mail | Jeffrey Simpson. The U.S.
is burdening itself with debt, postponing days of fiscal reckoning. Huge
structural changes, meanwhile, are occurring in the world economy. The
challenge for Canadian business, Mr. Carney argued, is to move beyond
the cocoon of the North American economy.

He put the challenge squarely: “Canadian business will need to develop
new markets as the traditional advantage of relatively open access to
U.S. markets becomes less valuable. To seize new opportunities, our
productivity levels must improve."At issue is whether Canadian
businesses can think beyond the U.S. market. If not, Canada will be
missing most of the new economic action. It's a hard challenge for a
country with so many branch plants, so few head offices, so much
self-satisfaction, and a long tradition of looking only south.
crossborder  productivity  economic_development  growth  head_offices  Jeffrey_Simpson  international_marketing  international_trade  complacency  beyondtheU.S.  Mark_Carney  structural_change  internationally_minded 
april 2010 by jerryking
Capital C: Why can't Canada get it in gear?
Jennifer Wells interview with Tony Chapman of Capital C.

"I look at Canada and I think, why aren't we doing global brands here? We have a multicultural society, we are one of the earliest adopters of new technologies in the world. We have so many things going for us, but no one's come up with a strategy that says, how do we become a superpower in creativity?"
Capital C has proved a creative power in the advertising world. That unbranded "Wig-out" viral video – the one in which a bride goes nuts over hair unhappiness – was revealed to be the work of Capital C for Sunsilk shampoo. The agency counts Frito Lay Canada among its client base, and Dove among its brands.
"We won the global retail strategy for Dove worldwide two weeks ago," Mr. Chapman says. "The retail footprint for Dove around the world will now be coming out of Capital C. That's the kind of work we need to get."
By "we" he doesn't mean his own shop, but the agency world in Canada.
"Could you imagine if we had, for example, the ability to do predictive modelling against every marketplace in the world?" In other words if Canada sold itself as the world's test market, with the capability of measuring the relative impact of a product in marketplaces from Shanghai to Mumbai to London.
"A big part of the future of creativity is understanding the consumer – how they think, feel and behave," he says.
"I want every agency in Canada and every head office in Canada to have access to the technology and tools to invent, create, test, prototype, validate and implement. … If we're the test market for validating brands, head offices around the world are going to send their best people to Canada."
He envisages university alliances and the development of a student population where the learning is more about entrepreneurship and less about the standard marketing precepts of product, place and promotion.
Tony_Chapman  branding  innovators  Jennifer_Wells  design  national_identity  predictive_modeling  thought_leadership  advertising_agencies  Frito_Lay  Bolthouse_Farms  global_champions  brands  multiculturalism  advertising  creativity  test_marketing  innovation  Capital_C  cultural_creativity  Canada  customer_insights  consumer_research  head_offices 
january 2009 by jerryking

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